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  • Originally posted by Fat Larry View Post
    Have you covered Pentex and any possible dealings with professional sports, yet?
    Not yet, but I plan to. I up grew watching stuff like HBO's 1st & Ten and Major League, so while I've never been a sports fan, per say, I do have an enjoyment of some of the behind the scenes drama and weirdness. One book in particular I'll plug is Mike Lupica's 2000 novel Bump and Run, about a fictional NFL team (the NY Hawks). The single most PENTEXy bit, in terms of "yeah,they would totally do that", is a rival team, the LA Bangers, who were named and marketed entirely to appeal to streetgang members and those into gangsta chic. (There is a sequel, Red Zone, which I have never had a chance to read, sadly.)


    What is tolerance? It is the consequence of humanity. We are all formed of frailty and error; let us pardon reciprocally each other's folly. That is the first law of nature.
    Voltaire, "Tolerance" (1764)

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    • Originally posted by No One of Consequence View Post

      Not yet, but I plan to. I up grew watching stuff like HBO's 1st & Ten and Major League, so while I've never been a sports fan, per say, I do have an enjoyment of some of the behind the scenes drama and weirdness. One book in particular I'll plug is Mike Lupica's 2000 novel Bump and Run, about a fictional NFL team (the NY Hawks). The single most PENTEXy bit, in terms of "yeah,they would totally do that", is a rival team, the LA Bangers, who were named and marketed entirely to appeal to streetgang members and those into gangsta chic. (There is a sequel, Red Zone, which I have never had a chance to read, sadly.)

      Those ARE excellent sources. The XFL would be another good thing to research. While they didn't have the LA Bangers, they were very much anti-NFL(and Pentex-ish) in the way they conducted their business. Which makes sense since the CEO of the XFL was Vince McMahon of the WWE.


      PENTEX SUCKS.

      I'm a gamer. I'm conservative. We exist.

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      • Originally posted by Fat Larry View Post
        Those ARE excellent sources. The XFL would be another good thing to research. While they didn't have the LA Bangers, they were very much anti-NFL(and Pentex-ish) in the way they conducted their business. Which makes sense since the CEO of the XFL was Vince McMahon of the WWE.
        Vince would've jumped all over a name like the Bangers. The XFL was just weird. I fully expect at some point it will be the basis for a comedy film similar to Semi-Pro with the ABA. Both the Wrestling With Wregret and Company Man YouTube channels have pretty good videos about it from different perspectives. Even weirder was Vince's attempt at a pro body building federation. If prowrestling has another major boom period, I'm curious what he'll blow money on then. I'm hoping it's a space ship. 🤔

        I'm also reminded of George Carlin's ideas for making baseball more exciting, such as randomly placed landmines in the outfield.
        Last edited by No One of Consequence; 12-31-2018, 04:35 PM.


        What is tolerance? It is the consequence of humanity. We are all formed of frailty and error; let us pardon reciprocally each other's folly. That is the first law of nature.
        Voltaire, "Tolerance" (1764)

        Comment


        • Cue jumbotron from The Naked Gun showing footage of tiger intercepting a runner at second base...

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          • SLAUGHTERHOUSE VIDEO
            So, this one is going to be a little long winded, as it's a subject near and dear to my heart. I'm part of Generation X, which means I grew up during both the VHS video rental boom and the aftermath of the Golden Age of Slasher Films (79 to 84). This means I saw a lot of cheap and schlocky horror films on video or late night cable while growing up. (Fred Dekker's 1986 masterpiece Night of the Creeps is one of the greatest films ever made and I will fight you over this.) Slaughterhouse Video is one of the first PENTEX companies, appearing in the original Book of the Wyrm, and being repeated in both Freak Legion and the 2nd ed Book of the Wyrm. The Gorehound is a fan favorite among fomori breeds and for good reason. Besides the idea that something like Jason Voorhees (at least the Part 6 and onward version) could easily go toe to toe with a Garou and win, these jacked up murder machines also make a sort of dark mirror one can hold up to the Garou and comment on their violent behavior. Unfortunately, the salad days of VHS and even DVDs have passed, so the original method of putting Banes in the cassettes (or discs) is no longer as productive. They've likely moved on to trying to stream Banes directly over the internet (working with Tellus, Sunburst and OMNI). But this raises a (to me, at least) interesting question: Was Slaughterhouse around before the VHS age, and if so, what were they doing?

            Based in a converted Catholic chapel in Paris, Le Theatre de Grand-Guignol specialized in putting on extremely realistic and very graphic horror shows. Running from 1897 to 1962, its zenith was in the 1920s, and it spawned imitations in London and other cities. One of the weirder aspects is that a number of customers came for the “stimulation”, and would have sexual trysts in the theater’s boxes. This connection between sex and violence is something the Grand Guignol shares with the Slasher genre, and may offer a possible origin for the people behind Slaughterhouse. A theater of this type putting on performances which blur - and in the World of Darkness, most certainly cross - the line between illusion and actual murder, and could transform spiritually or psychologically vulnerable viewers into murderers themselves. Mel Gordon’s Theatre of Fear & Horror is a good overview of the Grand Guignol, including the tricks behind some of their special effects and synopsis of several plays. French horror writer Maurice Level had a number of this stories adapted into plays by the Theatre, and Dover Horror Classics’ Thirty Hours with a Corpse and Other Tales of the Grand Guignol is a good collection of his work. Neil Gaiman and Michael Zulii’s The Last Temptation is a companion to the Alice Cooper album of the same name, and features a malevolent Showman and his own haunted Grand Guignol. (It’s a personal favorite of mine, and influences my take on both versions of Changeling.) Gaiman’s short story “Facts in the Case of the Departure of Miss Finch” also involves a modern underground theater of weirdness, and is worth reading. (I find the Guignol and its contemporaries such as the Weimar German Kabarett to make really great settings for 1920s chronicles, especially if you’re looking for some sort of crossover with Vampire, Mage’s Hollow Ones, or Changeling.)

            Before home video, the only way to see movies was at a movie theater. The Grindhouse was the term used for (usually urban) theaters that specialized in material that was sensationalistic, low budget or both, and were for adults only. The 1960s and 70s were their boom period, showing everything from film noir and “naturalist documentaries” to martial arts films and horror movies. A few genres of note are “roughies” (sexploitation films that focused on sexual violence against women), rape revenge films (I Spit on Your Grave being one of the most infamous), “mondo” (sensationalistic pseudo documentaries such as Cannibal Holocaust and the Faces of Death series), Italian Giallo horror films, and the early zombie films. As with the Grand Guignol, the Grindhouse offers the chance for, say, Bane infested films (or even the theater building itself) finding spiritually vulnerable or mentally unstable viewers and turning them into violent antisocial deviants. Bill Landis and Michelle Clifford’s Sleazoid Express is an interesting look at the Grindhouse scene in 60s and 70s New York, and a cool piece of inspiration if you want to doing a Rage Across NY chronicle involving the time period or the scene. There’s a 2010 documentary American Grindhouse that’s mostly about exploitation films in general, but still interesting. If you are really seriously into the history of horror films, Randy Palmer’s biography of Herschell Gordon Lewis, Godfather of Gore is interesting. Lewis’s 1963 film Blood Feast is one of the earliest “splatter” horror films.

            The period between 1978 and 1984 is often called the Golden Age of Slasher Films. With the massive success of John Carpenter’s Halloween, a lot of other low budget studios wanted to get in on that profit. A lot of slasher style films came out in this period, including the first few Friday the 13th movies and the first Nightmare on Elm Street. Richard Nowell’s Blood Money is a fairly solid history of the this period and the people behind it, including some of the misconceptions about it. Adam Rockoff’s Going to Pieces: The Rise and Fall of the Slasher Film is also a good overview of the entire genre. Never Sleep Again is a good - and long at nearly 3 hours - documentary of the entire Nightmare on Elm Street series. Camp Crystal Lake Memories and His Name Was Jason are a pair of documentaries about the Friday the 13th movies. This is, of course, the era that most inspires the original Slaughterhouse write up. Sadly, by the start of the 90s, the genre had essentially degenerated into bad parody. The late 90s revival kicked off by Scream in 1996 tended to be a lot more tame than its predecessors, and not really the sort of thing that Slaughterhouse would’ve been interested in. However, the start of the 21st century saw a wave of so-called “torture pr-n” with things like Hostel, Saw, and The Human Centipede, as well as a glut of remakes of 70s and 80s slasher-type horror films (to varying degrees of success). This is the sort of material Slaughterhouse would jump all over, turning out material that keeps “raising the bar” with each release and having special effects that “seem real enough to blur the line between fantasy and reality”. Which brings me to the next topic.

            The so-called snuff film is a long standing bit of urban lore. To the best of my knowledge, there’s never been conclusive evidence that such films exists, at least in the sense of them being available for sale in the underground black market. But in the days of the deep web/dark web, it’s hard to tell. And in the World of Darkness, they are almost certainly a real thing. The film 8MM (1999) is a pretty decent performance by Nicolas Cage as a detective trying to verify the authenticity of such a film by delving into the seedy underworld of LA’s adult film scene. (In a similar vein, I also recommend the 1979 film Hardcore, starting George C. Scott as a father trying to track down his runaway daughter after he sees her in a stag film.) It’s very likely that more than a few novice actors who signed up to star in a Slaughterhouse film ended up not surviving the experience. Added to this is the “found footage” craze that The Blair Witch Project helped kick off. This gets used a lot in horror films, and in the case of Slaughterhouse, such things could easily be real murders filmed by real serial killers. A potential example of this is Fred Vogel’s August Underground. Made to look like a found footage home VHS tape of two men brutally r-p-ing and murdering a woman, it’s something I’ve no real interest in ever seeing. But as I said, it makes a good example of the sort of thing the modern Slaughterhouse might be putting out.

            For other modern activities, while they likely still produce and sell cheap DVDs (or BluRays) with their tradition Bane imbeds, and have moved on to the sort of streaming service model I mentioned at the beginning, there are other, less legal, avenues to explore. The movie Untraceable (2008) is based around the idea of a serial killer who sets up an website where people watch someone be murdered. The more people who watch, the faster the victim is tortured to death. Slaughterhouse DVDs likely include secret passcodes to get in to such underground web sites. The concept of a bunch of people stranded on an island and forced to fight each other to the death is a commonly used trope, with such things as Battle Royale (2000), The Condemned (2007) and The Hunger Games (2008) all drawing on it. The PS2 game Manhunt was also based on a similar idea, and offers ideas for corporate synergy between Slaughterhouse and Tellus. Stephen King’s novel The Running Man, and the 1987 Schwarzenegger film lovely based on it also provide a variation on the idea of death as televised amusement. Finally, The Cabin in the Woods (2012) offers up the idea of a slasher film being acted out on unsuspecting victims as an offering to dark primordial gods.

            Finally, if you’ve never read it, I highly recommend the World of Darkness: Slashers sourcebook for nWoD/CoD’s Hunter the Vigil line. It’s full of a lot of great material and ideas for building a better Gorehound, or for more cerebral variations based different types of films. As for the development of a Gorehound, Rob Zombie's remake of Halloween (2007) offers some ideas.



            What is tolerance? It is the consequence of humanity. We are all formed of frailty and error; let us pardon reciprocally each other's folly. That is the first law of nature.
            Voltaire, "Tolerance" (1764)

            Comment


            • Originally posted by No One of Consequence View Post
              SLAUGHTERHOUSE VIDEO
              The Gorehound is a fan favorite among fomori breeds and for good reason. Besides the idea that something like Jason Voorhees (at least the Part 6 and onward version) could easily go toe to toe with a Garou and win,
              Excellent entry.

              And I tried telling a Facebook group that was arguing over what splat Jason Voorhees would be, and that he was a Gorehound. But was met with mostly silence. Many were saying that he was Risen.

              I was like, 'guys, the fucking picture in Freak Legion is of a guy wearing a hockey mask. There is a short story using the name "Jason"!

              Jason Voorhees is definitely a Gorehound.



              PENTEX SUCKS.

              I'm a gamer. I'm conservative. We exist.

              Comment


              • Originally posted by Fat Larry View Post
                Jason Voorhees is definitely a Gorehound.
                Yeah, he's pretty much the primary inspiration for the Gorehounds. Although, a Spectre consumed Risen would be a fairly nightmarish antagonist.

                One reason I mention WoD: Slashers is that I think the Gorehound breed could have started to evolve into different strains. The traditional masked silent brutes in the vein of Jason and Michael Myers, more mental and technical oriented ones like Jigsaw and the Collector, and even socially adroit killers like Patrick Bateman.

                I think if there were to be some sort of sourcebook about fomori breeds (A Freak Legion Revisited or something), the Gorehound would be in my top three of ones I'd want to see developed and expanded on. (The others being Fomori Families and Hollow Men, who I think could become as diverse as Vampire's revenant families and Forsaken's Hosts, respectively.)


                What is tolerance? It is the consequence of humanity. We are all formed of frailty and error; let us pardon reciprocally each other's folly. That is the first law of nature.
                Voltaire, "Tolerance" (1764)

                Comment


                • Originally posted by No One of Consequence View Post

                  Yeah, he's pretty much the primary inspiration for the Gorehounds. Although, a Spectre consumed Risen would be a fairly nightmarish antagonist.

                  One reason I mention WoD: Slashers is that I think the Gorehound breed could have started to evolve into different strains. The traditional masked silent brutes in the vein of Jason and Michael Myers, more mental and technical oriented ones like Jigsaw and the Collector, and even socially adroit killers like Patrick Bateman.

                  I think if there were to be some sort of sourcebook about fomori breeds (A Freak Legion Revisited or something), the Gorehound would be in my top three of ones I'd want to see developed and expanded on. (The others being Fomori Families and Hollow Men, who I think could become as diverse as Vampire's revenant families and Forsaken's Hosts, respectively.)

                  Well, there was a "new" Gorehound in the W20 Book of the Wyrm. Sort of like the Patrick Bateman type. So there's that.

                  But a WoD: Slashers would be amazing. You hear that, Modiphius?


                  PENTEX SUCKS.

                  I'm a gamer. I'm conservative. We exist.

                  Comment


                  • It occurs to me that it might be possible to trace the evolution of gorehounds back to the legend of the minotaur. Something I'll have to look into over the weekend.

                    Added: This seems to make an interesting possibility. You have this highly ritualized sacrifice of 14 youths to this massive faceless unspeaking brute which stalks and kills them in a set location ("Camp Crystal Labyrinth"). Especially if you wanted to work in something similar to The Cabin in the Woods.

                    The next step might be among Roman gladiators, with such brutes killing each other and helpless victims for the entertainment of the bloodthirsty masses.
                    Last edited by No One of Consequence; 01-19-2019, 06:15 PM.


                    What is tolerance? It is the consequence of humanity. We are all formed of frailty and error; let us pardon reciprocally each other's folly. That is the first law of nature.
                    Voltaire, "Tolerance" (1764)

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by No One of Consequence View Post
                      It occurs to me that it might be possible to trace the evolution of gorehounds back to the legend of the minotaur. Something I'll have to look into over the weekend.

                      Added: This seems to make an interesting possibility. You have this highly ritualized sacrifice of 14 youths to this massive faceless unspeaking brute which stalks and kills them in a set location ("Camp Crystal Labyrinth&quot. Especially if you wanted to work in something similar to The Cabin in the Woods.

                      The next step might be among Roman gladiators, with such brutes killing each other and helpless victims for the entertainment of the bloodthirsty masses.
                      If I recall correctly, the Minotaur legend in the WoD was suppose to be inspired by the last Apis.

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                      • Yeah, I think the original Children of Gaia tribe book said something to that effect. (It was the one that originated the idea of were-cattle and were-swine, IIRC). I've honestly always found the Apis kind of weird, mainly because they are the only ones whose animal isn't a carnivore or omnivore. I've occasionally toyed with the idea where the three lost breeds (cows, pigs and bats) are, along with some of the new PENTEX-manufactured breeds and some of the stuff from Forsaken's War Against the Pure, are all a collection of fallen Fera, having been corrupted before, during or after the first War of Rage.

                        BTW, I'm actually kind of surprised that none of the WW20 material has ever introduced the were-orangutans mentioned in the 1st ed corebook.


                        What is tolerance? It is the consequence of humanity. We are all formed of frailty and error; let us pardon reciprocally each other's folly. That is the first law of nature.
                        Voltaire, "Tolerance" (1764)

                        Comment


                        • Outside of their intended purpose, Apis are weird. The intended purposes the werebeasts were suppose to have are a nice touch for the setting. It keeps things from getting silly like in a lot of Urban Fantasy when thycanthropy gets taken too far.

                          The were-orangutans were mentioned in 2nd edition too (the first edition I had). I remember one of my friends announced, after looking through the Fera section of the players guide, "Where the hell are the were-apes?"

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                          • Originally posted by Onkwe View Post
                            The were-orangutans were mentioned in 2nd edition too (the first edition I had). I remember one of my friends announced, after looking through the Fera section of the players guide, "Where the hell are the were-apes?"
                            Now? As Stockbrokers and Lawyers for Pentex - Just Yeren

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                            • Originally posted by No One of Consequence View Post
                              Yeah, I think the original Children of Gaia tribe book said something to that effect. (It was the one that originated the idea of were-cattle and were-swine, IIRC). I've honestly always found the Apis kind of weird, mainly because they are the only ones whose animal isn't a carnivore or omnivore. I've occasionally toyed with the idea where the three lost breeds (cows, pigs and bats) are, along with some of the new PENTEX-manufactured breeds and some of the stuff from Forsaken's War Against the Pure, are all a collection of fallen Fera, having been corrupted before, during or after the first War of Rage.

                              BTW, I'm actually kind of surprised that none of the WW20 material has ever introduced the were-orangutans mentioned in the 1st ed corebook.

                              I kind of like the idea Pentex isn't doing something crazy powerful that only Gaia can match vs reanimating lost and dead bits.

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                              • Since we're on the subject of were-cows ...

                                The Dairy Industry

                                Dairy is a big industry around the world, mostly focused on cows, but also including goats, sheep, buffalo, camels and even horses. Criticism of said industry usually revolves around issues of animal welfare and vegan-oriented diet. However, other aspects involve the general health of eating/drinking dairy, conspiracy theories about disease vectors, and the use of bovine growth hormone. Over the past decade, there's also been a number of anti-trust cases and price fixing charges brought about. A PENTEX dairy company is likely to focus on big factory farms, industrial milking machines and massive levels of hormones. Maybe also some sort of weird man-eating dairy cattle.

                                There are a couple of books on the history of milk. Mark Kurlansky, who has previously done books about Paper, Salt, and Cod, among other things, has recently written Milk!: A 10,000 Year Old Food Fracas, which sadly I've not had the chance to read yet, but his work has always been interesting and entertaining. Deborah Valenze's Milk: A Local and Global History is also good. Ron Schmid's The Untold Story of Milk is more about raw milk and the recent raw milk "movement", but still interesting. Kirk Kardashian's Milk Money is a critique of the modern dairy farm industry and it's negative impact on traditional small dairy farmers.

                                One of the most wonderful things which can be made from milk is butter, which is the subject of Elaine Khosrova's Butter: A Rich History.

                                Then there is ice cream, which is itself a huge business. Marilyn Powell's Ice Cream: The Delicious History covers a lot of the basics. There are a number of famous brand names, including Haagen-Dazs (which was bought by Pillsbury, who was bought by General Mills, which then sold it to Nestle, going back to the octopus I mentioned under Young & Smith) and Ben & Jerry's (now owned by Unilever), as well as various regional brands. (Next time you're at the store, you can try looking up various brand names to see who ultimately owns them.) Brad Edmondson's Ice Cream Social is a decent history of the Ben & Jerry's Brand. While B&J is rather famous for it's progressive social causes, there have been accusations over the years that they've deliberately allowed themselves as their reputation to be used in efforts be other companies at "greenwashing", or trying to cover up their existing environmental problems with good press. John Stauber and Sheldon Rampton's Toxic Sludge is Good For You, written in the 90s about the public relations industry, talks about this at length. (Even though it's 20 years old and blatantly left-leaning to the point of falling over, it's still an interesting book and very well worth reading for PENTEX.)

                                Modern Marvels did episodes on Milk, Cheese, and Ice Cream, which you can probably find on YouTube.

                                There's not a lot of horror fiction revolving around dairy. A slight exception is that the 1976 film Food of the Gods (based on an HG Wells story about a substance which caused creatures to grow to monstrous size) ends with the material in question getting washed down stream and eventually into the food supply of a dairy farm, with the milk then ending up at an elementary school. The 1989 direct to video sequel showed some of the after effects of this, apparently with the idea of using it to set up another sequel which never came about. Similarly, a 90s era Marvel Comics miniseries, The Skrull Kill Krew was based around the idea that, when Reed Richards turned a group of Skrulls into cows at the end of the very first issue of The Fantastic Four, their milk ended up causing mutations in some human children, and now that the children were adult(ish), there were out to murder any Skrulls hiding among humanity. So, there you have the idea of people - especially children - being turned into fomori by PENTEX milk, which is honestly rather unsettling, especially if a pack of Garou find themselves forced to fight such things. This could possibly lead to a lot of psychological and even spiritual trauma for said characters.
                                There's also an early X-Files episode, "Red Museum", from season two, set in Wisconsin and tangental involving local dairy farming and hormone injections.


                                What is tolerance? It is the consequence of humanity. We are all formed of frailty and error; let us pardon reciprocally each other's folly. That is the first law of nature.
                                Voltaire, "Tolerance" (1764)

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