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Where are the Gonren? (Asian Bone Gnawers)

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  • Where are the Gonren? (Asian Bone Gnawers)

    I was looking through my Asian-themed WoD books for ideas for a potential Beast Courts campaign. I currently have Kindred of the East, Hengeyokai, World of Darkness: Hong Kong, and Demon Hunter X. However, I recently bought Dragons of the East (The Asian Mage book) and I found something while skimming through it I couldn't find in any of my other books (that I own, that is).

    In the fourth chapter dealing with other supernatural creatures, while it brought up the Hakken (who have a big section in the Hengeyokai book), it also brought up a group of werewolves I had never heard of before.

    The Gonren - Wu Lung have long used this derogatory term -"dog people"- to refer to werewolf bandits and would-be peasant folk-heroes who have continuously made a nuisance of themselves since the Fourth Age. They are found leading rural bandit gangs or urban tongs, but over the years, more and more have found their way into Hong Kong's corporate culture. A few have even become diehard supporters of communism. In general, these bandits ignore the Chi'n Ta, with the exception of the Wu Lung, whom they seem to take a delight in harassing.

    Dragons of the East, P. 90-91
    To me, it sound like the Gonren are to Bone Gnawers as the Hakken are to Shadow Lords since "bandits and would-be peasant folk-heroes" makes me think of the Hood camp. (Perhaps they have some Glass Walkers in their numbers, what with the whole "corporate culture" but the Glass Walkers already have the Boli Zouhisze so I don't know)

    However, other than this short section, I cannot find any other info on the Gonren. I have scoured through the above books and the Bone Gnawer Tribebooks (Both original and Revised) but have turned up nothing. Unless I missed something, are there any other books out there that might have more fluff or is Dragons of the East the only time they are brought up?

  • #2
    They weren’t detailed that great in fact they forgot/didn’t bother to mention them when the players guide to the Garou Revised gave a census. I mean it seems odd to me Hakken was listed as populous as the main tribe, in the 1kish range, so I would like to think Rat should have more children then Grandfather thunder, but by the book all Gnawers seem lumped together, that means Rat Breaks even with Thunder and that’s odd. They should have made Hakken one of the 400ish number tribe since they are a sub tribe.


    It is a time for great deeds!

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    • #3
      Page 34 of Hengeyokai is about the only place they are really mentioned. They call themselves the Wangtong, which can be roughly interpreted as both "society of kings" and "brotherhood of bastards" depending on what characters are used to write it. (This is my layman's understanding of the Chinese language; if any expert knows more, please chime in.) To my knowledge, they are functionality identical to the Western Bone Gnawers, but probably have a few unique Camps and Gifts reflecting their cultural background.

      The other two mentioned on that page are the Boli Zousizhe (Glasswalkers) and Scarlet Talons.


      What is tolerance? It is the consequence of humanity. We are all formed of frailty and error; let us pardon reciprocally each other's folly. That is the first law of nature.
      Voltaire, "Tolerance" (1764)

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      • #4
        What does boli zousizhe translate to anyway?

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        • #5
          As near as I know, "boli" means glass and "zou" means walk. I'm unsure what the sizhe part means.


          What is tolerance? It is the consequence of humanity. We are all formed of frailty and error; let us pardon reciprocally each other's folly. That is the first law of nature.
          Voltaire, "Tolerance" (1764)

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          • #6
            Originally posted by No One of Consequence View Post
            As near as I know, "boli" means glass and "zou" means walk. I'm unsure what the sizhe part means.

            That is much less fun.

            Hmm a quick Google Search seems to also allow "Small Profit Smuggler" but its a matter of characters were intended.
            Last edited by Lian; 03-10-2019, 04:22 AM.

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            • #7
              Yeah, between character usage, dialects, and subtle shadings of pronunciation changing meanings, Chinese is sometimes a pain to figure out proper translations for.

              I still wish there had been a Beast Courts Companion sourcebook that had two page spreads for all the non-Hakken tribes: Stargazers, Wangtong, Boli Zousizhe, Scarlet Talons, Mongolian Silent Striders, the Firehair Fianna, recent Uktena arrivals, and Ainu Wendigo, and what relations, if any, they have with the Courts.


              What is tolerance? It is the consequence of humanity. We are all formed of frailty and error; let us pardon reciprocally each other's folly. That is the first law of nature.
              Voltaire, "Tolerance" (1764)

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by No One of Consequence View Post
                Yeah, between character usage, dialects, and subtle shadings of pronunciation changing meanings, Chinese is sometimes a pain to figure out proper translations for.

                I still wish there had been a Beast Courts Companion sourcebook that had two page spreads for all the non-Hakken tribes: Stargazers, Wangtong, Boli Zousizhe, Scarlet Talons, Mongolian Silent Striders, the Firehair Fianna, recent Uktena arrivals, and Ainu Wendigo, and what relations, if any, they have with the Courts.

                Where are the Mongolian Silent striders referfenced? I Know the Firehair are in new Rage Across the world.. also I thought the Ainu were Uktena(I Know Tribebook Uktena claims these are "recent" inbreedings but DA werewolf has.. Uktena in many of the Indiginous minorities of the East like the Ainu.. Honestly I'd consider going so far as to giving them a new name, though perhaps more directly connected to their fellows than the Hakken and the Shadowlords)

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                • #9
                  The revised Silent Striders tribebook. The Firehair originally appeared in A World of Rage. The Ainu are kind of a grey area. There are Wendigo in eastern Siberia, including the areas bordering the Sea of Okhotsk, which is just north of Hokkaido, so I tend to go with that for my games. The Uktena are also a little bit of an oddity, as Werewolf material was sometimes back and forth on where they were and for how long (and sometimes seeming to be somewhere just because). My personal head canon is that the Three Brothers believe they and their kin were created by Gaia in the Pure Lands for the Pure Lands, and that this whole landbridge idea is a bunch of Wyrmbringer nonsense right up there with Silver Fang kingship and trusting government treaties. (Yes, I know this contradicts the stuff in the tribebooks, but I'm just unable to say "Tribe Sasquatch" with a straight face; I blame John Byrne and Alpha Flight.) So to me, the Uktena trying to settle in Africa, Australia, Finland, and elsewhere is something that started at the very end of the 19th century as a direct reaction to the Storm Eater, with the tribe being deeply concerned about what other ancient bound spirits and monsters European imperialism might accidentally be setting loose, and the death of the Bunyip, trying to preserve the secrets and lore of endangered cultures. Other people may prefer differently.


                  What is tolerance? It is the consequence of humanity. We are all formed of frailty and error; let us pardon reciprocally each other's folly. That is the first law of nature.
                  Voltaire, "Tolerance" (1764)

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by No One of Consequence View Post
                    The revised Silent Striders tribebook. The Firehair originally appeared in A World of Rage. The Ainu are kind of a grey area. There are Wendigo in eastern Siberia, including the areas bordering the Sea of Okhotsk, which is just north of Hokkaido, so I tend to go with that for my games. The Uktena are also a little bit of an oddity, as Werewolf material was sometimes back and forth on where they were and for how long (and sometimes seeming to be somewhere just because). My personal head canon is that the Three Brothers believe they and their kin were created by Gaia in the Pure Lands for the Pure Lands, and that this whole landbridge idea is a bunch of Wyrmbringer nonsense right up there with Silver Fang kingship and trusting government treaties. (Yes, I know this contradicts the stuff in the tribebooks, but I'm just unable to say "Tribe Sasquatch" with a straight face; I blame John Byrne and Alpha Flight.) So to me, the Uktena trying to settle in Africa, Australia, Finland, and elsewhere is something that started at the very end of the 19th century as a direct reaction to the Storm Eater, with the tribe being deeply concerned about what other ancient bound spirits and monsters European imperialism might accidentally be setting loose, and the death of the Bunyip, trying to preserve the secrets and lore of endangered cultures. Other people may prefer differently.
                    Honestly the Purelands Tribes were created in the Purelands... leads to questions on "why do First Nations people have Delerium" and "So the Purelands tribes had theirown unrelated Wars of Rage"? Mind you I kind of prefer each Tribe being Splitters rather than "Gaia Made Werewolves 16+ times"

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                    • #11
                      They still had their own Impergium. And their beliefs may not be entirely correct either. But it is their own origin myth, at least in my games.


                      What is tolerance? It is the consequence of humanity. We are all formed of frailty and error; let us pardon reciprocally each other's folly. That is the first law of nature.
                      Voltaire, "Tolerance" (1764)

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