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Questioning the "masquerade" on Mage

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  • Questioning the "masquerade" on Mage

    I found this article, very interesting about the limit of trope on narrative and rpg too.
    I am not sure that i am the best person to replicate, if anyone want to give a contribute and is intrigued too as i am, please : more are merrier!
    https://mythcreants.com/blog/five-co...hy-theyre-bad/

  • #2
    Except that's not how it works at all? The technocracy murders mages AND undercuts faith in their paradigm. Thus it becomes harder for them to do things... this isn't complicated. Its basic psychology. People don't have to disbelieve in magic. They just you know.. have to disbelieve BOB can is magic to you know fuck over Bob.

    So maybe people do believe there's a hidden world of magic SOMEWHERE maybe they do believe in lucky socks or what have you, but they don't believe in your paradigm. Not so much. And when they do you get cults and reality zones.

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    • #3
      That article struck me as being written by someone who read two paragraphs of the books or watched a single middle-of-the-season episode of the shows they're referencing and assumed they knew everything about the book or show, the mythology within and how they answered various questions. They're description of how Mage handles the whole "masquerade" was off by a wide margin, complete with the questions they posed to "prove it don't work" already being answered in the setting. And their repeated comparison of a vast array of magical powers to... Electricity? Naw, sorry, really not feeling that.


      Writing up Clanbook: Aabbt

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Vysha View Post
        That article struck me as being written by someone who read two paragraphs of the books or watched a single middle-of-the-season episode of the shows they're referencing and assumed they knew everything about the book or show, the mythology within and how they answered various questions. They're description of how Mage handles the whole "masquerade" was off by a wide margin, complete with the questions they posed to "prove it don't work" already being answered in the setting. And their repeated comparison of a vast array of magical powers to... Electricity? Naw, sorry, really not feeling that.
        Exaclty my impression.
        The author don know anything about Consensus,
        " Speaking of which, why is only magic affected by belief? How did Nicolaus Copernicus prove that the earth rotates around the sun when everyone believed otherwise? If belief changed reality or even just our sensory perception of it, we would still think the Earth is the center of our solar system. If we all decided raccoons were a myth, would they disappear?"
        Really? You never read anything about the moon on this setting?

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        • #5
          Yeah, this is a poorly written all over, but I'll just address the first entry since it talks about Mage. The author raises two issues. The first is that it makes no sense to say magic is held down by lack of belief when you're catering to a fantasy fanbase. This is faulty thinking. People think the ideas in fantasy literature are cool, but don't necessarily believe in them. That's a basic distinction between fiction and non-fiction ingrained in our perception(score one for the technocrats). The author even exemplifies this in entry 3, making a distinction between fantastical rewrites of history and the real tragedies caused by the inquisition.
          The second issue is how were people convinced magic wasn't real. This has been answered in-setting. It's the reason why a group of supernatural economists like the Syndicate exist and are important to the setting: marketing. While old mages were busy with their cults and cliques, witholding knowledge and power, the OoR was selling Enlightened Science as a tool by the people, for the people. The mages tried outmuscling them, but by the time they realized the name of the game, the rug had been swept from under their feet.
          Now, I don't expect the author to know every detail of Mage(or any other media mentioned), but my guess is they just looked it up on tvtropes and glanced through the summary. Warrant they didn't even look at the list of tropes.

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