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What if Ten Thousand Demons(Immortals) is a global phonemenon?

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  • #16
    I mean to say that due to cultural reasons in certain places a story of the supernatural is met with 'cool story, let's leave it alone' whilst a story in other places is met with either 'what a load of bullshit' or 'let us hunt this afront to all good people of god'. Asia and Africa generally lean to be the former, Europe and many of it's settlers closer to the latter, and there's a bunch of places I'm not really sure about. Kue-Jin were written on the grounds that their local culture was more accepting of the supernatural than the west's -masquerade or die- attitude.


    Freedom is the freedom to say that two plus two make four. If that is granted, all else follows.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by MyWifeIsScary View Post
      Kue-Jin were written on the grounds that their local culture was more accepting of the supernatural than the west's -masquerade or die- attitude.
      To be honest I’m curious why there are always someone think East of WoD is more accepting of supernatural than West. Does any source mention it? AFAIK eastern supernaturals also have their masquerade thing. KJ is Scarlett Screen, for example

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      • #18
        I'm pretty sure it was mentioned in the book. Ebony kingdom also mentions that africa has more acceptance too.

        Obviously, they don't brazenly break the masquerade as if they didn't have an equivalent whatsoever, it's just that they can get away with more.


        Freedom is the freedom to say that two plus two make four. If that is granted, all else follows.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Rock113 View Post
          To be honest I’m curious why there are always someone think East of WoD is more accepting of supernatural than West. Does any source mention it? AFAIK eastern supernaturals also have their masquerade thing. KJ is Scarlett Screen, for example
          It's a balancing act of cultures. Practically every culture around the world essentially starts off as superstitious and has a laundry list of taboos and behaviors designed at the very least to placate the supernatural or more often how to mange it. The tricky part comes from how the culture progressed from those beginnings and interacts with the modern age.

          In modern day Africa there are places that the populace have access to smart phones and the internet, yet they still believe in Witch Doctors to the point that there are laws on the books for prosecuting illegal magic users. Obviously our first reaction is to talk about some of our own weird laws that no one has updated in over a century but these anti-magic laws are being used actively in modern court cases. In fact the notion of what a Witch Doctors tools should look like has been updated to include a "spell gun" of sorts. Rather than using a wand or decorated staff, the witch doctors in certain areas use a pistol shaped item that is crafted to help them shoot spells at their targets. So not only can the supernatural exist in modern times, it can coexist side by side with modern laws and police enforcement.

          Getting back to asian cultures being more accepting of the supernatural it is just a question of how the culture integrates the modern world and the ancient world. Consider how many anime show modern day students going to a shrine to pay money to the deity to gain luck or carry charms for economic or academic success. The asian masquerade is less about hiding the supernatural from the culture and more about keeping the supernatural entities and events within the expectations of that culture. Thus if the culture expects the ancestor spirits to meddle with the lives of the currently living family members, then when a threat to the family is randomly destroyed by someone who looks a lot like a great great grand parent, everyone just shrugs and breathes a sigh of relief and goes to the family shrine to add extra offerings.

          For a western equivalent, trying watching an old Disney movie called "Darby O'Gill and the Little People". It shows how even "relatively modern" western culture can still have some superstitions and cultural knowledge of the supernatural. The key feature is that the supernatural isn't something that shouldn't exist, it just coexists with the rest of reality.

          Also it is worth noting that the cultural differences between the east and west about personal behavior and familial duty create a major difference in how the supernatural monsters act. In the west a vampire is a spiritual aberration which should be destroyed because it is a predator in the community. In the east the vampire is something that is just as often a guardian spirit of a family and thus respected and given offerings to. This variety of behavior means that unlike the wests "supernatural = evil" the east sees supernatural entities more like how we see people, some are good, some are bad, and some are indifferent, but all of them are part of life.

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          • #20
            It's certainly cultural, and I see it as a difference in tolerance. I mean compare the Shih to the Society of Leopold. Hell isn't the middle east generally 'better' in their engagement with the supernatural than the west (meaning the US and much of europe?) It always struck me as the west being more fundamentally ignorant and more intolerant (which likely reflects the success of factions like the Technocracy, vampires, etc. suppressing those supernatural elements and shaping public opinion.)

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