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Some books you want to Read!

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  • Some books you want to Read!

    Basically, I'm starting a list of books related to the subject of Fairy Lore. This might be controversial, but to my mind, UFOs, ultraterrestrials, and the like, are just Fairies who know how to buy bacofoil. So some works of UFOlogy that seem to fit fairy lore and myth might get included. Please feel free to add your own picks.

  • #2
    The book I finished less than half an hour before writing this post is first. I saw it advertised in the Fortean Times (a magazine everyone on these forums wants) it is called Magical Folk: British & Irish Fairies 500AD to the Present. The last three chapters are the most mindblowing, not that the rest of the book isn't impressive. The last three chapters cover, New England, Atlantic Canada, and the Irish Diaspora in America, all of which weren't supposed to have any fairy lore. But this book describes a fairy sighting in what is now London in the 1830s!

    You'll find a Nunnehi Thallian in this book, with enough details to get their powers right. You'll find a twentieth-century Leprechaun sighting in Connecticut! There's a detailed analysis of a fairy abduction in Iowa in the late 19th century. There's even a report without details of a Changeling in Newfoundland in 1968!
    Last edited by Astromancer; 06-09-2018, 08:32 AM.

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    • #3
      Less easy to get, but worthwhile, is Strange and Secret People. The simple demonstrations of how fairy beliefs in the minds of those who would deny they have them shape how they see reality is worth the price of the book. The Victorian editors of major London papers, with photographs contradicting their description published in the midst of their stories, describe certain African tribespeople (the Baka) as goblins. And never noticed what they did!
      .
      And that isn't all this book has.
      Last edited by Astromancer; 06-09-2018, 08:30 AM.

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      • #4
        With a longer view and wider geographical scope than most works on the Fariies, At the Bottom of the Garden moves from ancient greece to the modern world. It even explores non folkloric uses of fairy lore. Worth the money.

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        • #5
          For a book of scholarly essays on the fairy that's thick and dense try The Good Neighbors. Hundreds of pages of fairy lore and analysis.

          Now list some books of your own. Please.

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          • #6
            I mentioned this book on the Scion Forums but it has clear relevance here as well. A new and lively god on Celtic myth, Ireland's Immortals will repay a close reading.

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            • #7
              The connection between faerie folk and alien abductions/visitations isn't all that out there, relatively speaking. I remember Ken Hite writing about it more than a few times in his Suppressed Transmission column for Pyramid Magazine. The film Fire in the Sky (1993) was always an influence on how I imagined forced enchantment of mortals might result in PTSD. I've honestly always been kind of disappointed that The Autumn People did not include a group of UFO chasers as a possible hunter faction who were convinced that Changelings are actually alien invaders. Here is a summery of various fairy abduction stories.

              Fiction wise, Emma Bull's War for the Oaks, one of the pioneers of the urban fantasy genre. Likewise Charles deLint's Jack, the Giant Killer, Moonheart and Yarrow: An Autumn Tale (as well as a lot of his other work). And Neil Gaiman's Neverwhere.


              What is tolerance? It is the consequence of humanity. We are all formed of frailty and error; let us pardon reciprocally each other's folly. That is the first law of nature.
              Voltaire, "Tolerance" (1764)

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              • #8
                Originally posted by No One of Consequence View Post
                The connection between faerie folk and alien abductions/visitations isn't all that out there, relatively speaking. I remember Ken Hite writing about it more than a few times in his Suppressed Transmission column for Pyramid Magazine. The film Fire in the Sky (1993) was always an influence on how I imagined forced enchantment of mortals might result in PTSD. I've honestly always been kind of disappointed that The Autumn People did not include a group of UFO chasers as a possible hunter faction who were convinced that Changelings are actually alien invaders. Here is a summary of various fairy abduction stories.

                Fiction-wise, Emma Bull's War for the Oaks, one of the pioneers of the urban fantasy genre. Likewise Charles deLint's Jack, the Giant Killer, Moonheart and Yarrow: An Autumn Tale (as well as a lot of his other work). And Neil Gaiman's Neverwhere.
                I love Ken Hite's stuff too. As for your fiction, I've read the first two and I own a DVD of the last one, all are lovely.

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                • #9
                  I've actually met Hite a few times. He's a nice guy, and a fascinating conversationalist.

                  In the realm of urban fantasy books, Orson Scott Card's Magic Street is also pretty good (and one of the rare ones before recently to focus on African American characters). Also Simon R. Green's Drinking Midnight Wine is a fun read, as is Megan Lindholm's Wizard of the Pigeons. I've never read Holly Black's Tithe: A Modern Faerie Tale, but I've heard it's pretty good. Likewise Martin Miller's The Good Fairies of New York.



                  What is tolerance? It is the consequence of humanity. We are all formed of frailty and error; let us pardon reciprocally each other's folly. That is the first law of nature.
                  Voltaire, "Tolerance" (1764)

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                  • #10
                    This all great stuff guys, I used to have a big list of books I was going to get from Amazon and libraries and stuff but I lost it. But I'm going to look into some of this stuff. Does anyone have suggestions for tales from the Americas, Australia and Africa? I only have spotty very specific knowledge of some of their folklore and myths and I would be interested in good sources on learning more.


                    It is a time for great deeds!

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Eldagusto View Post
                      This all great stuff guys, I used to have a big list of books I was going to get from Amazon and libraries and stuff but I lost it. But I'm going to look into some of this stuff. Does anyone have suggestions for tales from the Americas, Australia and Africa? I only have spotty very specific knowledge of some of their folklore and myths and I would be interested in good sources on learning more.
                      For an interesting work of Native American tales, written by Ursula Le Guin's mother, try "The Inland Whale."

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                      • #12
                        While not really about mythlore, per say, I am a big fan of the late Tony Hillerman's novels about the Navajo Tribal Police, which do tend to get into issues of religion and folklore at times. Also, there was the one Hellboy story where he lives the story of an African hero (the name of which I am blanking on at the moment). But it is very awesome and the sort of thing that would make a great movie.


                        What is tolerance? It is the consequence of humanity. We are all formed of frailty and error; let us pardon reciprocally each other's folly. That is the first law of nature.
                        Voltaire, "Tolerance" (1764)

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                        • #13
                          Yesterday (June 15, 2018), I ordered Fairies a Dangerous History I really don't know the quality of the work, but there is more than enough violence associated with fairylore to justify a book of this title.
                          Last edited by Astromancer; 06-23-2018, 08:26 AM.

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                          • #14
                            Among the stranger books I'll recommend is Meeting the Crowd This book is about encounters of people with the fairies in living memory often told to the author by the person who had the experience. This is Fairy Mythology in the raw.
                            Last edited by Astromancer; 06-23-2018, 08:24 AM.

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                            • #15
                              One of the first serious works of fairy lore I ever read was The Erotic World of Faery. The author really is more focused on literary tradition than other issues, but her focus on fairies as aspects of story would be useful to both GMs and players.
                              Last edited by Astromancer; 06-23-2018, 08:22 AM.

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