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Rewriting The Chaos Factor so it doesn't suck

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  • #16
    Samuel Haight is an ashtray. I think I like the original version better...

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    • #17
      Edit: NVM, can't read

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      • #18
        Regarding Samual Haight, I think the question of who he is/was is best examined in stages.

        Phase One: His origin was presented in a bit of fiction by James Moore an issue of White Wolf Magazine. It was basically a psyche interview he'd done with a PENTEX psychologist. In the beginning, he's a Child of Gaia Kinfolk, his father being one of the Garou. His father constantly belittled and berated him as a failure for not being a Garou the way his cousin was. (And IIRC one night, while riding with his father in their pick up truck, they were in a wreck and his dad was decapitated.) So he's fairly psychologically damaged and has a massive compulsion to prove himself better than werewolves. In his mind, this means being able to hunt and kill anything that he comes across. So after hunting every dangerous animal on earth, he decided to start hunting monsters. As part of this, he started learning magic. (While this was originally presented as Vampire's Thaumaturgy discipline, I'm of the opinion that Sorcery/Path Magic is a better choice.) He's hunted vampires, witches, mutants/fomori/devil-eaten, bygones, and other things. And, having learned the tainted Rite of Sacred Rebirth, he's started hunting and skinning werewolves.
        (A question to decide on here is whether or not he has become a ghoul, taking blood from the vampire's he kills to gain access to some of their powers. Given that the rules from Ghouls: Fatal Addiction limit ghouls to only the first dot of disciplines unless they regularly ingest the blood of elders, who are a much harder target, I'm not sure it's really worth it.)

        Phase Two: Having murdered and skinned five werewolves and completing the Rite of Sacred Rebirth, he's now a pseudo-werewolf. Supposedly when realizing that what he'd done had made him Wyrm-tainted, he fled into the Deep Umbra. I'm not sure I really buy the idea that he did everything he did while being totally oblivious to it's spiritual ramifications. He's motivated by an intense hatred of his father and by extension the Garou, and I think he'd be perfectly aware of the consequences of his actions. I think a more likely scenario is that he was largely unmoved, and instead went exploring the Deep Umbra in search of more power. And in this fashion he encountered Ischin, an ancient ... well, it was initially described as a Wyrm spirit, but it could just as easily be some form of demon or the like. And it could be that Ischin was the one that showed Haight a potential way to steal a Mage's Avatar and their ability to use Sphere Magic. If so, apparently one of the keys to this trick was to first acquire the high powered fetish known as the Conquistador's Sword from a werewolf in the Amazon. He then used it on the first major target of opportunity, the Gilded King (referred to as El Dorado by Europeans). Unfortunately for Haight, his target is too powerful, destroying the Sword and only giving Haight access to a fraction of his power.
        (Since he's not a "real" Mage, my personal theory is that the Gilded King's stolen Avatar has been unwillingly enslaved by Haight and probably spiritually "chained" to the Frankenstein patchwork of stolen Garou spirit essence that allows him to fake being a werewolf. This may make it more difficult for him to work Sphere Magic than it would for a regular Mage.)

        Phase Three: Now that he's got a stolen Avatar to let him pretend to be a Mage, Haight goes to the Cromby farm and destroys their sacred tree to create a unique corrupt artifact that allows him to mimic having an Arete rating to help manage and power his stolen Avatar. He further amped this staff up by using it to drain a Chantry's node as a way to keep him fed with Quintessence. So now he can - IMO with some difficulty as he probably has to fight his Avatar to keep it in line - act as an Adept level Mage.

        Phase Four (Endgame): At some point in hunting and studying vampires, Haight has very likely come across the story of what happened with the Tremere and thinks it is possible to turn himself into a vampire in order to become immortal, and probably by using his staff as an anchor, not lose his Avatar (and probably not the spiritual aspect of his werewolf nature either) the way a normal embraced mage (or werewolf) would. And somehow he's figured out the location of this ancient vampire blood god in Mexico City, to serve as his target.

        At this point, Haight is probably completely bat-shit crazy. Just personally, I think it would be fitting to give him a variation of the Sanguinary Animism Derangement from revised Vampire, in which he is constantly "haunted" by the five Garou he murdered to become a Skin Dancer, as well as the talking severed head of his father, and the Gilded King (and his Avatar, especially if you want to give it the Manifest Avatar merit), and probably other oddities. He's certainly got Antisocial Personality Disorder, and probably Megalomania or Overcompensation.
        He's probably totally unable to work Sphere Magic if separated from his staff. It might also be fitting to give him some form of the Conditional Magic flaw, making his magic useless against say werewolves, or anyone carrying gold or silver. Echoes might also be suitable.


        What is tolerance? It is the consequence of humanity. We are all formed of frailty and error; let us pardon reciprocally each other's folly. That is the first law of nature.
        Voltaire, "Tolerance" (1764)

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        • #19
          Incidentally, in hindsight, I think it might be more interesting if the vampire Haight is trying to find in Mexico City actually is Huitzilopochtli, one of the Drowned, rather than a Baali.


          What is tolerance? It is the consequence of humanity. We are all formed of frailty and error; let us pardon reciprocally each other's folly. That is the first law of nature.
          Voltaire, "Tolerance" (1764)

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