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Toreador Antitribu scarifications

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  • Toreador Antitribu scarifications

    Hello!

    I am to larp a Toreador Antitribu on this larp in August. It's an Anarch larp that i attended last year as well, i was however under cover at that point. This year and the past year she is open about her sabbat-ness. She will accompany a Lasombra Bishop and his Tzimisce Templar.

    Reading up on the antitribu, it seems like they use scarifications, tattoos and general body mods to relay a message of the day. This fits the character perfectly and me since i am this SFX makeup junkie.

    Though i do feel like i don't know quite how to design it. It's supposed to be a kind of symbol-like language they have developed as a clan. Anyone have any ideas? What kind of scarifcations might look good, fit a toreador antitribu or just my character? (Description follows)

    Character. (Optional)
    This character is the worst kind of "feminist". Men should die out, women are superior, TERF, wants to create her own branch of the sabbat just for women. Her utmost concept of art is to make women slay their husbands/boyfriends. The SCUM manifesto is her bible. She will have black hair down to the lower back, all greasy and lank. I will also be wearing latex that i design myself.

    Thank you!

    Tl;DR: I want to design scarifications as a means of communications for a larp. This is something apparently toreador antitribu does. Any ideas?

  • #2
    as far as I know, there are no illustrations for that in the game material (and illustrators are usually unfaithful to the written descriptions)

    for scarification, I recommend you look up african scarification,
    they have the best scarification designs in my opinion


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    • #3
      I figured there are no official illustrations. I'm just fishing for your creative minds!

      I'll have a look! Should've really thought of that sooner

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      • #4
        The Maori also do interesting things with combining tattoos and scarification. Though I am not sure how well that would work with vampiric healing.

        Another way to approach this is the concept of subdermal implants, you just have a collection of symbols and letters made of what ever material you like that the vampire puts under her skin and easily heals the incisions without displacing the implants. This allows for easy adjustments in message at any given time and is easily replicated for the larp by making strips of flesh color latex or what ever that have the symbols inside it, then just use adhesive to attach it to your body.

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        • #5
          there's a merit to prevent healing (why it's a merit, I don't know)

          still, scarification is made trivial with celerity auspex and vici (which is more available in larp rules),
          but it doesn't have much of an advantage over tattoos other than not requiring ink


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          • #6
            They can also stay open if you decide not to heal them.

            Well, it's a ritual thing and symbolic. A cultural rather than convenient. A secret language only between clan-members. They also enjoy the cutting into their own flesh, carving art. They will vanish over night, of course, but that is just a perk really. Then you can do it all over again!
            I also prefer scarifications for my character because it will look cooler!

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            • #7
              I suggest starting with the exact message you want to send, then figuring out how to communicate it. Ideally, the message would include information about your character or others that other players don't have, but by decoding the scarifications would have a chance to learn.

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              • #8
                If you want something that looks exotic, but isn't hard to read once you know it, I'd adapt Evans syllabics. Outside of Canada and Alaska very few people know them, they look geometric in a way that's easy to work into scar designs, and it's not hard to adapt them to the phonology of English (or your language-of-choice).

                Alternately, an exotic-looking script that's already designed for English is Elian, which has a lot of calligraphic possibilities but is less geometric (so more for writing on the skin/tattooing than scars).

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Nosimplehiway View Post
                  I suggest starting with the exact message you want to send, then figuring out how to communicate it. Ideally, the message would include information about your character or others that other players don't have, but by decoding the scarifications would have a chance to learn.
                  Originally posted by Draconis View Post
                  If you want something that looks exotic, but isn't hard to read once you know it, I'd adapt Evans syllabics. Outside of Canada and Alaska very few people know them, they look geometric in a way that's easy to work into scar designs, and it's not hard to adapt them to the phonology of English (or your language-of-choice).

                  Alternately, an exotic-looking script that's already designed for English is Elian, which has a lot of calligraphic possibilities but is less geometric (so more for writing on the skin/tattooing than scars).
                  I will be the only toreador Antitribu there, so what the message says is not as important, since nobody will decode it! I'm thinking a bit more symbolism and cool designs. I do love the look of the Maori and african scarifications!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Okay, well, then going for pure abstract design should work fine, rather than being content driven.

                    I used to be a tattoo artist, and there is a trick I used to create tribal designs quickly, which still fit the client's body well. It won't yield world-famous high art, but it is a nice shortcut.

                    (Note: Primitive a piece of software as it is, MSPaint, or the equivalent, is super-useful for this. You could do all this by hand, with tracing paper and a decent light table, but why make life harder?)
                    1. Look at the site on the body where the image is going. Choose a shape or curve which defines that area, and makes it distinctive from the same spot on other people. Maybe it's the angle the bicep attaches above the elbow. Maybe it's the shape of the dimples on the lower back. Maybe the squarish bump at the wrist bone. Whatever it is, pick your inspiration.
                    2. Now, draw that feature as a tribal blob with a maximum of two lines, so that those two lines form a closed shape. Obviously, one or both lines might be curved, but try to keep the image as simple as possible at this point. Think in the direction of a silhouette. What you're trying to do is capture the visual essence of the feature, not a literal representation of it. Keep it simple!
                    3. To start working toward your final effect, adjust the weight and proportions of the image. If you want a lighter, filigree effect, make it a bit thinner. If you want a chunkier look, thicken it up. Be careful not to lose the original shape you're using for inspiration, though.
                    4. Size the image to cover about a ninth of the area you're working in. Picture a tic-tac-toe board. Size the image to fill one square.
                    5. For traditional tribal tattoos, fill the shape in black.
                    6. Make multiple copies of the image at multiple sizes. I like to go larger or smaller by about a third at a time, until I have a dozen or so options. Make a version of each of these shapes facing different directions. Mirror image, upside down, a quarter turn, etc. You should end up with 50 or so shapes, all identical, but with different sizes and directionality.
                    7. Choose a through line for the location. By this, I mean a line that shows the path your eye naturally travels when glancing at the body part. Upper arms tend to be sort of a comma shape. Lower backs tend to be a double curve, like the top of a cartoon heart. Calves tend toward a question mark. If you have used makeup to contour cheekbones, it's like finding the cheekbones on a heavy-set person. They're there, you just need to really look. Sketch the through line you see on this particular person.
                    8. Arrange some of the shapes along and spreading out from that through line, as if you were decorating a strand of Christmas garland.You can create a dense image, with many copies of the shape, or a loose one, with only a few. Denser will usually look more masculine and aggressive, if that matters. Making the image symmetrical, or at least well-balanced, will make it look more feminine. Arranging the shapes at a right angle to one another will make this seem more organized and put-together. Breaking out of the grid will make it more hectic and chaotic.
                    9. Keep gravity in mind, and really try to "hang" the shapes. It sounds like double-talk now, but once you get in there, it will make sense. Shapes that jut upward or outward with no clear support will make the piece seem cluttered or filled with anxiety.
                    10. When arranging the shapes, be careful not to introduce a whole new shape by combining two or more of the original shape. That will draw too much visual attention.
                    11. Stopping at the right time is the hardest part. Stop when it looks good.
                    12. Okay. You have your design. Check your work. Flip the image vertically; does it look good? Flip it mirror-image. does it look good? Walk away for a few minutes to clear your head, and check it again. Does your eye move comfortably through the piece? Is there any part that forces your eye to pause, like a raised stitch in a tapestry?
                    13. If it does not look good in any of these directions, it needs work. Don't start from the beginning, though. Go back to step 8. Maybe, 7 at the very worst.
                    14. Take your design and resize it to completely fill the body part, with a tiny bit of overhang. Blank space around a piece looks bad.
                    15. Apply the design to the skin, using whatever medium you're using. I now nothing about fx makeup, so I'll leave that part to the cosplayers. This is the point where I would make a stencil, and make sure the client likes the design and placement before the blood and screaming starts.

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