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India in the World of Darkness

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  • #16
    IIRC, the original pitch for the Victorian Age Ventrue Chronicles was supposed to include a chapter set in 19th century Bombay (what is now Mumbai), but this was nixed for some reason or another. Which is kind of a pity, as I've long thought it was an interesting setting for a pre WW2 Vampire or Mage game.


    What is tolerance? It is the consequence of humanity. We are all formed of frailty and error; let us pardon reciprocally each other's folly. That is the first law of nature.
    Voltaire, "Tolerance" (1764)

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    • #17
      Originally posted by No One of Consequence View Post
      India was always sort of a blank area. A lot of this is mostly the realities of trying to research things in the pre-Internet age and India not being as trendy as, say, Japan or China/Hong Kong among geek media. But there were bits scattered about.

      Vampire

      Even as far back as 1992, it was established that various clans dwelt in India, including Malkavians, Tzimisce, and Ventrue. By the time of the revised era, we also had the majority of the Ravnos clan, a line of Setites, and others. By the mid 19th century, really every clan should be there, both as long standing native lines (including surviving Salubri, and possibly even surviving Cappadocians), and as those who've come with various waves of Portuguese, French, and British merchants, soldiers and explorers (including Tremere and Giovanni).

      My own head canon about Hindu vampires is here.


      Werewolf

      While the game was originally very focused on North America and Europe, it gradually nudged its way into India. This included the original Silver Fangs tribe book (House Blood Red Crest) and the Stargazers, among others. Then came the Changing Breeds, including the Makara stream of the Mokole, the various Bastet tribes (mainly the Baghera, but also Khan and some Simba), the Ratkin, the Nagah, and Ananasi. The revised books introduced the post-Week of Nightmares Camp of Shiva, which was a cross-breed alliance of mostly animal-born shifters who felt that with the Apocalypse/Age of Iron imminent, the Garou's focus on human culture and ties were becoming an impediment to the war effort. The revised Silent Strider book also briefly discusses the alleged Garou "caste" system in the region, with different tribes being seen as akin to certain castes.


      Mage

      The Euthanatos and Cult of Ecstasy have always been presented as having strong ties to India, with certain parts of the Dreamspeakers, Celestial Chorus, and Akashic Brotherhood also having their place. Also the occasional bits about Hermetics, Batini, Etherites and Virtual Adepts. Guide to the Traditions talked about the region a little. I'm going to go out on a limb and guess that Victorian Age Mage is going to have an entire section about the region.


      Wraith

      Wraith the Great War and the W20 material, especially the Book of Oblivion IIRC, have the most information about India's underworld.


      Changeling

      There's a thread about Changelings in India here. I think there's only one or two "official" Indian related kiths, but a lot of people have ideas for potential new ones.


      Kindred of the East

      India's Kuei Jin called themselves the Infinite Thunder Courts. A lot of them followed "heretical" (ie non-Chinese) dharmas, specifically the Face of the Gods and the Flame of the Rising Phoenix (which is to say they see themselves as either reborn proto-gods or as evolved versions of their humans selves).


      Mummy

      Next to nothing that I'm aware of. It's possible there may be some purely Indian variation of Immortals. Also likely a handful of Ishmaeli or Greek mummies who came to India at some point in the past and just decided to settle there.
      So the Bone Gnawers are the Dalits? Right or the Cargots or the Dowa people. Just in general a group of people considered “unclean” and scapegoated.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Konradleijon View Post

        So the Bone Gnawers are the Dalits? Right or the Cargots or the Dowa people. Just in general a group of people considered “unclean” and scapegoated.
        They've always mixed in with groups who are socio-economically marginalized. I want to say that the original Bone Gnawers tribe-book specifically mentions India's "untouchables" at some point, but I don't have it handy to check. I don't think the Garou pseudo-castes in India 100% match to their human counterparts (especially when you factor in lupus and Red Talons, or just where Metis would fit in all of this), and I've always kind of interpreted them as being more of a close analog than a direct "all members of Tribe X are part of human caste/varna/jati A" situation. For instance, some of the Silver Fangs' House Blood Red Crest kinfolk lines may be from Brahmin or even well-established Vaishya families, even if the tribe/house is seen as having a Kshatriya role within India's Garou society. Likewise with the Bone Gnawers; Even though most of their kinfolk families in India are from groups outside the four Varna like the Dalits, they're still part of the Garou Nation and likely seen as something akin to the Shudra (probably alongside the region's Black Furies and Silent Striders), even if at the low end of that rank. At least this is how I've tended to read it.


        What is tolerance? It is the consequence of humanity. We are all formed of frailty and error; let us pardon reciprocally each other's folly. That is the first law of nature.
        Voltaire, "Tolerance" (1764)

        Comment


        • #19
          Yeah in India the Caste system has been more flexible at times so that checks out . Also the basic cosmology from Werewolf was lifted from Hinduism with the Destroyer ,Preserver, and Creator, which means Hindu Garou would aquite the True Wyrm of balance with Shiva

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          • #20
            In my own head cannon, the Garou/Fera varna-like system roughly tends to break down thusly:

            Brahmin (priests/teachers) - Stargazers and Children of Gaia; Makara (Mokole), Jambavana (Indian Gurahl)

            Kshatriya (rulers/warriors) - House Blood Red Crest (Silver Fangs) and Shadow Lords; Khan and Singh (Indian Simba who are almost extinct)

            Vaishya (merchants/agriculturalists) - Glasswalkers; Corax

            Shudra (laborers/artisans/service providers/"commoners") - Black Furies, Bone Gnawers, Silent Striders; Ajaba

            Dhalit (those outside this system) - Ronin, Ratkin, Rokea, Nagah (because no one knows they exist), and Ananasi (who prefer to do their own thing); much of the Camp of Shiva (especially those who are animal-born)

            I have never been able to make up my mind about the Baghera, as I can see a case for more than one group.

            The Red Talons are kind of a grey area, as they could easily be seen as akin to Brahmin (for their prophetic abilities), Kshatriyas, Vaishya (overseeing the subcontinent's wolf population), and Dhalit (wanting nothing to do with such human-derived silliness).

            Then there's the Uktena who've probably tried to interbreed with/adapt some of the various tribal peoples (who are traditionally outside the varna system) over the past century, who may be viewed as akin to Shudra or Dhalit depending on the attitudes of the individuals involved.

            Then there's the whole issue of Auspices, Metis, Pure Breed, and other factors which probably result in each of the above categories having bunches of subcategories similar to real world Jati. Outsider Garou and Fera probably find the entire thing almost impossible to successfully navigate without years of immersion and local guidance.

            (Jambavana and Singh are names I use for my own games; They aren't official.)


            What is tolerance? It is the consequence of humanity. We are all formed of frailty and error; let us pardon reciprocally each other's folly. That is the first law of nature.
            Voltaire, "Tolerance" (1764)

            Comment

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