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  • The rule of half

    Disclosure: still haven’t hopped onto V5 yet so idk what they did yet.

    Was tired of whiffing cause the dice gods are cruel. Plus it slowed the game down.

    So I basically assigned the rule of half. Dice pool divided by 2 equals success. Then add 1 to 4 depending on specialty status. Then add or subtract by 1 per difficulty shift.

    One player suggested keeping that then subtracting 1 at the end to encourage rolling.

    Question for the group is do you foresee any problem with this option?

  • #2
    That, minus the adding and subtracting, is basically what V5 does by the book.

    The idea probably doesn't map too exactly onto the actual probabilities when it comes to different difficulty levels, but if it works for you, go for it!

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Pnizzle View Post
      Disclosure: still haven’t hopped onto V5 yet so idk what they did yet.

      Was tired of whiffing cause the dice gods are cruel. Plus it slowed the game down.

      So I basically assigned the rule of half. Dice pool divided by 2 equals success. Then add 1 to 4 depending on specialty status. Then add or subtract by 1 per difficulty shift.

      One player suggested keeping that then subtracting 1 at the end to encourage rolling.

      Question for the group is do you foresee any problem with this option?
      Take half is basically the freeform mechanism of the game. The rest is your own method, but that's fine if it works for you.

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      • #4
        Oh they did? Nice. Wonder what else they tweaked. I still have to figure out social challenges like the seemingly underpowered expression skill.

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        • #5
          The idea behind taking half is the same as the old taking 10 from D&D 3rd Ed. If a character has a good enough competency and needs to succeed at a task unburdened by serious consequences for failure, then should be able to simply succeed. A seasoned hacker shouldn't have a risk of failure for backdooring into a web server run by Joanne's Pumpkin Emporium. Now if the GM knew Joanne's Pumpkin Emporium is a front for the Mafia and runs solid ICE software, then there for sure you'd need a roll. Because failure means that hacker is f*cked.

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          • #6
            This rule of half has been working out so far. Mooks get pummeled by the players. And the players are afraid of anyone they KNOW is a badass for whatever reason. "Dont talk to that guy, he'll sell an ice cube to an eskimo and make you pay the interest rates for it."

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            • #7
              I instituted this in my games a while ago. I assume NPCs get average results on all dice rolls outside of physical combat. PCs can also choose to "take half" in situations where they aren't unduly stressed or distracted.

              I can count on one hand the number of times PCs have chosen to take half, but it's worked out wonderfully. Not rolling dice for NPCs speeds things up on my end and also makes PC dice rolls matter more. If a PC rolls super high, there's no chance an NPC will also roll super high and invalidate the result. If a PC rolls super low, they also can't count on an NPC rolling low to bail them out.


              Blood and Bourbon, my New Orleans-based Vampire chronicle.

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