Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

[Literature] Clan Novel and other book discussion thread

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • [Literature] Clan Novel and other book discussion thread



    There have been a lot of developments for the re-release of the Clan Novels and Dark Age by Crossroad Press. Also, there's now a bunch of books coming out from Onyx Path, including a Chicago anthology. So I thought this would be a good thread to create. Discuss anything releated to Vampire: The Masquerade's fiction over the years. Except Eternal Hearts.

    LOL.

    I recently got my paperback copies of the Clan Novels and have been enjoying a re-read. Then I'm going to do the Grail Covenant trilogy and Dark Age Clan Novels.

    Comparison of the New To The Old: https://imgur.com/a/YO6CglF

    Where to get the books: https://crossroadpress.com/product-category/white-wolf/

    I like the matte finish and high quality paper but this means that I had to buy a completely new set for my shelf as they don't fit with my old books.

    HERE'S MY REVIEWS OF THE BOOKS SO FAR:

    Clan Novel: Toreador
    Clan Novel: Tzimisce
    Last edited by CTPhipps; 06-13-2019, 03:50 PM.

  • CTPhipps
    replied
    All of the Dark Ages Clan Novels are now back available for purchase.

    https://crossroadpress.com/product-c...e-wolf/page/2/

    Leave a comment:


  • CTPhipps
    replied


    http://booknest.eu/reviews/charles/1...nnovellasombra

    4/5

    LASOMBRA is the sixth novel in the Clan Novel series that began with TOREADOR and will continue until it reaches thirteen volumes with a bonus anthology. It is the trademark series of Vampire: The Masquerade and was written roughly between the end of 2nd Edition and the beginning of its Revised. Gehenna, the apocalypse of vampires, is nigh with a war being fought between both the Camarilla (evil vampires) and the Sabbat (eviller vampires).

    The books were originally published in 1999 but have since been reprinted by Crossroad Press as part of a deal with Paradox Interactive (new owner of the White World roleplaying game company). This was my favorite of the books originally but my tastes have changed a bit in twenty years. Some things I enjoyed about the book earlier like the action are now less important than the character-building while I now wish for more focus the lead's motivations. Something I feel this book was a bit lacking on.

    Lasombra features the arguably most popular of all Vampire: The Masquerade characters, Lucita of Aragon. A literal Spanish Princess from the Dark Ages, Lucita was Embraced by her disgusting sire Moncada in order to satisfy his lusts. Moncada was a holy churchman as well as a vampire and Lucita found herself rebelling against him as both sire as well as spiritual leader. Centuries later, she earns her living as a paid assassin of the undead.

    Lucita is hired by a mysterious employer (possibly multiple mysterious employers) who wishes her to kill a number of high-ranking Lasombra agents crucial to the military efforts of the Sabbat. She is also supposed to kill one of the three Archbishops that will cripple the invasion of the East Coast by her clan. Lucita has no loyalty to either her Clan or the Sabbat and mostly just wants to collect her expensive fee.

    Much of the book is devoted to the lengths the Camarilla is willing to take to slow the Sabbat's advance on Baltimore. They start abandoning their less valuable cities, mass Embracing cannon fodder and leaving them to die despite this being against their cardinal beliefs. Theo Bell and the Princes are utterly unrepentant about this, considering their victory worth any costs. They also move away anyone "important" among their kind.

    On the Sabbat side of things, we follow an ambitious young Pack Leader named MacEllen who is eager to prove himself as a potential leader of the sect by completing impossible orders. MacEllen believes he's being sent to his death, unaware the Sabbat is aware of all the Camarilla's secret movements due to a secret Lasombra among their ranks. The most important character in the book, even more than Lucita in some ways, is Talley the Hound who is the Sabbat's greatest assassin and reluctantly assigned to stop but not kill Lucita. This is on the order of Moncada, her lecherous and vile sire who is now a high-ranking member of the Sabbat.

    If the story sounds convoluted, it really isn't as it progresses from point to point and allows you to soak up in the complicated power games between the two sects. In many ways, it is a much more Jyhad-esque (what vampires call their political games before the word would become uncomfortable to use due to the War on Terror) than the Ventrue Clan novel. Games within games, wheels within wheels.

    There's some really good moments spread throughout the book like a young Nosferatu Neonate's giddiness at the opportunity to Embrace and torture a dozen handsome young men like the kind she used to hang out with, Talley's world-weariness at having to deal with so many idiots in the Sabbat heirarchy, and Moncada's depraved paternalism to Lucita despite how thoroughly she's rejected him. This is in-between some really well-written action sequences that incorporate vampire Disciplines, emotion, and twists.

    Unfortunately, the biggest weakness of the book is Lucita herself. For a character so beloved, she spends most of the book in a state of perpetual anger and disdain for everyone around her. There's not much character development for her and while she does a large number of impressive stunts, we don't get much of her character other than, "Don't piss her off." Talley, her opponent, actually gets the meat of the character development.

    Lasombra is an okay installment in the series but not up there with Setite or Gangrel. Both of those books heavily focused on the character development of its protagonists. Even Ventrue had a lot more insight into who its main character was. Lucita mostly remains a mystery but she sure does look cool killing people.

    Leave a comment:


  • CTPhipps
    replied
    Just finished Clan Novel: Lasombra.

    I also have proofed Dark Ages: Malkavian and Dark Ages: Brujah for Crossroad Press, so those should be available soon.

    Leave a comment:


  • CTPhipps
    replied
    A review of CLAN NOVEL: VENTRUE is up now.

    http://booknest.eu/reviews/charles/1580-ventrue



    4.5/5

    CLAN NOVEL: VENTRUE by Gherbod Fleming is the fifth novel of the Vampire: The Masquerade Clan Novel series. It is a series published in 1999 and told a thirteen novel story about the conflict between Sabbat (bad vampires) invading the cities belonging to the Camarilla (less bad vampires). A magical artifact called the Eye of Hazimel was serving as a wild card during it and each new book's protagonist was a glimpse into one of the individual undead's journey. Each book also served as an illustration about what a specific clan was all about.

    Clan Ventrue is the vampire clan of nobles, knights, politicians, and executives. Serving as the suave leaders of the Camarilla, they've always been somewhat vanilla compared to other Clans. Many of the great villains of the setting have been Ventrue like Prince Lodin, Hardelstadt the Younger, and Sebastian La Croix. They've also been the protagonists of many works like Prince Julian Luna from the ill-fated Kindred the Embraced. This book does a decent job exploring the contrast of the Ventrue's affable leadership contrasted to their dark entitled self. They may not be as exciting a set of leaders as the Lasombra, Tzimisce, Toreador, or Tremere but they get the job done.

    The premise of this novel is that we get a sense of how the Camarilla is responding to the Sabbat's successful invasion of over a dozen cities. The Fall of Atlanta was terrible but it is the fall of Washington D.C. that has caused the Camarilla to panic. Well, perhaps panic is not the best word as the Inner Council sends not even a Justicar to defend the New World's cities but a single representative in Jan Pieterzoon. The city of Baltimore, Maryland becomes the establishment's new headquarters with the arrogant Prince Garlotte as the new defender of "civilized" vampiredom. Jan must work with Prince Garlotte, refugee demagogue Victoria Ash, archon Theo Bell, and the mysterious Prince Marcus Vitel to try to stop the Sabbat onslaught.

    A major theme of the book is how the Ventrue appear to be caring leaders but are awful people underneath. Ironically, I think Garlotte actually works better than cover character Jan Pieterzoon in establishing this. Garlotte is a self-absorbed administrator who isn't anywhere near the most powerful Prince in America but threatens to turn the entire defense into his own personal army. Despite this, he's actually fairly lenient with his childer and is humanized in his lust with Victoria Ash as well as genuine desire to turn back the Sabbat. In the end, he has to choose whether he must continue being a soft touch or destroy the things he loves in life for power. Given this is the World of Darkness, his choice shouldn't come as a surprise but somehow does.

    Jan Pierterzoon is the protagonist of the books and a character I have mixed feelings on. He appears to be a somewhat ignorant (not believing in the Antediluvians) herald for his sire but one of the least horrible vampires we've met so far. This is subverted when he find out what Jan's feeding restriction (which all Ventrue suffer from) is. He can only prey upon certain types of people and the realization is suitably nightmarish. On the other hand, it feels a bit cheap as well as if they wanted a way to show that Jan had a dark side and went with the most obviously "bad" thing they could. The way he fetishizes trauma victims is also more relevant now when criticizing self-styled "heroes" that we understand things a bit better than the Nineties.

    This is an intensely political book with lots of backstabbing, manipulation, and seduction. Surprisingly, this is probably the best book for Victoria Ash of Clan Novel: Toreador. While she plays the role of femme fatale, using her Presence to bring lust back into the hearts of Kindred who have long since abandoned the need for sexual urges, she's also someone trying to recover from torture at the hands of the Tzimisce. This includes her killing some fifteen or sixteen mortals to repair the horrible damage done both internally as well as externally. Not all scars can be healed with the blood, though, and she struggles to regain control over her life. She's a much more interesting character this way and it's a shame the book doesn't have more scenes about her.

    There's some strange elements to the book that don't quite jive with the tabletop RPG. For example, Jan Pieterzoon is extremely concerned about needing surgery to reset his leg and other issues but the vast majority of vampires, barring Final Death, just need to spend more blood. He's also a very strange choice to lead the defense of the New World versus any Justicar or someone with military experience. That's part of the point but the reason why they send Hardestadt's errand boy is never made clear. Also, Jan spends much of the book running and injured, which is weird for an Elder who has a superpower specifically related to not getting injured.

    I also appreciate the fact that we get insight into Prince Garlotte's brood of childer. Isaac, Fin, and Katrina who add a new dimension to Clan Ventrue. Isaac is the somewhat dull and uninspired but extremely loyal Sheriff. Fin is the romantic vampire teenager deeply in love with his girlfriend Morena but unaware just how much danger he's put her in. Katrina is a lesbian in a polyamorous relationship that was Embraced to be a substitute for the Prince's wife.

    In conclusion, I really enjoyed this book but I feel like Jan Pieterzoon is actually the biggest weakness in it. While Garlotte and his brood is fascinating, Jan is somewhat one-dimensionally loyal to the Camarilla with a disgusting weakness. I actually wanted to get back to the Prince and his childer or Victoria Ash's scheming for the majority of the book.
    Last edited by CTPhipps; 08-07-2019, 02:57 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • CTPhipps
    replied
    DARK AGES: LASOMBRA w/ Lucita is now available on Kindle and paperback.

    Leave a comment:


  • CTPhipps
    replied
    Here's another review up.

    Anyone minding me posting these or should I just provide links?



    http://booknest.eu/reviews/charles/1565-clannovelsetite

    5/5

    The Followers of Set hold a special place in my heart. They are the Set-worshiping, Caine-rejecting vampires who went from being one of the most ridiculous Clans in Vampire: The Masquerade to one of my all-time favorites. Presently, they hold a number #2 position for me in the setting with only Clan Malkavian ranking higher in people I'd want to be Embraced by. The Followers of Set are a group that is easy to get wrong but amazing if you get them right and a large part of why I love them is due to this book.

    When they were originally created for the Vampire: The Masquerade Player's Handbook, they were essentially designed as one-note villains based on Robert E. Howard's Conan the Barbarian. More precisely, they were based on the John Milinus movie interpretation of those works. Thulsa Doom as played by James Earl Jones turned into a snake, had a cult of drug and sex-addicted followers, plus worshiped a god of evil. Vampire: The Masquerade: Redemption even had a Setite temple as a place you massacred them in order to rescue Toreador sex slaves. No, no Cristof, the Toreador are the Setite's customers.

    Eventually, the Followers of Set were essentially reimagined as Lavey-ian Satanists with a dash of Gnostic theism as well as a freshman philosophy student's understanding of Nieztsche. The Followers of Set hate the world and blame the gods for how awful it's become. They set themselves up against all that is good, just, and pure in the world because they see these things as social traps. Only by embracing transgression and freeing yourself from the shackles of human morality can you become the truest kind of vampire you can be.

    As I've grown older, I've developed a certain disdain for the Sabbat that increases simultaneously while my respect for the Setites grows. The Sabbat have much the same rhetoric as the Setites. They're both vampire death cults that argue vampires should cast aside their humanity to embrace (*rimshot*) posthuman morality. However, the Sabbat strike me as poseurs by comparison. The Setites have been doing this for 10,000 years and are very good at the intellectual study of evil and why it's a better thing than good. I grok their message and think they're the only group aside from the Children of Haqim that can coherently explain what a Path of Enlightenment is as well as why you should follow one.

    This is all due to Hesha Ruhadze.

    Hesha is one of the two stars of CLAN NOVEL: SETITE with the other being the more conventional Elizabeth Dimitrios. Hesha is the antithesis of the original Setites who could not have been more overt in their villainy. Hesha dresses stylishly, talks rationally, and lacks the vast majority of Elder snootiness that turns most Neonates Anarch until they age into power of their own. Indeed, if you met Hesha in-game, you'd probably consider him a fairly cool NPC that could be relied upon in a jam.

    Hesha is a monster.

    Hesha's a monster that realizes what almost no other Devil figures in literature do and the best way to destroy someone is to give them exactly what they want with no word twisting or sudden but inevitable betrayals. Hesha manipulates, lies, and destroys the lives of those around him like a boss. He does it in such a way that the people around him believe he's their good friend and are grateful for his corruption of their souls. Hesha isn't their friend but he's happy to play the role if it gets him what he wants. Making Thompson respect him as his mentor and Elizabeth love him are the equivalent of giving dogs a treat in order to train them. Hesha keeps his tools sharp and in comfort while emotionally dependent on him.

    Elizabeth is a good protagonist as she serves in the thankless role of being the "normal" one who has to get to know Hesha and fall for his charms. She's believable, though, and a human character who doesn't suck. There's a lot of tension that doesn't normally exist in vampire romance fiction because the vampire in question is usually a teddy bear with fangs. Elizabeth avoids being aggressively stupid or romantic like quite a few vampire romance heroines.
    When she realizes what she's trapped in a relationship with, it's quite impressive the lengths she goes to in order to survive.

    Clan Novel: Setite is probably the best of the Clan Novels and it's kind of hilarious in our post-Twilight era that it reads as a well-written parody of that kind of fiction. The story is framed as a love story between Elizabeth and Hesha. She's a young art historian and restorer who meets the handsome yet mysterious Hesha while slowly coming to realize that he holds some dark secret.

    The dark secret is not that he's a vampire: Hesha dangles that truth in front of her so she believes he's opening up to him. No, that secret is that Hesha is a predator that cannot love and is perfectly able to fake normal human emotions. Ramona and Zhavon are a love story that can never be because the Beast destroys true love. Hesha and Elizabeth are a love story that can never be because if all your instincts tell you a man is a master manipulator as well as practiced liar--then he probably is.

    The big appeal of this novel is that it is a fairly self-contained story that actually gives good insight into how to run a specific clan. It avoids all the various cliches that were (then) associated with the Followers of Set and creates a new canon for how they should be run. I've run EXPYs of Hesha in several of my games and even stole his character as the basis for a PC. The book works well as both a stand-alone as well as a greater part of the series, giving more reason why we should care about the Eye of Hazimel plot than Leopold the Gangrel Slayer ever did. It also chooses subtlety as its weapon versus the overt action movie fights that predominate in this series. This is one of the must reads of the Clan Novel set. Thank goodness Crossroad Press has re-released the Clan Novels (along with the Dark Ages Clan Novels and Grail Covenant trilogy).
    Last edited by CTPhipps; 08-07-2019, 02:58 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • CTPhipps
    replied
    I'm pleased to say the 1st and 2nd novel of the Dark Ages Clan Novel, NOSFERATU and ASSAMITE, is now available on Kindle and paperback (Amazon hasn't merged the two yet for some reason). The third novel is coming out tomorrow.

    DA Nosferatu: https://www.amazon.com/Dark-Ages-Cla...dp/B07SBWWPSG/

    DA Assamite: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07TGKLP6H/
    https://www.amazon.com/dp/1950565505/

    Leave a comment:


  • CTPhipps
    replied


    http://booknest.eu/reviews/charles/1559-gangrel


    4.5/5

    It's interesting how re-reading a book can change your opinion of it as well as reveal elements you were blind to on your first read-through. I read Clan Novel Gangrel in June 1999 at the age of 19. I had recently dispersed myself of fundamentalism for liberal Christianity (yes, a fundamentalist Vampire: The Masquerade player) and was only beginning to become aware of the diversity in the world around me.

    When I first read the novel, I was primarily absorbed in Ramona's journey through the troubling world of Kindred society. For me, it was an action-adventure novel where a Kindred without knowledge of the Traditions, Clans, Camarilla, Anarchs, or Sabbat did her best to navigate an impossible situation. Ultimately, the book culminated in her confrontation with the newly-transformed Leopold and indirectly led to the events that caused the Gangrel to depart the Camarilla. I was focused on Ramona's status as a Neonate vampire and her journey into becoming a more rounded (anti)heroic figure. Basically, the Heroes' Journey as defined by Joseph Campbell.

    It's only now, twenty years later, that I re-read the novel and realize the first half is actually an LGBT romance. I feel like kicking myself for not realizing this and I'm actually quite interested in the storyline presented within. Zhavon is a young African American girl who is out meeting her boyfriend when she's nearly raped and murdered before Ramona comes to her rescue in a decidedly undead Punisher-esque way. Ramona proceeds to start stalking Zhavon afterward as the young woman struggles to process what she witnessed.

    As the fact I didn't realize this was a romance originally indicates, this is not a traditional love story. Zhavon and Ramona don't even share more than a few words throughout the story. It certainly does not end with them riding off into the sunset (spoilers). No, it is actually a character exploration of Ramona becoming fascinated with a woman who makes her feel human again. It is love for a woman who reminds her so strongly of her mortal self that there is a deep desire to become closer. A desire that can only end in Ramona either turning her or killing her. Except, Ramona doesn't know how to turn a human into a vampire yet.

    The first half of the novel is easily the best part and I wish we could have gotten more of Ramona and Zhavon. The real heart of the story is Ramona trying to get back in touch with her humanity and what reminded her of it but being tempted to destroy that very thing. The Beast only sees food where Ramona sees what she wished she could be. I think Twilight would have been a pretty good horror novella if Edward had eaten Bella in the woods because he couldn't control himself. Stephanie Meyer wouldn't be able to buy her own moon-sized battle station but I think romance, death, and self-destruction are themes V:TM can do well.

    The other half of the book is basically Hatchet 2 (Awesome but terrible movie w/ a great lead - Danielle Harris probably has a restraining order against me given my search history about her). It's a monster hunt after an initial encounter with Leopold the Toreador turns into a massacre. I actually regret some of the deaths in the book and that's a sign the author has done a good job in establishing the characters they've chosen to kill off.

    Basically, Zhavon is kidnapped for somewhat contrived reasons by Leopold (his insanity has made her his "muse" and at this point I can only assume it is Hazimel screwing with a couple of Neonates for the evulz). Ramona attempts to rescue her and things go from bad to worse, getting Xavier the Justicar to go after Leopold despite the vampire having the power of an Antediluvian in his "Eye of Vecna"-esque artifact. It's basically a monster hunt with everyone severely underestimating what they're facing.

    Random aside: despite Hazimel being a Ravnos, Leopold actually displays the powers of a Tzimisce with both Vicissitude and Koldunic Sorcery. Then again, Chimestry is basically, "Warp Reality" at higher levels so I suppose it doesn't matter. Either way, it's interesting to read a novel about an all-powerful fantasy artifact in a relatively grounded setting like the World of Darkness. Epic Magical items aren't usually a thing but they are in this series.

    The book gives an excellent view of how Gangrel society functions with Ramona being forced to survive on her own while her sire stalks her. It's probably the same relationship she has with Zhavon, only he had the knowledge to make a Gangrel from the person he loved from afar. The supporting cast do their job and it's nice to see Xavier presented as an initially heroic figure only to show the dark underbelly that all Justicars possess.

    In conclusion, this is easily my favorite of the Clan Novels so far and one of my favorites in the series as a whole. It's really two different novels, though with the character study of Ramona's hunger to be and be with someone she cannot touch without destroying as the first part while the second is a attempt to destroy the monster Leopold has become. As a teenager, I was much more interested in the second but as an adult, I'm much more interested in the first.
    Last edited by CTPhipps; 08-07-2019, 02:58 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • CTPhipps
    replied


    http://booknest.eu/reviews/charles/1547-tzimisce


    3.5/5

    CLAN NOVEL: TZIMISCE is the second novel in the Clan Novel series by White Wolf games. Originally published in 1999, it and the rest of the series have been reprinted for their 20th anniversary by Crossroad Press. They're available in a new trade paperback edition and Kindle format. I remember reading these back when I was 18 years old, a Goth kid in Kentucky, and so edgy that you could shave with me. Sisters of Mercy was the coolest, ooo! So, do the books hold up two decades later? Let's find out.

    The premise of the Clan Novels is the evil Sabbat, vampire terrorists, have invaded Atlanta, Georgia in order to take it from their rivals in Camarilla. The Camarilla is only marginally better than the Sabbat in overall moral terms but are far less violent, sadistic, and gross. The Sabbat aren't stopping at the conquest of Atlanta, though. They plan to move on throughout Georgia, the Carolinas, and even into Washington D.C.

    Whereas CLAN NOVEL: TOREADOR followed the beginning of the invasion from the perspective of the humane (seeming) Camarilla, Clan Novel: Tzimsice gives us the perspective of the Sabbat. We see their Crusade from the grunts on the ground to the behind the scenes plotting of its leaders as well as bits from Tzimisce signature character Sascha Vykos.

    Sascha Vykos is a character who has undergone a series of revisions across her 20 year history. A member of the mortal House Tremere of magi 800 years ago, she was a transwoman in the Dark Ages who was embraced by their rivals in the Tzimisce. The clan of flesh-crafters allowed her to become the way she wanted to be and indulge her transhuman impulses but was somewhat troubled by the fact the Tzimisce clan was also the most inhuman, sadistic, and overtly evil vampires in the setting (aside from the Baali).

    The character of Vykos was revisited in Beckett's Jyhad Diary in 2018 with some smart souls realizing that maybe it wasn't the best idea to have the most prominent trans character in the setting being a flesh-mutilating torture master. Sascha was revealed to have been mind-controlled by a much-older and more evil Methuselah (The Dracon) and finally freed herself from its control. She wasn't a good person by any stretch of the imagination but was no longer a shock character. But how was Vykos treated in this book? Surprisingly well.

    Eric Griffin doesn't require much adjustment as the Sascha Vykos presented in this book isn't played for shock value but presented as a powerful dangerous vampire woman. I suspect Eric may have picked up on the Unfortunate ImplicationsTM better than other writers and chose to make her a respectable villain. Sascha is always referred to as a woman, takes the form of Elizabeth Bathory for the entirety of the book, and is probably the most "respectable" Sabbat in the story. So, kudos to you, Eric.

    Vykos is a terrible person who plays sadistic games with the rest of the characters in the book but there's a panache to the character as she tricks a Assamite into lowering his guard long enough for her to kill him, manipulates her rivals into destroying themselves, and manages to bring down the defenses of Atlanta without sacrificing any of her pawns. She even manages to bring down Marcus Vitel, the most powerful Kindred in the New World, though that would prove to be a temporary victory. I quite enjoyed the flirtacious letters between her and Vitel as the two ancient vampires enjoyed a duel of intellectual equals.

    The rest of the Tzimisce in the book are less impressive as it is shown the Sabbat are a crude, cultureless band vampires more at home in From Dusk til Dawn or Near Dark than Interview with a Vampire. If you're looking for a work that portrays the Sabbat in a morally ambiguous or even heroic light then this is far from it. They're constantly at each other's throats, betray each other at the drop of a hat, and indulge in sick torture games as a matter of course. They even kill one of the Black Sisters from D.C. by Night and that's a shame since they were among my favorite NPCs.

    Strangely, my favorite character in this book is Victoria Ash rather than any of the Tzimisce. The poor Toreador Primogen of Atlanta has only a small role but she is struggling to keep her sanity while being tortured by a vampire who has adopted the appearance of a Picasso abstract. Certainly, it's easier to root for the victim of torture to escape rather than the person doing the torture.

    In conclusion, this isn't my favorite of the Clan Novels and if you're a fan of the intellectual inhumanity of the Sabbat then you'll be disappointed. They're closer to Warhammer 40K Orks and a band of psychotic soccer hooligans with a few geniuses leading them. Vykos maintains her dignity throughout the book, though, and this is an important set up for future volumes. As bad as the Camarilla is, we understand why they need to win along with the Anarchs. The Sabbat winning would be a complete disaster for humanity.
    Last edited by CTPhipps; 06-25-2019, 07:26 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Eldagusto
    replied
    I feel since Numerology is a big part of the Tremere all the Major Factions should be offering up their own Council of Seven, even if its six or seven out of seven of them are puppets for the leader.

    Leave a comment:


  • CTPhipps
    replied
    Originally posted by Draconis View Post
    Some of the Council of Seven may have survived; the devs are intentionally "not showing the bodies on-screen" for that. (Though the Council itself is gone.)
    I'm honestly cool if they are all gone.

    But mind you, I am furious that they killed Jan and Lucita.

    :hypocrisy nod:

    Leave a comment:


  • Draconis
    replied
    Some of the Council of Seven may have survived; the devs are intentionally "not showing the bodies on-screen" for that. (Though the Council itself is gone.)

    Leave a comment:


  • Herr Meister
    replied
    Originally posted by davidiot View Post
    it's in the Brujah Triology.
    They fight on a ship, 2 to 1. In the end they succeed in staking him and throwing him over board.
    Thank you sir!

    Leave a comment:


  • Eldagusto
    replied
    Speaking of Novels, Gehenna Final Nights, how much of what happened there inspired the "official" metaplot progression. Like the big one I see is they liked the idea of Vienna chantry being smashed. And Theo goes Rogue Camarilla for the Neonates.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X