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The Gates of Damascus - A Supplement for Vampire: the Dark Ages

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  • The Gates of Damascus - A Supplement for Vampire: the Dark Ages



    Thunder in the East: Since the time of the Second City, the Children of Haqim have been the judges of the Children of Caine. Yet times are changing and, in recent years, many of the Banu Haqim who arrive in the Levant are harsh and uncompromising, wanting to impose their own ideas of order upon the Cainites of the land. Regardless of the reasons for the rise of this new breed amongst the clan, their appearance is seen by many Syrian Cainites as an ominous sign. There are some who claim to have heard the thunder in the east, warning of an approaching storm.

    Syria by Night: The Gates of Damascus is a location sourcebook for Vampire: the Dark Ages, from the creative team behind England Will Burn. The book contains general information on the region of Syria, as well as chapters containing detailed information on two key domains, the cities of Raqqa and Amman. The book provides information on the history, geography, and Cainite populations of these places, as well as material on other key places of interest, including Palmyra, Jericho, and Deir ez-Zor.

    The Games of Damascus is available now from the Storyteller's Vault.



    Learn more about the hidden history of the British Isles in England Will Burn.
    Find out about the struggle to control medieval Syria in The Gates of Damascus.

  • #2
    Very Nice, England will Burn is awesome. Honestly one of the best Dark Ages setting books I've read.

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    • #3
      I agree. I liked a lot England will Burn. And "The Gates of Damascus" promises to follow the same way.

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      • #4
        Niiiiiice. Me need


        Freelance Writer and Storyteller's Vault contributor. Find my work here: http://www.storytellersvault.com/ind...liate_id=17903

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        • #5
          I bought it as soon as I saw it. Way too much in it for a detailed reaction yet, but it looks very impressive.

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          • #6
            Damascus by Night, from The Veil of Night, is one of my favorite settings for Vampire Dark Ages. So I am expectant.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Justycar View Post
              Damascus by Night, from The Veil of Night, is one of my favorite settings for Vampire Dark Ages. So I am expectant.

              One of the most compelling features of 'Damascus by Night' is that it has a strong central concept, that of a city wholly infiltrated by the Baali, and then really works with that as a theme. Taking this approach in relation to a location sets up the Storyteller for a compelling chronicle.


              Learn more about the hidden history of the British Isles in England Will Burn.
              Find out about the struggle to control medieval Syria in The Gates of Damascus.

              Comment


              • #8
                The Gates of Damascus is very much a labour of love. Back in the second half of 2016 / first half of 2017 I had to monitor what was going on in relation to the Syrian civil war in relation to work. It's a fascinating place, and I ended up picking up a ridiculous amount of knowledge in relation to what the country is like. Realistically, I'm not sure how it is going to sell, so we have ended up with a 100-page supplement, covering a few moderate size domains, and assorted background information. If the response is good, I will be adding additional chapters. There are a few hints about the locations which I find interesting in the existing text of the book...

                On that note, the next project is adding further material to England Will Burn; the price will go up when I add more chapters, so it may be a good time to buy.


                Learn more about the hidden history of the British Isles in England Will Burn.
                Find out about the struggle to control medieval Syria in The Gates of Damascus.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I have not read the book yet, but I appreciate the work and the research behind, so congratulations James_Willoughby. I wish you take profit for it.

                  As I said before, The Veil of Night is one of the most compelling books of Dark Ages Vampire that I have read, if not the best. It has the perfect balance between something new (the Ashirra and the focus in Middle East), but without the need to break or rewrite the lore (as the Kindred of the East). And also, is not insular or irrelevant for a more classical chronicle centered in Europe, the Ashirra are a common sight in al Andalus or Constantinopla.

                  I storytelled some years ago a 15 sessions chronicle based on Damascus and all the players enjoyed the confluence of plots in the city: the Baali conspiracy, the bhasirite cult of the Gehenna, the Banu Haqim investigation of estrange murders, etc. One of the most iconic characters that I have enjoyed playing as storyteller is Annazir, the soft and calm, scheming and smart courtesan, far away from the common idea of a infernalist.

                  So, soon or later, I will buy The gates the Damascus gladly.

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                  • #10
                    And, for those who are interested, but have not yet purchased, The Gates of Damascus is currently discounted in the Storytellers Vault Halloween sale. For the next twelve days there will be a 25% discount on this exploration of medieval Syria.


                    Learn more about the hidden history of the British Isles in England Will Burn.
                    Find out about the struggle to control medieval Syria in The Gates of Damascus.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Justycar View Post
                      I have not read the book yet, but I appreciate the work and the research behind, so congratulations James_Willoughby. I wish you take profit for it.

                      As I said before, The Veil of Night is one of the most compelling books of Dark Ages Vampire that I have read, if not the best. It has the perfect balance between something new (the Ashirra and the focus in Middle East), but without the need to break or rewrite the lore (as the Kindred of the East). And also, is not insular or irrelevant for a more classical chronicle centered in Europe, the Ashirra are a common sight in al Andalus or Constantinopla.

                      I storytelled some years ago a 15 sessions chronicle based on Damascus and all the players enjoyed the confluence of plots in the city: the Baali conspiracy, the bhasirite cult of the Gehenna, the Banu Haqim investigation of estrange murders, etc. One of the most iconic characters that I have enjoyed playing as storyteller is Annazir, the soft and calm, scheming and smart courtesan, far away from the common idea of a infernalist.

                      So, soon or later, I will buy The gates the Damascus gladly.

                      Not related to anything in particular, but decided to do a quick check on the name Annazir - what initially led me to an-Nāṣirī "nazarene", funnily enough - but a little more time on haphazard internet searching got me "an-naZir; ‘one who sees, who contemplates; inspector, intendant, vigilant, vineyard guard; administrator" in arabic, from a portuguese linguistics study on the etymology of place names.

                      Coming from arabic, i'd guess it's a name the ancient picked for himself (ergo, possibly reflecting on how he views himself &/or role) in contrast with a birth name (that would make loads of sense for a molochite to want to hide anyway).

                      Also noticed some hiccups with his supposed age. His story tells us "He has resided there since he was a young infernal recruit during its years as a Greek outpost over 2000 years ago" - well, except over 2000 years before 1198 would imply sometime around 800 BCE, what's about half a millenium before any major greek presence in the city, that would be from the coming of Alexander the Great onwards (though it could fit for a 20th-21st century chronicler).

                      And then his sheet gives us "Embraced: 12th century BCE", to make things even better.

                      Thought it would be interesting to share the trivia & nitpicking.
                      Last edited by Baaldam; 10-22-2020, 11:37 AM.

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