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  • #31
    Originally posted by baakyocalder View Post
    Cult of Ecstasy nominee: Hugh Hefner. Playboy magazine is pretty much is about men enjoying fashion, good writing and pictures of beautiful women. Hugh sold a whole lifestyle of pleasure. Though if you want him as a Syndicate guy to channel the growing sexual revolution, one might have a case there.
    I'd be hesitant to put the Heff into the Ecstatics, because sexual pleasure is not ecstasy and vice versa. Sexual pleasure can be used as a tool for ecstasy - just ask Charles Manson, it was one of the tricks in his bag - but in and of itself a preoccupation and predilection with sexual pleasure and base luxury has as much to do with ecstasy as a dentist's blood bowl has to do with a Verbena's sacrifices.

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    • #32
      I am now imagining a Verbena sect made entirely out of dentists who frequently commune with a literal tooth fairy, offering sacrifices of pulled teeth.


      Keepers of the Wyck: A Chronicle I'm running FINALE: Chapter 39: Green Fairy

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      • #33
        Akashic Brotherhood - The Akashic Brotherhood is sort of about two things: on the one hand, meditation/enlightenment, especially as understood in Buddhism and Taoism, and on the other, the value of physical fitness, especially in context of the martial arts. For the first, that pretty much means every Buddhist and Taoist order would lead to Akashic mages. A couple obvious choices would be Dogen, the author of the Shobogenzo and founder of the Soto school of Zen, which focuses largely on zazen (sitting meditation). Zhuangzi, the second figure in Taoism, is another good example. Philosophically inclined martial artists like Miyamoto Musashi are prime for this. Bruce Lee is a fine example, but you could also stick MMA fighters in the tradition (Cung Le, for example), or even particularly dedicated athletes, like, say, Aly Raisman or Michael Phelps. Mas Oyama could be another interesting example. Jigoro Kano as well.

        Cult of Ecstasy - This is really about pushing beyond one's boundaries and entering altered states of consciousness, obviously. Timothy Leary's a good example, obviously, as are other psychedelics enthusiasts like Hunter S. Thompson. Alex Honnold might be another interesting example (he's a rock climber who uses no ropes or equipment). The members of more extreme electronic groups, like say Genesis P-Orridge of Psychic TV, could be interesting for this. Powerful jazz musicians could also be good, like Charles Mingus, Miles Davis, Art Blakey, and so on.

        Hollow Ones - A craft, I know, but one that I don't think enough people take advantage of. Rather than just viewing them as goth kids, I'd encourage people to look at them almost like a Mage equivalent of the Toreador, with the belief in the transcendence of art. Possible examples: symbolists like Arthur Rimbaud and Paul Verlaine, gothic romantics like Byron and the Shelleys, punk poets like Richard Hell, Jim Carroll, and Patti Smith, and maybe goth figures like Rozz Williams of Christian Death and Peter Steele of Type O Negative. Sylvia Plath could be good.

        Verbena - Deep ecology figures like Peter Singer and Murray Bookchin, mountain men and nature freaks like Christopher McCandless, neo-pagans like Gerald Gardner. Eco-terrorist organizations like the Earth Liberation Front could be a really interesting source of inspiration.

        Virtual Adepts - Obviously good calls with Julian Assange and Edward Snowden. Other than that, just go down the list with hackers and cypherpunks. Vitalik Buterin, Jacob Appelbaum, Aaron Swartz, I almost hate to bring up John McAfee... obviously, Alan Turing is an important founding father

        Order of Hermes - People trying to unlock the secrets of reality through academic thought... Baruch Spinoza, John Nash. Maybe occultists like Aleister Crowley. I could also see archeologists working well.

        Sons of Ether - I feel like any particularly visionary scientist who's received pushback for being ahead of their time, could fit in here. Elon Musk, not to be too cliche. The other thing is, any particularly noble scientists, who were disinterested in the status quo, establishment, or turning a profit... in other words, the people who wouldn't just go for the big bucks and prestige of the Technocracy. Explorers like Fridtjof Nansen could be really good.

        Dreamspeakers - I'm gonna be useless for coming up with names for this, but basically anyone focused on protecting indigenous rights, history, and culture. There are a number of major civil rights leaders in native communities in Canada, Central America, and so on.

        The Celestial Chorus can obviously fit with any monotheistic tradition, but I find the monist angle particularly interesting. George Fox, the founder of Quakerism, could be a good one. Major Sufists like Rumi and Kahlil Gibran could fit, if you didn't just want to make them Ahl-i-Batin. Rasputin could make a really cool Celestial Chorus barabbi or Marauder. I think Sikhism is an underutilized source for the Celestial Chorus. MLK and Malcolm X could work. Taqwacores (Muslim punks) like Michael Muhammad Knight could be fun.

        Euthanatos - I'm sure there are some cool assassins, but I'm not up on it. Two particularly interesting death deities whose followers you could emphasize are the Baron Samedi from Haitian Voudoun (though that's also the territory of the Bata'a craft), and Kali, the Hindu goddess of destruction.
        Last edited by Li Hai; 04-27-2018, 09:38 AM.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by Saikou View Post
          I am now imagining a Verbena sect made entirely out of dentists who frequently commune with a literal tooth fairy, offering sacrifices of pulled teeth.
          Don't rule them out having Ecstatic or other allies who make braces for people who want a grill.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by Li Hai View Post

            Euthanatos - I'm sure there are some cool assassins, but I'm not up on it. Lee Harvey Oswald?
            They are hard men making hard choices, those who talk to ghosts and see that they solve their problems

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            • #36
              Originally posted by baakyocalder View Post

              Don't rule them out having Ecstatic or other allies who make braces for people who want a grill.
              The ecstatic would be the anaesthetists.


              Keepers of the Wyck: A Chronicle I'm running FINALE: Chapter 39: Green Fairy

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              • #37
                Idk what the bump policy is, but I was kinda proud of my post ITT

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                • #38
                  Ahmad Suradji : Fallen Dreamspeaker or Verbena

                  Hupini of the Whanganui: I'm leaning towards Akashic because of the Correspondence aspect of most of his famous workings, but maybe Dreamspeaker.....or Verbena as a famous healer...


                  Pemulwuy: Verbena or Euthanatos.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Li Hai View Post

                    Euthanatos - I'm sure there are some cool assassins, but I'm not up on it. Two particularly interesting death deities whose followers you could emphasize are the Baron Samedi from Haitian Voudoun (though that's also the territory of the Bata'a craft), and Kali, the Hindu goddess of destruction.
                    Modern real world assassins that are known by name tend to be either professionals who are amoral sociopaths in it for the money (Carlos the Jackal, for example, or various organized crime hitmen) or one-and-dones who are mentally unstable (most of late 20th century America's political and celebrity killers). The exception are the handful of ex-military or law enforcement snipers who've written books about their experiences, but that's not a subject I've well versed in. It's one of those things where it's easier to find fictional examples, such as the literary version of James Bond, Leon from The Professional (1994), or some of the characters from the anime PsychoPass.

                    As far as Thanatoic deities, the main ones are Shiva and Parvati (especially in her incarnations of Durga and Kali) from Hinduism, Hades and Persephone (as well as many of the other Chthonic gods) of Ancient Greece, all of the various Ghede Loa (especially Papa Ghede and Mama Brigitte), Odin and Freya of the Norse, and the dozen or so Irish and Welsh gods associated with death, healing and fate. (Also the Mayan ones, but I really don't know enough about them. Likewise for West Africa.)




                    What is tolerance? It is the consequence of humanity. We are all formed of frailty and error; let us pardon reciprocally each other's folly. That is the first law of nature.
                    Voltaire, "Tolerance" (1764)

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by No One of Consequence View Post

                      Modern real world assassins that are known by name tend to be either professionals who are amoral sociopaths in it for the money (Carlos the Jackal, for example, or various organized crime hitmen) or one-and-dones who are mentally unstable (most of late 20th century America's political and celebrity killers). The exception are the handful of ex-military or law enforcement snipers who've written books about their experiences, but that's not a subject I've well versed in. It's one of those things where it's easier to find fictional examples, such as the literary version of James Bond, Leon from The Professional (1994), or some of the characters from the anime PsychoPass.

                      As far as Thanatoic deities, the main ones are Shiva and Parvati (especially in her incarnations of Durga and Kali) from Hinduism, Hades and Persephone (as well as many of the other Chthonic gods) of Ancient Greece, all of the various Ghede Loa (especially Papa Ghede and Mama Brigitte), Odin and Freya of the Norse, and the dozen or so Irish and Welsh gods associated with death, healing and fate. (Also the Mayan ones, but I really don't know enough about them. Likewise for West Africa.)

                      Don't forget Santa Muerte, Mexico's modern sainted personification of Death herself. (For the record, no, the Catholic Church does not recognize Santa Muerte as a saint. It sees it as a heterodoxy.)

                      REALLY popular these days, among both organized crime and common people. I'm still astounded M20 never introduced her worshipers as a new Euthanatos faction. Instead, it just sort of lumped all latter day Central American death worship under the Nephandi and called it a day. Shame.


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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by Bluecho View Post
                        REALLY popular these days, among both organized crime and common people. I'm still astounded M20 never introduced her worshipers as a new Euthanatos faction. Instead, it just sort of lumped all latter day Central American death worship under the Nephandi and called it a day. Shame.
                        That strikes me as *incredibly* (and downright insultingly) tone-deaf, and reminds me of the certain pre-modern-internet-WW blunders regarding some cultures :|


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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Bluecho View Post
                          REALLY popular these days, among both organized crime and common people. I'm still astounded M20 never introduced her worshipers as a new Euthanatos faction. Instead, it just sort of lumped all latter day Central American death worship under the Nephandi and called it a day. Shame.
                          It is mentioned among the prominent new influences on the Euthanatos on p.146.


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                          • #43
                            Originally posted by Michael View Post

                            It is mentioned among the prominent new influences on the Euthanatos on p.146.
                            Yeah, I checked that.

                            Originally posted by M20 P. 146
                            "...and Mexican Dia de los Muertos decorations..."
                            Not terribly impressed. It's not even about Santa Muerte, but about Dia de los Muertos. In the same ballpark, yes, but not about an actual figure that people venerate actively throughout the year. Rather, just the trappings of a single holiday. Nor do we get any other sort of mentions elsewhere. I don't expect the writers to have gone into huge depth with all the various factions of the Traditions, old and new. Word count was tight and all. I'm just a little peeved that they put more words into the Nephandi faction concerning this region than they did its legitimate practitioners.

                            Like Ambrosia said, Tone-Deaf.


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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by Bluecho View Post
                              Not terribly impressed. It's not even about Santa Muerte, but about Dia de los Muertos. In the same ballpark, yes, but not about an actual figure that people venerate actively throughout the year. Rather, just the trappings of a single holiday. Nor do we get any other sort of mentions elsewhere. I don't expect the writers to have gone into huge depth with all the various factions of the Traditions, old and new. Word count was tight and all. I'm just a little peeved that they put more words into the Nephandi faction concerning this region than they did its legitimate practitioners.

                              Like Ambrosia said, Tone-Deaf.
                              Sure, but the book doesn't go into factions of the Traditions anywhere. Like Madzimbawe gets 3 offhand mentions. The 2 page Euthanatos write-up is entirely Chakravanti focused. in terms of where the Traditions are going, that offhand comment is about as good as it gets for any of them.

                              Also, Los Sangrientos are more just a mess, covering an area far bigger than Santa Muerte, and including what looks like Satanic Panic stuff.


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