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Am I wrong how Blood Sorcery works?

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  • #46
    Originally posted by Lian View Post
    I would argue the bigger issue with Thaum is less paths and that.. xp costs for rituals is an optional thing and only was added later on. So the "Infinite magic tricks" issue comes down to yeah maybe a player doesn't have the xp to learn every path but its kind of hard to balance how easy it is to learn rituals without an xp cost.
    I'd agree with that.

    Also that Thaum has very little "Theme" vs being "MAGIC" while say.. Necro is clearly a strong thematic niche that doesn't basically do a little of everything.
    Well, since Thaum have grown out of one of the Houses of hermes going vamp and applying their knowledge to the manipulation of blood to take back some of what they've lost with True Magick, while Necromancy is more like a Sorcerer path, as in, a very specialized magical tradition, I'd say it's fitting.


    If nothing worked, then let's think!

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    • #47
      Originally posted by PMárk View Post

      I'd agree with that.




      Well, since Thaum have grown out of one of the Houses of hermes going vamp and applying their knowledge to the manipulation of blood to take back some of what they've lost with True Magick, while Necromancy is more like a Sorcerer path, as in, a very specialized magical tradition, I'd say it's fitting.
      This is both an issue In Universe and Oocly. IN universe the Order of Hermes has specializations in the Dark ages. You'll notice whether its DA or Ars there's shit the Order can't do that other mages can. More to the point EACH HOUSE has specializations that its good at. SO the Tremere not being "generically magical" need not be a thing.

      And OOCly "magic has no specialization" is kind of a shitty position. It removes any sense of flavor.

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      • #48
        Writing a longer response later, but for now I'll say this om rituals:

        One cost I love, that enhances both feeling of magic as expensive, difficult and distinct, is ritual components.
        A lot of fluff is skipped over when reading rituals, because players want to get to that juicy "system" section. This is unfortunate, as a lot of fun can be had from the search for strange materials.

        To bring up some fun examples:
        The blood of two still-living twins.
        Three silver wedding rings.
        A stillborn fetus.
        Blood, hair and fingernails from the intended target.
        Wood that nourished itself on corpses.
        Re-enacting an urban legend.
        A noose used to hang a murderer.

        Just to name a few.
        All of these have interesting stories lined up, and quite a few have morality checks too, if you do it the easy way...

        Point being that you should always strive to make your magic feel like it costs something, especially rituals, which normally cost no XP.


        Furthermore, I believe Carthage should be destroyed.

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        • #49
          Originally posted by moogle001 View Post

          As far as I can tell the idea of magic being able to do everything and better arises from D&D. I haven't read any literary series where magic can just do everything, cost or not. Gandalf is the archetypical wizard of fantasy, yet magic is only used a handful of times in the Lord of the Rings.
          Tolkein's works are awash in magic, it's virtually everywhere...at least when it comes to the "high races" -- elves, dwarves, men of Numenor and their descendants. What's rare, is "wiggle your fingers and supernatural thing happens" magic, which is only reserved to the elf lords and ladies of old as the lowest rung of power. Where magic is genuinely to be found in Tolkein, is in the act of creation, cultivation, growth, and shaping. The craftsperson imbues their works with the essence of their spirit, those works contain power (for good or ill) of their own right, and reflect the inner nature and power of their creator. It's important to note this is not necessarily a reductive process for the craftsperson, their works, or those who enjoy use of them.

          Contrast Lothlorien and Greenwood. They were both magical forests cultivated by elves. Lothlorien consisted of inherently-magical Mallorn trees, and it was cultivated by the elves and Galadriel's use of Nenya as a supplement. Greenwood was a native forest, but took on magical power thanks to the elves' habitation and cultivation. Greenwood was corrupted by Sauron's presence and became Mirkwood due to his presence in Dol Guldur, in the lack of a counter-weight in the form of an elf lord of old bearing a ring of power (Thranduil was powerful, but not "Silmarillion powerful" as Galadriel or Elrond were). Meanwhile, Galadriel and Celeborn were OG pipe-hitting, Balrog- and dragon-slaying motherfuckers from the Old Country, and Galadriel had a Ring of Power and the will to use it without becoming corrupt in the process; thus, did Lothlorien resist Sauron's influence despite being closer to Dol Guldur and higher on Sauron's shit list than the Halls of Thranduil.

          The closest analog you get to that in WoD is found in WtA and MtAs with Nodes/Caerns, and fetishes/wonders.

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