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Cybernetics and the Consensus.

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Bluecho View Post
    First, your very admission to the titanium stick being put in your leg because of an accident makes it a different matter. You HAD to get your "augmentation" in order to correct a problem. You would fall under the same heading as vets or other accident victims who would need cybernetic limbs. But you're still in a minority, compared to all the people with fully functioning limbs. Same with people who use laser eye surgery, since it was either that or spend the rest of their lives with glasses (assuming their vision even can be corrected with them).

    It's an entirely different matter to chop off fully functioning limbs, or pluck out fully functioning eyes, in order to receive machine ones. That's a bridge too far for most people, asking them to go under the knife when it's not necessary. Especially considering any number of side effects having artificial limbs could have in comparison to organic ones. Metal limbs are heavy (putting the user off balance if they don't get symmetrical cybernetics, which only costs more), set off metal detectors (and may lead to further security screening, since a person could conceivably hide anything in their augmentations), give the user no tactile feedback, can be uncomfortable to the touch for oneself and others (just try being in bed with a significant other, and have a prosthetic limb jamming into yourself or them all night), may experience damage the user can't feel (and thus wouldn't be aware of, which is the entire purpose behind the pain response), will need to be regularly repaired and maintained and replaced, could attract lightning, and may (as is the case in Human Revolution) require the regular intake of anti-rejection drugs, that the user will need to pay for on top of the normal costs for the augmentation.

    None of these are deal-breakers for those who really want cyber augs, but they are considerations that consumers take into account. People who don't strictly need them might decide that the costs (both financial and other) are not worth it. Not even mentioning how surgery is not a minor matter, when it involves amputation or digging through the skull.
    Its a matter of how the scenario is built. If the augs have heavy bad side effects, if it's too expensive... Sure. It all depends a lot, since it's all a fictional consideration. In our world, for example, women with fake tits, althouth not the majority of women, are still pretty much common. Now, if they had go make monthly repairs on their tits, sure, I bet that it would be a lot less common (so, even prostitutes wouldn't have 'em, probably only porn actress would still do it). So, it will be a matter of how you'll depict them (fake tits don't need drugs, nor regular upkeep).

    Prostetic limbs could have tactile, being connected to the user's brain, about metal detecting, I was hoping I could make a little show entering Banks because of my leg, just for the fun, but it just didn't happen.

    Some materials - plastic, titanium, kevlar, ceramics - are actually lightier than bones and meat and blood, fat and skin.

    So, my point is, it would be a matter of the setting

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Karlgust View Post

      Its a matter of how the scenario is built. If the augs have heavy bad side effects, if it's too expensive... Sure. It all depends a lot, since it's all a fictional consideration. In our world, for example, women with fake tits, althouth not the majority of women, are still pretty much common. Now, if they had go make monthly repairs on their tits, sure, I bet that it would be a lot less common (so, even prostitutes wouldn't have 'em, probably only porn actress would still do it). So, it will be a matter of how you'll depict them (fake tits don't need drugs, nor regular upkeep).

      Prostetic limbs could have tactile, being connected to the user's brain, about metal detecting, I was hoping I could make a little show entering Banks because of my leg, just for the fun, but it just didn't happen.

      Some materials - plastic, titanium, kevlar, ceramics - are actually lightier than bones and meat and blood, fat and skin.

      So, my point is, it would be a matter of the setting
      Understood. My assumption was a setting - as the OP described - where cybernetic limbs were just filtering into the Consensus. As in, within the not too distant future. At most, a few decades from now. Deus Ex: Human Revolution and its sequel are set in the 2020s, hence the standard I'm working with.

      Under that assumption, cybernetics would be commercially available but not necessarily affordable for everyone. Amputees and similar people could get them because most insurance companies would be convinced of the need. Assuming the individual in question had insurance, that is. Getting augmentations that aren't strictly necessary, though, will be harder to justify, both from a financial standpoint and a "do I really want to chop off my arm?" standpoint.

      Although thinking back, there is Open Bionics, which are working hard to produce working and intricate prosthetics, at prices lower than the nearest competition. So I suppose it depends on how much true "connected to your nerve endings and fully articulate" cybernetics cost to produce and install. The ones we have now move through sensors attached to muscle groups, and are...better than nothing, but still not great.


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      • #18
        The ones the Technocracy can build are great

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        • #19
          Aren't cybernetics becoming more and more accepted in our world? They're no longer the stuff of science fiction anymore. In fact, I've got to say that I'm impressed at how fast the technology is advancing, in fact, I've got the impression that the speed of our technological development is increasing. A lot of the stuff that the technocracy has will become part of the consensus in the coming years and decades.

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