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  • #31
    Originally posted by Eldagusto View Post
    I don't think a self made boggan would be the same as a Boggan noble Kith... Instead I would draw upon ideas like the King of the Dwarves Alvis, or the Ivaldi, or Norðri, Suðri, Austri and Vestri. But depends on how you untangle Myths and Kiths, Dwarves may not exactly mean Boggan, they could, or they could mean Boggan, Nocker and Wiechtal which I like.
    Drawing on the stories of dwarves for noble boggan inspiration is a great idea. That said, a wealthy boggan noble house founded on hard work isn’t a bad one, either. Every noble family got their start somewhere, and earning it through hard work and good sense seems reasonable for the kith. Maybe I should break down and write up a quick summary for a commoner kith noble house.


    Jason Ross Inczauskis, Freelance Writer
    Currently writing: Dark Eras 2, Mummy: The Curse 2e, Pirates of Pugmire, TC In Media Res. Previous projects: DtD Night Horrors: Enemy Action; C20 Anthology of Dreams
    Masculine pronouns preferred.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by White Oak Dragon View Post

      Drawing on the stories of dwarves for noble boggan inspiration is a great idea. That said, a wealthy boggan noble house founded on hard work isn’t a bad one, either. Every noble family got their start somewhere, and earning it through hard work and good sense seems reasonable for the kith. Maybe I should break down and write up a quick summary for a commoner kith noble house.


      Ah, the classic feud between Old Money and New Money.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by Nyrufa View Post



        Okay, well, I finally came up with this idea tonight / today (depending on how you look at it) and I think that what makes these "Highborn" stand out from typical commoners would be the manner in which they present themselves.



        For starters, let's take a look at a "High" Boggan. Since Boggans are traditionally associated with hard work, fine craftsmanship and gracious living conditions, a member of the nobility might reside in splendid opulence. As I suggested with my Merchant Prince idea, a Boggan who counts themselves among the nobility might have access to only the finest goods and services that are reasonably available in their area. Their homes might be grand and spacious, and catered to by a large number of common Boggans who take pride in their duties as household servants.

        The "High" Boggan is a self made Boggan, who's family earned their status through years of hard work and good business sense. Which differentiates their kith from the Sidhe, who's titles were given to them under pretenses of being inherently superior to everybody else.


        .

        No, Boggan are creatures of community. So the "Self made man" is anathema to them. They build each other up. The family passes it forward. They work hard and pass their holdings onto the next generation, but also see to those who are their charges. They aren't self made because that would be an insult to their ancestors. They build something that lasts and for all.

        Tell me that isn't what Dougal think they are.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by Lian View Post


          No, Boggan are creatures of community. So the "Self made man" is anathema to them. They build each other up. The family passes it forward. They work hard and pass their holdings onto the next generation, but also see to those who are their charges. They aren't self made because that would be an insult to their ancestors. They build something that lasts and for all.

          Tell me that isn't what Dougal think they are.


          You don't build a flourishing enterprise with just one man. But you still need somebody at the top of the organization to make sure everything runs smoothly, and can establish relations with other businesses. In that spirit, a noble Boggan can be somebody who proved themselves resourceful and talented enough to climb to the top of the organization and thus inherit the position when it's time for the previous boss to "retire."

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          • #35
            Originally posted by Nyrufa View Post



            You don't build a flourishing enterprise with just one man. But you still need somebody at the top of the organization to make sure everything runs smoothly, and can establish relations with other businesses. In that spirit, a noble Boggan can be somebody who proved themselves resourceful and talented enough to climb to the top of the organization and thus inherit the position when it's time for the previous boss to "retire."
            You do, but the duty of the Present is to the future. The boss has duty to craft an Heir, if its blood, or built of stone, or stolen from some mortal mother, but every Fairy Lord is doing this.


            But we circle back what does a Noble boggan look like? Lets assume "Noble bearing" is the standard. Oba get it, Sidhe get it.. ok so what does the High Boggan get.. a solid work ethic and the ability to work hard.. this can be covered by the boggan birthright... but he needs to be in charge. He needs to be out in the open being seen. Even as the Merchant prince he needs to go out and talk to the Nonboggans.

            But if you say the High boggan has the Noble bearing.. and House Dougal's bonus.. it starts looking right to me? Maybe there used to be Real High boggans who got bred out over time by mixing with others.. who knows?


            I also like how no one is willing to Defend the clurichain.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by Lian View Post

              I also like how no one is willing to Defend the clurichain.
              Who says that nobody’s willing to defend the clurichaun? I assumed that the focus on the boggan was because they seemed the most “common” of the kiths, and that if one could justify a boggan noble house/kith, then the others would seem more reasonable by extension. If we want to start looking at noble clurichauns, I’m game.


              Jason Ross Inczauskis, Freelance Writer
              Currently writing: Dark Eras 2, Mummy: The Curse 2e, Pirates of Pugmire, TC In Media Res. Previous projects: DtD Night Horrors: Enemy Action; C20 Anthology of Dreams
              Masculine pronouns preferred.

              Comment


              • #37
                I picture a High Pooka as the Forest Spirit from Princess Monoke, or Aslan, or the Last Unicorn. Mythical animals in their fae mien, but perhaps with a mundane animal form too (a deer, a lion, a white stallion, respectively).

                A boggan noble would probably be elected or rise through the ranks, rather than being born a class apart. The boggans seem too egalitarian for noble birth. But once there, they might recall dwarven kings, or reflect the great dreams of the 'everyman hero' or '(wo)man for the people'. They'd give great speeches and rally the workers I'd also tweak Noble Bearing to give them +2 Charisma instead of +2 Appearance.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by [Insert Original Name
                  ;n1229261]A few years ago I was reading Book of Lost Houses. The Beaumayn section of the book gave me the impression that the Fomorians were trying to steer the world toward Winter. I was initially confused by this. Why would they want a world where Glamour is even harder to come by? The Fomorians are fae right? so why bring about a scenario that would render them just as powerless as the rest of the fae? Did they have some kind of resistance to banality similar to House Balor's resistance to iron? That thought in particular, mixed with Beaumayn's insistence that the events leading up to the final nights was all part of the formorians sinister scheme, gave me this theory.

                  The Fomorians dont have a resistance to Banality. There completely immune to it.

                  The Fomorians are trapped in the dreaming by the Oaths they swore to the Tuatha. The Oaths are enforced by the dreaming itself. Thus to weaken the oaths that keep them imprisoned they would have to weaken the dreaming itself. The Fomorians were probably aware of the effect human belief had on reality and the dreaming this is why they kept them alive as vassals rather than just ignoring and going about their business.

                  If the magic keeping them imprisoned weakens not only will they free themselves, but the Kithain will be too weak from the scarce glamour to do anything.

                  Though I dont really have an explanation for why they would be immune to banality. Maybe the dreaming used to function completely differently before humanity existed and the Fomorians are a by product of that forgotten age. Maybe there not fae at all and are horribly powerful eldritch monstrosities that happened to dabble with human dreams. Regardless, they lack the connection and dependence that the dreaming and fae have on humanity.
                  I have come to the same conclusion after reading Dreams & Nightmares.

                  Your last question as to why Fomorians are immune to Banality requires thinking about the relationship between Glamour, Banality and Nightmares. I do think that those who follow the Way of Nightmares (because it is, in my game, as much a Way like the Changeling or Secret Way or Arcadian or Mists Way), since they draw their existence and nourishment not from dreams, produced by imagination and thus the higher brain, but from primordial emotions (fear, terror, lust, hunger, rage) that are linked with the reptilian brain and the instinct of survival, are impervious to Banality, i.e. to the denial of imagination, as someone already pointed out.

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