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On the subject of Robert Kirkman

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  • On the subject of Robert Kirkman

    I just caught up on Invincible by Robert Kirkman, which does the whole superhero deconstruction better than the Boys in my oppinion, and it got me thinking, Kirkman can do some WoD stuff, assuming he's not going to do a secomd season of Invincible. And what would WoD by Kirkman look like anyway? Probably a deconstuction on fantasy or Sci-fi, or perhaps horror ala his other franchise the walking dead.

  • #2
    You know there are plenty of deconstructive horror comics out there right? Nailbiter, Hack/Slash and Locke & Key.....

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    • #3
      I wouldn't call Walking Dead a deconstruction fo the Genre....

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Lian View Post
        I wouldn't call Walking Dead a deconstruction fo the Genre....
        It actually more of a reconstruction. Previous to the Walking Dead zombie comics were essentially all TnA all day every day.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Spook359 View Post

          It actually more of a reconstruction. Previous to the Walking Dead zombie comics were essentially all TnA all day every day.


          I am not sure I'd count it as reconstruction. Its just a solid work of the genre. I think reconstruction needs to be in reaction to deconstruction and T&A zombies wasn't really the deconstruction.... its more like Shawn of the Dead or Zombieland.

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          • #6
            While I can't really agree with the idea that zombie comics had devolved into T&A-fests (T&A has been part of the zombie genre since before Romero reinvented it and like lots of low budget horror adding some skin scenes was frequently used as a way to keep the main audience coming) even if there were some rather prominent examples, think the problem is that zombies haven't really don't the big golden age/stall/deconstruction/reconstruction phase a lot of other subgenres have. Mostly because deconstructing and reconstructing zombies is so prevalent in the subgenre that you don't really think of it as happening.

            But back to Kirkman? The rare thing about TWD is its length. Most zombie fiction is short. Even with the bigger franchises the individual stories tend to be separate entities with no to minimal continuity despite existing in the same universe. Of course, one can argue that TWD comic got too big before Kirkman finally ended it (almost 200 issues is a lot). The Whispers and Commonwealth arcs aren't inherently bad or anything, but there was a fairly solid ending after defeating Negan, and a general feeling of repeating similar beats.

            I think, then, the question is if that's the skill people really think a WoD show needs. Kirkman's solo work, like ASoIaF/GoT, has great characters and world building, but frequently at the cost of pacing and story. The WoD already has lots of official characters to draw from, and lots of books about how to make more cool characters in it. It also already has a well developed lore and setting. What's Kirkman bringing to the table then as someone that's only really worked on adapting properties he's already creatively involved in? Do we want a WoD show that's 11+ seasons all about one group of characters that risks getting bogged down as the narrative tension between solving problems (and thus ending storylines) and keeping the world as-is so the premise doesn't wildly change? Or do we want a tighter package? I know there's plenty of people that are divided on the idea of a WoD show that's long form vs. anthology, but there's something to be said for people that have more skill at doing a tight 3-5 season show. I feel like there's a solid argument for some more like Seth Rogen give his run as a producer and director on Preacher (and also someone working on The Boys and Invincible).

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