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  • Question about Editions.

    So, i ordered the first edition of changeling by Ebay (second edition is expensive as shite), i been curious about this game for a while now and i consider it one of the hardest's to run so far on the entire OWoD library.
    i was wondering if someone could tell me the core and key differences between first and second edition that i should keep in mind, once i start reading the first ed


    Forum's Official's Joker and Trickster. Pardon my bad english, aint my first language (I Speak Spanish).
    ST: DtF, HtR, WtO, MtA
    Signature Chars: Crowley (hakalu), Joe The Nuwisha (WtA)
    Changelings: be afraid of the Technocracian High Five of Doom

  • #2
    The first edition core book has more evocative artwork. Second edition has a magic system that can be made to be usable with a little house ruling.

    Seriously, you won't be able to use the magic system in first edition because you won't have any cantrip cards. The first attempt at a cardless system didn't show up until the players guide. If you can't wait for C20, I'd recommend learning the game with second edition and using first edition as an art book.


    Charlie Cantrell
    Onyx Path Freelancer
    Changeling: The Dreaming 20th Anniversary Edition, Night Horrors: Conquering Heroes, Book of Freeholds

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    • #3
      First edition debuted in a sort of lull in the Changeling metaplot. The Accordance War (between Commoner and Sidhe) has ended, and the benevolent High King David sits on the throne of North America. Some sidhe have vague memories of something bad following them to Earth, but the Fomorians have yet to make their appearance, nor has the Shadow Court really done anything (yet). And only five of the fourteen sidhe Houses have returned to Earth.

      The corebook uses San Francisco as the default city, and sets up the first adventure in the Immortal Eyes chronicle. Some neat anecdotes (I'd never heard of Emperor Norton before), and its certainly a playable adventure. Parties unknown manage to open an antique chest, setting a small army of magic toys loose in the city . . . magic toys that promptly become life size (some of whom have cannons).

      Originally posted by PookaKnight View Post
      The first edition core book has more evocative artwork. Second edition has a magic system that can be made to be usable with a little house ruling.

      Seriously, you won't be able to use the magic system in first edition because you won't have any cantrip cards. The first attempt at a cardless system didn't show up until the players guide. If you can't wait for C20, I'd recommend learning the game with second edition and using first edition as an art book.
      Well, you could make your own. And didn't the original corebook have sample ones that you could cut out, as well as optional dice rolls? My copy's put away, but I'm pretty sure it did.

      Crowley? This is relevant because Changeling magic has sort of a "dare" or "punishment game" vibe to it. In order to use a cantrip (i.e. spell), the player has to play a "bunk" card - basically a dare that the character has to perform. Recite poetry, make a funny face, cut yourself . . . the more drastic the bunk, the more power the cantrip had.

      Oh, and there was a big expansion in powers/spells between first and second edition. First had only five Arts (changeling equivalent to Disciplines), but by second there were . . . .13? Something like that.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by One Vorlon View Post
        First edition debuted in a sort of lull in the Changeling metaplot. The Accordance War (between Commoner and Sidhe) has ended, and the benevolent High King David sits on the throne of North America. Some sidhe have vague memories of something bad following them to Earth, but the Fomorians have yet to make their appearance, nor has the Shadow Court really done anything (yet). And only five of the fourteen sidhe Houses have returned to Earth.
        Only five of the Houses are known to have returned in the 1e core; Shadow Court revealed three of the other Houses had returned as well, Ailil, Balor and Leanhaun.


        Scion 2E: What We Know - A wiki compiling info on second edition Scion.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by One Vorlon View Post
          First edition debuted in a sort of lull in the Changeling metaplot. The Accordance War (between Commoner and Sidhe) has ended, and the benevolent High King David sits on the throne of North America. Some sidhe have vague memories of something bad following them to Earth, but the Fomorians have yet to make their appearance, nor has the Shadow Court really done anything (yet). And only five of the fourteen sidhe Houses have returned to Earth.

          The corebook uses San Francisco as the default city, and sets up the first adventure in the Immortal Eyes chronicle. Some neat anecdotes (I'd never heard of Emperor Norton before), and its certainly a playable adventure. Parties unknown manage to open an antique chest, setting a small army of magic toys loose in the city . . . magic toys that promptly become life size (some of whom have cannons).


          Well, you could make your own. And didn't the original corebook have sample ones that you could cut out, as well as optional dice rolls? My copy's put away, but I'm pretty sure it did.

          Crowley? This is relevant because Changeling magic has sort of a "dare" or "punishment game" vibe to it. In order to use a cantrip (i.e. spell), the player has to play a "bunk" card - basically a dare that the character has to perform. Recite poetry, make a funny face, cut yourself . . . the more drastic the bunk, the more power the cantrip had.

          Oh, and there was a big expansion in powers/spells between first and second edition. First had only five Arts (changeling equivalent to Disciplines), but by second there were . . . .13? Something like that.
          Instead of cards, you can just allocate a rating to each bunk based on its complexity and daring. Subtract this from the base cantrip difficulty. Done.

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          • #6
            Also, in 1st Ed. Core Rulebook, Changeling was more about being not entirely sure of what you are. Arcadia and Dreaming are almost synonyms, 'cause both are almost inaccessible (only after Nobles: the Shining Host you learn more about the Dreaming). There was no Call Upon The Wyrd, Dragon's Ire, Enchanted Blow, etc to prove you're real to people. Actually, there was little evidence that being a Changeling was something more than being a deluded.

            Put that, it makes more sense why there's Bedlan and the Seemings. Of course, there are a lot of problems involving rules, but the Theme and Mood are amazing! It is still my favourite CtD book.

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            • #7
              A quick Google will bring up the rules you're missing in one form or another, but some of them require house ruling anyway. Here are some fast work-arounds you can use in the meantime.

              Think of Calling on the Wyrd as a changeling's version of a werewolf shifting. They bring their full fae mien into the real world so they can cause some mischief or make all their fancy chimerical weapons real. RAW call for 1WP, 1 Glamour and a Willpower roll.

              Invoking the Dragon's Ire is basically your boosted Attributes option. Roll Remembrance during combat (variable difficulty). Each success grants an extra die to all combat actions (including attack dice pools). RAW basically limits this to sidhe and high level Remembrance fae, which is yet another benefit the sidhe get over others. You might opt to base it on Glamour instead and make it available to everyone.

              Enchanted Strike and Dolorous Blow involve imbuing Glamour into a weapon. ES does no damage but enchants the target instead. DB does cause damage AND enchants them at the same time, meaning you can strike your target with a chimerical weapon but inflict real damage. The latter only works for the turn, however, whereas the former causes enchantment for the usual duration (IIRC). You might have the fae roll Glamour (difficulty of target's Banality) if you think the target might want to resist enchantment.
              Last edited by adambeyoncelowe; 09-19-2016, 03:03 AM.

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