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Kingdoms of the Feathered Serpent

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  • Kingdoms of the Feathered Serpent

    I feel a bit sheepish putting this up here, but I and Luisarmander have finished two entire chapters for the Kingdoms of the Feathered Serpent project, and I would really like to see what people think of them! They cover the history of the Nahuali, the native fae of Central America, and the regions that correspond to the mortal lands of Mexico and Belize. I'm a good chunk of the way into chapter three, which explains the Nahuali themselves in detail, and I'll post that once we have it done and edited.

    Till then please let me know what you all think! Also, has anyone heard anything more about a Storyteller's Vault for CtD? I would love to try and submit all this once it is finished.

    PS. I can't seem to get the files to upload, so I'll just put the link to the Shadownessence forum where, for whatever reason, they DID upload:

    http://shadownessence.org/index.php?...hered-serpent/

  • #2
    Do you have the Rain Dancer Dwarfs as a kith?

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    • #3
      I can't seem to get to any text.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Astromancer View Post
        Do you have the Rain Dancer Dwarfs as a kith?
        thr Kachina?


        It is a time for great deeds!

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        • #5
          There is a type of fay in Mexican folklore that dances in the rain. These small, but not inhumanly small, folk are said to be able to speak to ghosts and take people back and forth to the land of the Dead though the falling rain. I don't remember all the details from what I read years ago.

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          • #6
            I thought that was the Kachina and they are already a Kith.


            It is a time for great deeds!

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            • #7
              Tlaloques is the fae race you are thinking of. They are not fae with "death seeing" magics per se...

              They are the spirits of children dead by drowning. God Tlaloc takes pity on them and turns them into his "angels" and takes them to live with him in Tlalocan, a heaven-like place full of music, color and happiness. He gifts them each a magic jar that they can crack open (thunder and lightning) to let out the rain inside.

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              • #8
                What Luisarmander said. And yes, they will be one of the kith in the book. I'm about half way through the kith section right now. The Tlaloques are the last kith in the section (being presented alphabetically)

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Astromancer View Post
                  I can't seem to get to any text.
                  Were you able to get any of the text in the end? I've posted the first two chapters (history and setting (Mexico through Belize))

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                  • #10
                    Any chance there's a tiny village in the Yucatan next to a hill covered with evil sentient man eating plants? I ask just because I'm a huge fan of Scott Smith's The Ruins. (The book; the film was awful.)


                    What is tolerance? It is the consequence of humanity. We are all formed of frailty and error; let us pardon reciprocally each other's folly. That is the first law of nature.
                    Voltaire, "Tolerance" (1764)

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by No One of Consequence View Post
                      Any chance there's a tiny village in the Yucatan next to a hill covered with evil sentient man eating plants? I ask just because I'm a huge fan of Scott Smith's The Ruins. (The book; the film was awful.)
                      There's no reason that there couldn't be! I am not fa military with the book, so I didn't have anything in there as of yet from it. So far the setting chapter is mostly based on human culture and history and it's impact on the Central American Dream, but I'm always looking for more inspiration! If nothing else than to include in the 'resources' section

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                      • #12
                        The plot is that a handful of young 20-something American tourists at one of those coastal resort towns head out in to the Yucatan to visit some acquaintance who was working on an archeological dig. The place they end up is this old vine covered hill, surrounded by a cleared circle of salted earth. Once they go to the hill, the locals at the near by village threaten to kill them if they try to recross the salt field. Slowly and rather horrifically, they find out why. It's a pretty grim story, but very well done. It may be too dark for Changeling, unless one wanted to play up the Fomorians and other Very Bad Things. (It's the sort of thing that wouldn't be out of place in Call of Cthulhu.) But it's one of those things I enjoy as a reminder that there are places one goes where the "normal" rules don't apply any more.


                        What is tolerance? It is the consequence of humanity. We are all formed of frailty and error; let us pardon reciprocally each other's folly. That is the first law of nature.
                        Voltaire, "Tolerance" (1764)

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                        • #13
                          There might be a tie in with one of the new thallain I've come across in Central American folklore. A creature called the xtabai, wicheck something like a cross between a kubera and a harpy. I've been debating if they would be thallain or a sort of botanical redcap though (there is some implication of a benevolent version). But I've already got over a dozen new kith for the Nahuali so I was leaning towards thallain

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                          • #14
                            Assorted potential inspiration :

                            Like Water for Chocolate, both the novel by Laura Esquivel and the 1992 film adaption. It's set around the time of the second Mexican Revolution and involves themes of family, keeping and breaking traditions, and cooking (which makes it really good Boggin fodder).

                            Rough Magic (1995) is a kind of odd film set in the 1950s, with an apprentice wizard going to Mexico and learning from a Mayan shaman. It's based on a book by prolific crime thriller writer James Hadley Chase (Miss Shumway Waves a Magic Wand) which I've yet to find a copy of.

                            Laura Hillenbrand's Seabiscuit: An American Legend includes quite a bit of interesting information about horse racing in Depression Era Tijuana.

                            Mike Mignola's Hellboy in Mexico is a lot of fun, as is it's spinoff, Frankenstein Underground.

                            While The Beast of Hollow Mountain (1956) isn't really worth going to the trouble of watching, the idea of cowboys in Mexico stumbling upon cattle-eating dinosaurs is weird enough that it needs an homage somewhere, IMO.


                            What is tolerance? It is the consequence of humanity. We are all formed of frailty and error; let us pardon reciprocally each other's folly. That is the first law of nature.
                            Voltaire, "Tolerance" (1764)

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                            • #15
                              Just wanted to encourage you on this project, as I'm extremely interested in this material. The kithain of the Mayan culture play a big role in my upcoming chronicle. I've been planning to stat out four new kith, two Nunnehi (Chaacob, the "rain dwarves" that Astromancer mentioned above, and Sisemité, bigfoot) and two Dreaming kith (Alux and Nagual), but was having trouble because I wasn't that familiar with the lore.

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