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  • Story Telling Help

    Hi,

    Me again.

    Sorry, i know i post this alot, but i am finding it very tricky to write VTM chronicles and understand the general rules of table top RPG's. I read this in one of the books:

    "Player characters may want to explore the restaurant. At this point, they probably will not be able to, but you need to have information in advance in case it’s asked."

    everything i have been told about the world of Table Top RPG's goes against the above example completely. if i say to a player "you cant go in there" their first response is "who says i cant? its my world, i'm going in and eating everyone in there, im a hungry monster" (this was actually said by a player when i was first spit balling ideas for scenarios they might like)

    My first idea was to have a story set in Rome, I had a story and twists all drafted, which was quickly dismantled when one of my players says "first thing i am doing is eat the pope". to which i said "you cant do that, he is an important plot point" (the pope was replaced with a false doubleganger and they were suppose to find the real one captured by the Sabbat)

    am I over thinking this too much? is it best to have:

    1) plot objective
    2) list of places they can go (locations in counties and surrounding counties)
    3) a list of camerilla and anarks in each place, a short bio on them and how they fit in
    4) the main SPC's like the Prince and the Primogen Council members


    I understand that players love freedom to do what every they want. go here kill this guy, go here blow this up etc etc but at what point do you or can you cut them off saying "ok, now your acting crazy"

    personally, I am a story follower, if i am given a mission, i love seeing it through. In Table top games as a player, i dont really "push boundaries" i like following plots. I prefer linear story plots

    to quote Denzil Washington in Philadelphia, can someone please "explain this to me like i am a two year old please, there is an element here i just cant get through my thick head"

    thanks for reading

  • #2
    Yes, let them try to eat the Pope.

    If they succeed, then have the doppelganger replace someone else when they do a new election.

    However, if sounds like your Players aren't really interested in the deep and complex plot points you're going for. You should ask, "What kind of vampire game do you want to run?"

    If they want Sabbat mayhem, let them get it out of their system but let them know you've gotten a big game together and wish you'd been told ahead of time you're going to be running a bunch of cartoon lunacy.


    Author of Cthulhu Armageddon, I was a Teenage Weredeer, Straight Outta Fangton, Lucifer's Star, and the Supervillainy Saga.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Toa_Kiril View Post
      I understand that players love freedom to do what every they want. go here kill this guy, go here blow this up etc etc but at what point do you or can you cut them off saying "ok, now your acting crazy"
      Don't cut them off. Just provide logical consequences to their actions.

      If PCs are killing people and blowing things up left and right, chances are they're going to start endangering the Masquerade and/or pissing off other vampires. Depending on the scope of the Masquerade breach, the prince might let them off with partial blood bonds or periods of service, or just decide to just execute them if they've been a big enough pain in the ass. Don't be afraid to kill PCs. Give them dice rolls and/or in-character warnings to avoid that fate, but if they fail the rolls and ignore the warnings, so be it.

      Bottom line, you have to provide consequences to PCs' actions if players are going to take your game world seriously. If there are never consequences, the players will have every reason to believe they can do what they want. They will keep acting crazier until you give them a reason not to.

      Whenever possible, try to make the PCs' actions fuel new storylines. Maybe the guy they killed has a wife who becomes a vampire hunter and attacks the PCs in their haven. Maybe if the sheriff comes down on them for their behavior, some Anarchs try to recruit them. Maybe their actions cause the sheriff to lose his job, if he fails to curtail them, and makes the prince appoint a new sheriff. Maybe some opportunistic vampires try to get the PCs to indulge in more hijinks as cover for their own activities. This will convey to your players that their PCs' actions have impact on the game world, and that it is a larger place than just their characters.

      2) list of places they can go (locations in counties and surrounding counties)
      I wouldn't bother with a list. Let the players go where they want. If they go to a location you don't have prepared material for, make up details on the fly. Improvisation is a necessary skill to GMing.

      Let them know where the chronicle is taking place in general terms, though. If you've told your players, "This chronicle is set in Rome," it's irresponsible of the player to say "I jump on a plane to Tokyo" without giving the GM a reason why this will enhance rather than detract from the chronicle's intended focus.

      My first idea was to have a story set in Rome, I had a story and twists all drafted, which was quickly dismantled when one of my players says "first thing i am doing is eat the pope". to which i said "you cant do that, he is an important plot point" (the pope was replaced with a false doubleganger and they were suppose to find the real one captured by the Sabbat)
      My answer to that would be, "Okay, tell me how you try to do that." The pope isn't an easy man to get to, even for vampires. The player should expect lots of planning, dice rolling, and combat scenes, as well as the possibility they might fail and lose their PC. But if they can pull it off, let them enjoy the fruits of their victory. Killing the pope should lead to a ton of new story developments.

      It's ok for you to have to scrap prepared plot points. This will inevitably happen if the players are to have freedom of agency in your setting.

      Originally posted by CTPhipps View Post
      However, if sounds like your Players aren't really interested in the deep and complex plot points you're going for. You should ask, "What kind of vampire game do you want to run?"
      Also, this. Talk with your players. Tell them what kind of game you want to run and ask them if that's the kind of game they want to play.


      Blood and Bourbon, my New Orleans-based Vampire chronicle.

      Comment


      • #4
        False Epiphany so, please humour me a moment, as the core book didn't help with my issues, youtube had different opinions and mostly v20 guides, and I am a genuine novice. If its not at all out of line, could you please advise how to craft a chronicle for players who's experiences are mostly DnD. (they have said they are open to new systems and wont compare its mechanics to DnD). I know that these sorts of games can be crafted to the players and the DM's designs but I am looking for a simple: "follow this" instructional sort of thing. a starting point. so that when i get better at GM'ing i can alter and expand where necessary.

        thank you for reading, i hope i explained simply enough




        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Toa_Kiril View Post
          False Epiphany so, please humour me a moment, as the core book didn't help with my issues, youtube had different opinions and mostly v20 guides, and I am a genuine novice. If its not at all out of line, could you please advise how to craft a chronicle for players who's experiences are mostly DnD. (they have said they are open to new systems and wont compare its mechanics to DnD). I know that these sorts of games can be crafted to the players and the DM's designs but I am looking for a simple: "follow this" instructional sort of thing. a starting point. so that when i get better at GM'ing i can alter and expand where necessary.

          thank you for reading, i hope i explained simply enough
          If you want a really clear rubric to follow, I'd just run a published adventure for your group. Some of the better ones (IMO) are Ashes to Ashes, Dust to Dust, some of the adventures in Succubus Club (a couple of them aren't so good), and the adventure in Chicago V5. Plus Fall of London. With a little tweaking, you can adapt them to Rome or whatever setting your group is playing in.

          I'd also recommend Danse de la Morte, Reap the Whirlwind, and the various SAS mini-adventures for Vampire: The Requiem. It doesn't take too much tweaking to make them work for Masquerade. Carthians become Anarchs, Invictus -> Camarilla, Lancea et Sanctum -> Church of Caine, Circle of the Crone -> House Carna, and Ordo Dracul -> House Tremere. Clan conversions are a little more fiat-based, but also easily done.

          I might also read/watch some ongoing chronicles for inspiration and examples to follow. L.A. By Night is all kinds of great. My current chronicle also has text transcripts of its sessions.


          Blood and Bourbon, my New Orleans-based Vampire chronicle.

          Comment


          • #6
            It takes practice to learn to think on your feet and come up with how the world should react when the players decide to do something you hadn't anticipated. Some of it can be helped by thinking of contingencies, but you can't foresee everything. A lot of those consequences can come from local law enforcement, be it the police, kindred sheriff and scourge and even organized criminal groups. Fleshing out those areas, who's in charge, what vampires or other supernaturals have ghouls/agents in those organizations, etc can cover a lot of bases. Maybe the restaurant they wrecked up was a front for the mob or if you wanted to keep them out entirely a ghoul refuses to seat any vampires that aren't approved by his master. In some ways it's just something you have to keep doing to get good at, but some prep work can help and knowing who controls what parts of the city goes a long way. Who has the chief of the police and (mortal) sheriff in their pocket, who has the county coroner ghouled? What gangs are in the area and who controls them? Who's the kindred sheriff and scourge and what pies do they have their fingers in? What industries/businesses do other local kindred have under their thumbs and would consider it a trespass on their domain if someone interfered?

            In the case of going after the Pope, I'd let them go for it but make them get past the Swiss Guard. You can expect them to be secret service level trained and maybe one or more of them is packing true faith even if the Pope doesn't have it. Maybe one of them is a Celestial Chorister mage if you really want to give them a big leg up and make the difficulty appropriately hard. Plus, if it's modern he has the Popemobile to flee in. Then if they do mange to actually pull it off, as CTPhipps pointed out you can use a double, plus they have to deal with being hunted by the Swiss Guard, local mortal authorities, the mob and even the local Kindred might declare a blood hunt on them for drawing that much attention. If you don't want to get into the mage stuff you can give the Chorister some discipline equivalents like lure of flames, auspex, etc.

            This doesn't directly apply to killing the Pope, but one way to reign in the murder hoboing is to really impress the right of destruction. Unless they're Sabbat, only the Prince or Baron can decide if a vampire can be destroyed. This means killing another vampire is a capital offense and you'll be blood hunted if you kill one since only the Prince can decide who lives and who dies. This provides a bit of a layer of protection to keep them from killing kindred NPCs. it only takes a vampire with auspex of 3 to investigate a murder scene and see who committed the murder. In the case of killing the Pope, it could be considered a Masquerade violation, even if they didn't do anything obviously supernatural just since if anyone were to connect the dots it could spell bad things. Plus some vampires do buy into the whole Catholic thing. Imagine how many Giovanni would be pissed and want to find the Pope's killer and interrogate ghosts the players didn't even know were watching to find the culprit.

            Here's an example from a game I'm running now, a player decided to chuck a grenade under a van some hunters were getting out of. In the fight with the hunters there was automatic weapon fire in addition to the explosion. Needless to say there was an extreme police response with cars and a chopper covering the neighborhood, so they had to spend a lot of the next session just trying to escape the police response from their actions. As a further consequence (as well as due to the gang wars they've been fueling), most of the mayors in the county have promised increased night patrols of police and choppers ready to fly at all times. So now the difficulty of not just any criminal activity but just feeding has gone up as a direct consequence of their actions. There's also the FBI beginning to investigate the situation with the local gangs. Now the Prince is going to be pissed off with these developments and the SWAT team might be deployed for smaller provocations. Let the players blow shit up if they want, just make sure the response is appropriate to like what would happen in the real world and then some since there could be supernatural backing. When one player tried to ghoul a guy in the armory of a local naval base to steal heavy ordinance, one night when he went to see the ghoul, he was met by a pair of gentlemen in black suits named Mr. Doe and Mr. Cardholder (totally stole that from the Venture Bros) who were technocracy agents and informed him the ghoul had been sent off to room 101 for reeducation. The player got really scared when he tried to dominate one and it didn't work at all. I did play it light and basically had them let the character off with a warning, since they didn't want a war with supernaturals, but told him to stay away from the bases. If you don't want to bring in stuff from mage, it could easily be another vampire has ghouls there and considers it their turf and they respond to it as a trespass of their domain. Once again, it comes back to knowing who controls what in the city, so you can slap down the players for stepping on someone else's toes.

            One great way to help new players is by having an NPC you control in the coterie. This absolutely should not be a Mary Sue character and the players should be solving the problems themselves and fighting their own battles. Don't give in to the temptation to make them a power character better than the PCs. A nerdier person who sits in the background character works well here. They can provide some advice when the players are stuck or just tell them this is a stupid idea and explain what the possible consequences for doing it could be. The nerdy aspect means they might have a decent occult or other lore skills to help explain some of the supernatural aspects of the world.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Toa_Kiril View Post
              Hi,

              Sorry, i know i post this alot, but i am finding it very tricky to write VTM chronicles and understand the general rules of table top RPG's. I read this in one of the books:

              "Player characters may want to explore the restaurant. At this point, they probably will not be able to, but you need to have information in advance in case it’s asked."

              everything i have been told about the world of Table Top RPG's goes against the above example completely. if i say to a player "you cant go in there" their first response is "who says i cant? its my world, i'm going in and eating everyone in there, im a hungry monster" (this was actually said by a player when i was first spit balling ideas for scenarios they might like)
              Out of context it does sound like a weird quote. Why wouldn't they be able to explore a restaurant? But generally you should follow the players actions logically and apply consequences to those action.
              "I want to enter the restaurant"
              "It's closed."
              "So? I break in!"
              "Roll the dice. You succeed, bypassing the security system. The restaurant is dark and empty."
              "What do I need to roll to explore it?"
              "You don't need to roll, there's nothing here."
              "But why?!"
              "As I said, it's closed."

              My first idea was to have a story set in Rome, I had a story and twists all drafted, which was quickly dismantled when one of my players says "first thing i am doing is eat the pope". to which i said "you cant do that, he is an important plot point" (the pope was replaced with a false doubleganger and they were suppose to find the real one captured by the Sabbat)
              If a player wants to try to kill any SPC, let them. Sometimes you can prepare for this in advance, like the examples above, sometimes players decide to try things at the spur of the moment. I usually take a five to ten minute break when that happens to think about my response. Last time this happened was in another game system where I thought the players were doing some recon spywork before one of the players decided to grab some explosives and try to take the base they were scouting down. I said great, check the rules for explosives while I go grab a cup of coffee and thought about what the consequences should be.
              I don't believe that you should say no to players unless they break the rules or acting disruptive for out-of-game reasons.

              is it best to have:

              1) plot objective
              2) list of places they can go (locations in counties and surrounding counties)
              3) a list of camerilla and anarks in each place, a short bio on them and how they fit in
              4) the main SPC's like the Prince and the Primogen Council members
              1) A clear plot objective can be tricky, what if the players say no or aren't interested?

              In the first story of my chronicle I wanted the characters to get to know each Primogen member so I decided that the Prince was going to invoke an oldschool tradition that requires half of the Primogen to give them a vote of confidence. So my intro scene was a fledgling defying the prince in elysium, getting staked by the scourge/sheriff, and then slowly decapitated in front of the assembly and then the prince informs them that he would like them to honor this old tradition. They don't have to do anything but that scene gave them incentive to do what I wanted.

              2) You should at least have a few important locations ready if you don't want to improvise every new place. Our group don't really care that much for correct details such as street names or such, zooming out and blurring most of it with simple terms "Jonah's haven is in Milton Hills - it's the worst neighbourhood in the bad part of town, a place where the cops response time is slightly slower than the postal service"

              3&4) I made exactly 12 SPC before starting session zero for my chronicle. Prince, Seneschal, Herald, couple of harpies, Sheriff, Scourge, Primogen and one Anarch leader. The rest I filled in as we moved along. The players detailed their sires and after that I started thinking about what kind of city I wanted. And when I say made, I really mean finding art, writing two or maybe three sentences each and randomising some motivations before putting them on a relationship map.
              That way I know what they want, what they think of each other and from that I'm pretty set to improvise interactions if the players meet them.
              At the moment I have a names, clans and simple stats for a third of the kindred population. The rest I leave open until I need a new ancillae or neonate for something specific.

              The golden rule of preparation is do as much as you need and if you think that it is fun, keep working on the game prep.

              I understand that players love freedom to do what every they want. go here kill this guy, go here blow this up etc etc but at what point do you or can you cut them off saying "ok, now your acting crazy"

              personally, I am a story follower, if i am given a mission, i love seeing it through. In Table top games as a player, i dont really "push boundaries" i like following plots. I prefer linear story plots

              to quote Denzil Washington in Philadelphia, can someone please "explain this to me like i am a two year old please, there is an element here i just cant get through my thick head"
              I really think that you should consider getting the players onboard with the expectations of the game before planning anything. So for my chronicle, I wanted vampire politics with a dash of personal horror. Nothing epic, but plenty of weird and creepy things in-between navigating the shark tank of kindred society.

              If my players had said "Hey, I want to wield a katana and wear a trenchcoat" then we would have to discuss if our clashing visions can be reconciled. If they want to play Underworld and I want to run An Interview with the Vampire, the whole premise is doomed to fail.

              So for my game, I have a plot, but that plot will go on with or without the players involvement. If they engage with it, they'll change what happens in ways I can't imagine yet because I don't know when and where they'll intersect. Instead of having a main quest with optional side quests, I have plot hooks all over the place and the story follows the players but things will keep going in the background. And the players know this, that their actions or inactions have consequences, and that is where we find our drama.

              So for me, all of my vampire stories begin with a question. So for my first story, the question is: Will they succeed in getting accepted by the Prince?

              There isn't a linear rail to follow, they are free to do and try whatever they want but after the week is up, either they succeed (on to the next story) or fail (ending in a blood hunt/execution or the story of how they try to find a new city, leaving everything they know and have behind).

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by LazyGM View Post

                Out of context it does sound like a weird quote. Why wouldn't they be able to explore a restaurant? But generally you should follow the players actions logically and apply consequences to those action.
                "I want to enter the restaurant"
                "It's closed."
                "So? I break in!"
                "Roll the dice. You succeed, bypassing the security system. The restaurant is dark and empty."
                "What do I need to roll to explore it?"
                "You don't need to roll, there's nothing here."
                "But why?!"
                "As I said, it's closed."
                As a minor addendum to this post's otherwise great advice, I'll usually allow a roll to explore (even if there's nothing there) and say "You see nothing there," as opposed to out and out stating "There's nothing there." Darths & Droids says in a great comic,

                This response can be cultivated. Never say, "There are no traps in the room," when you can say, "You don't detect any traps." Don't say, "There are no orcs around." Say, "There are no orcs visible within the range of the feeble flickering of your torches." And especially don't say, "It's perfectly safe to rest and regain your strength in the realm of the friendly elves. They tend to your wounds and give you delicious nuts and berries, and sweet honeyed wine to drink." Say instead, "The elves appear to be friendly, offering what they claim are healing balms and lotions. You sniff the golden liquid in a proffered cup, and think you can recognise a faint odour of almonds..."

                Sometimes there really is nothing sinister or mysterious going on, but whenever possible, I try to leave players suspicious and never feeling completely safe. The WoD thrives off paranoia and fear of the unknown, and one of the ways to cultivate that is by describing things according to the PC's subjective perceptions ("You see nothing moving in the shadows") ("Your sire claims to only have your best interests at heart") rather than objective realities.
                Last edited by False Epiphany; 10-11-2020, 12:23 AM.


                Blood and Bourbon, my New Orleans-based Vampire chronicle.

                Comment


                • #9
                  First: I would never tell your players they can’t do something because of plot reasons. It will ruin any sense of agency they might have. Few players enjoy on-rails experiences. From an ST perspective, telling a completely linear story is hard. Players can, and will, do things you do not expect (and not even in an attempt to derail things, either). You have to be able to adapt on-the-fly to the unexpected, and a linear story makes this very difficult.

                  Second: “first thing i am doing is eat the pope” is a game-stopper. A player who says that is one or more of the following: too immature to play Vampire, too impatient to play the type of mystery story you’re trying to run, not on the same page as you regarding the chronicle, completely ignorant about the setting, and/or completely ignorant about their own character.

                  Let’s think about it. Why does the player want to eat the Pope? Are there anything resembling in-character justifications, or do they just want to do something absurd? Say they actually have justifications. They’re an infernalist, or something. Well, have they thought through just what that would entail? All the layers of security they would have to overcome just in order to reach the Pope? The very strong likelihood that the Vatican probably has a great deal of True Faith, which is anathema to the vampire? The fact the Pope, himself, probably has True Faith?

                  Take it back a step. Who is the character’s sire? Why did they embrace this Pope-eating-wannabe? Vampires rarely sire for the fun of it. In most cities, permission is needed in order to do so, and not many are going to waste the opportunity embracing a total lunatic who will go off and try to eat the Pope first chance they get. This is a person who has lived with the player character for years, teaching them everything they know about what it means and what it requires to be a successful vampire. They will have taught the need for circumspection and the importance of the Masquerade. They will have taught about hunters, and True Faith, and all that other stuff. Even if the character WANTS to eat the Pope, they should know perfectly well that doing so is both next to impossible and a horrible, horrible idea.

                  That’s why I say they aren’t mature, and why they don’t know the setting, and why they probably don’t even know their character.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    tiltowait he wanted to as it was "set in rome". he gave a similar response to "its set in london", i prefixed with: "The Tremere are being blamed for strange symbols appearing over the city". he said "im eating the queen". I even said "you cant start off the game like that" he reponded with "i control the world, im heading to the place"

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      hey guys,

                      thanks to everyone who posted CTPhipps False Epiphany LazyGM DrHappyAngry really good advice, I am constantly re reading these, to get them in my head.

                      What if your players like exploration? as it if were a Bethesda RPG (like if they were in a Motel and they wanted to loot it from top to bottom). What should i do in preparation for that? make a list of place names? POI's in those towns? one of my friends says "What if we are in a different postcode?" "what if we are in Bournemouth and our task is in London?" I said "you have choices: Celerity because its faster than driving or Uber if you have no driving skill and your character is lazy"

                      If I make a list of key places like: Police Station, Motel, Burger King's etc. Should I include some loot able things (what would I try to loot). I know some POI's might not have any relevance to the plot and can be used in the plot:

                      "the prince ordered us to go to the police station to negotiate a kindreds release"

                      Player A: "Oh I see a gun store, lets check it out" (should i not have a list of places and let the players tell me what they see if i tell them they are in a town and not a city and then giving a description of said town)

                      maybe the rest of the session is set around the gun store. are the players able to buy guns? maybe due to a player with a 16 y/o vampire character, they are under age and the group is refused service because she is handling Combat Shotguns and the weight is not an issue for her. Maybe the players make a distraction outside the store to get the owner outside and the 16 y/o lockpicks the back door and steals stuff (or grabs the Combat Shotgun and says she couldn't get in ). Maybe the 16 y/o uses Dominate for the Irony in the situation "get out of my store" "you get out of your store, oh leave the keys"

                      I know in DnD you can have 3 or 4 game sessions where your in a cave because your character is lousy with directions and mages are sending waves of water to knock you over and disorientate you.(RPing that was fun XD low IQ Tiny Bugbear XD) Im talking 4 foot high tiny XD. Is it possible to spend multiple session on something seemingly mundane if your players will it? Like searching every room in a motel encase there is something valuable in the back room of a room on the 5th floor? or in that instance should I do a general "after searching every room you saw 3 deceased hookers, a drug deal gone wrong or right and found £1000 total, a mixed tape for a band called N-Sync and a Glock with the inscription: Sasha"

                      they go to the police station after the gun store and a 16 y/o walks in with a Combat Shotgun. how do the police react? lets find out

                      I know plot is important to the games. Is it possible to start off without one and THEN a plot thread gets introduced, you know sort of:

                      "the coterie are chilling in a nightclub when a messenger from the prince arrives" do they help him? yes or no? different things happen. If not does the Sheriff come by and crack some skulls? is there a nightclub to go back to? Is a touchstone held as a "guest" because of the resistance (literally making these things up as I am typing this out)

                      Can the players spend the first few session without a plot. just explore the city, relax into the world, feel there characters out, maybe test powers or how high they can jump. maybe there is no plot at the start, they stir up some s**t, now they are wanted criminals. I suppose the appropriate question here is: Can the Players stumble into there own plot that i as GM would flesh out? they bump into an old lady and don't apologies, a few hours later 6 thugs all built like The Terminator catch up with them, that old lady was the grandmother of a Don style human NPC, and even these guys are humans, they can take and dish out a beating.

                      perchance did i answer my own questions with how this message went off on tangents?

                      thank you for reading

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Just ask ahead of time what the players want from their vampire game and then say what you'd like to do. Open communication.


                        Author of Cthulhu Armageddon, I was a Teenage Weredeer, Straight Outta Fangton, Lucifer's Star, and the Supervillainy Saga.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          You've already got a ton of good advice but I would honestly set it either in your hometown or a nearby town that you all know well, that removes like 70% of the world building a new ST needs to do straight up.

                          Anyone who attempts to eat a public figure is getting sanctioned: Cam won't stand for it, Anarchs don't need the attention and even Sabbat realise that causing that big a scene is going to end badly for everyone.

                          The pope ones funny for a whole bunch of reasons....I'd back the Swiss Guard against a fledgling vampire any day of the week and the sheer number of folks with True Faith ( probs not the Cardinals, Bishops etc. but there are a LOT of faithful in Rome) in that area is gonna make life super interesting for a vampire even moving through the area,

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            The gun store literally happened in the game I'm running now and I just rolled with it. It's easier for them, though, since my game is retro '91 so pre Brady Bill and they took the long approach and ghouled the gunsmith. In modern nights they shouldn't be able to get a lot of guns without passing a background check. Robbing the store or using presence/dominate to get them to give them guns is a completely viable strategy, but keep in mind most of gun stores have security cameras and closely track inventory and sales these days, as well as the possibility for a silent alarm if they're robbed. Plus most of staff and customers in a gun store are armed. So odds are the person that was dominated into giving them guns loses their job and local law enforcement follows up trying to track them down. The SWAT team or FBI busting in their haven during the day is not a good scene. This once again comes back to knowing law enforcement in the area and who controls them. Some of it is just knowing how to roll with things, which you'll get better at with practice.

                            The game I'm running now is very exploratory and they've even stopped in towns I hadn't done any prep for. This means I'm pulling up google maps on the fly to get a quick look at the town and just riffing off of what's there and what they're looking for. It's a nomadic game, so it's to be expected. Keeping things in a more specific area can help cut down on that until you've gotten a bit of practice with improvisation. It would help to take a look at some of the surrounding area and get a bit of a handle on it. You can also use werewolves to keep them from getting too far outside the city. You don't even have to actually have a full appearance from them, just hint that they're around with howls in the forest. You could use other threats like ghosts or an autarkis vampire who takes any trespass on his domain as a reason to kill them or some other danger outside of the area you want to deal with. Give the players some warning of this, though. Don't just have one drive out of town and have them get murdered.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Toa_Kiril View Post
                              tiltowait he wanted to as it was "set in rome". he gave a similar response to "its set in london", i prefixed with: "The Tremere are being blamed for strange symbols appearing over the city". he said "im eating the queen". I even said "you cant start off the game like that" he reponded with "i control the world, im heading to the place"
                              Yeah. Like so many other posters have said, you should directly talk with your players about what kind of game everyone wants.

                              Most vampires don't want to kill famous public figures. Even the Sabbat isn't that crazy. My hunch would be your player hasn't justified "why I want to kill the queen" as part of his PC's character concept, and simply wants to do crazy things because that strikes him as fun.

                              If you want to run a serious, story-focused game, this player is a bad fit for your table. If this player wants to play in a game that revolves around crazy hijinks, you are a bad fit for him as a GM. Hence why you'll benefit from talking and getting on the same page about what kind of game this is.

                              Also, the attitude he's showing is pretty crappy. I wouldn't be thrilled at a GM who told me what I could and couldn't do in their world, but ignoring that and saying "I do it anyway" shows a total lack of respect for the GM's role.


                              Blood and Bourbon, my New Orleans-based Vampire chronicle.

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