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How to refer to the Indian Shadowlands

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  • How to refer to the Indian Shadowlands

    So Swar is an Tempest realm like Stygia, but how does one refer to its broader territorial holdings? If one takes a world map and label's Stygia's territory "Dark Kingdom of Iron", and labels the East Asian Shadowlands "Yellow Springs", etc, how would the Indian Shadowlands be labeled?


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  • #2
    Wraith 20th has the following entry in the Svarga lexicon:

    Svarga: Used by Indian wraiths to refer to the Loka of the Host
    of [Svarga], wherein lies the City of Delights. Often used by
    outsiders to refer to the entire Dark Kingdom.

    Indian wraiths themselves call their Shadowlands Bhuvar.


    Scion 2E: What We Know - A wiki compiling info on second edition Scion.

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    • #3
      Ah, I see there's been a terminology change (probably making it more accurate to Sanskrit) that was confusing me. Thanks you!


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      • #4
        How I'm inclined to assume it works...

        Bhu loka: Skinlands

        Bhuvar loka: Shadowlands

        Svarga loka: their ruling Near Realm

        Mahar loka: Far Shores


        Jana loka, Tapa loka, and Satya loka are generally beyond the reach of the unreincarnated dead, but are realms of divinity some mystics can access (*cough*High, Middle, and Deep Umbras*cough*)


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        • #5
          I do wish there was a common name in Stygian nomenclature though - it's not like they're shy about applying their "Dark Kingdom of____" moniker wherever else they feel like it.


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          • #6
            Dark Kingdom of Diamond? Apparently India is where they were first mined/discovered, and were used in the making of religious sculptures, treatment of illness and protection from harm, among other things. (From my admittedly limited understanding, the ancient Hindus classified them as eight different types by color, which may mean that in the underworld they have different mystical properties.)


            What is tolerance? It is the consequence of humanity. We are all formed of frailty and error; let us pardon reciprocally each other's folly. That is the first law of nature.
            Voltaire, "Tolerance" (1764)

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            • #7
              Originally posted by No One of Consequence View Post
              Dark Kingdom of Diamond? Apparently India is where they were first mined/discovered, and were used in the making of religious sculptures, treatment of illness and protection from harm, among other things. (From my admittedly limited understanding, the ancient Hindus classified them as eight different types by color, which may mean that in the underworld they have different mystical properties.)
              I'd suggest Dark Kingdom of Incense instead. It is something that external cultures, especially Westerners, would easily tend to associate with India, rather more so than diamonds IMO, both because it is its main producer and it was extensively used since Vedic times, and it is tied with an strong presence of religion in society, also something that may easily be associated with India (especially after Stygia absorbed the Middle East). Diamond is nowhere so distinctive in comparison.

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              • #8
                I'd considered that, but all of the others seemed to be material things like Iron, Jade, Ivory, Flint, Obsidian, Gold, Clay, Sand, etc. (I've taken to referring to the Polynesian regions as the Dark Kingdoms of Coral for similar reasons.)


                What is tolerance? It is the consequence of humanity. We are all formed of frailty and error; let us pardon reciprocally each other's folly. That is the first law of nature.
                Voltaire, "Tolerance" (1764)

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by No One of Consequence View Post
                  I'd considered that, but all of the others seemed to be material things like Iron, Jade, Ivory, Flint, Obsidian, Gold, Clay, Sand, etc. (I've taken to referring to the Polynesian regions as the Dark Kingdoms of Coral for similar reasons.)
                  Last time I checked, Incense is a material thing.

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                  • #10
                    I meant in the sense of hard solids - in the case of Europe, East Asia and Africa, materials that they apparently use in the making of powerful Relics (Soulsteal, True Jade, etc). 'Thou the idea of the Indian underworld having an entire art and industry built around the creation of Relic incense, camphor, resins and other scent and fire oriented items sounds potentially interesting.


                    What is tolerance? It is the consequence of humanity. We are all formed of frailty and error; let us pardon reciprocally each other's folly. That is the first law of nature.
                    Voltaire, "Tolerance" (1764)

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                    • #11
                      What about “Dark Kingdom of Indigo”, given that that term does come from the Indus Valley? Ancient Greeks even called in Sindhi dye.


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                      • #12
                        There was already a thread that suggested the Dark Kingdom of Incense for Western Asia, North West Africa and the Middle East . . . Not the same territory as yours, of course.

                        Here's the thread: http://forum.theonyxpath.com/forum/m...dom-of-incense

                        It was very interesting. Though the Dark Kingdom of Cedar was mooted as a possible alternative name, with soulforged wraiths forming ghostly trees that lined the palace that may have once belonged to Gilgamesh or the Queen of Sheba or some other legendary figure.

                        Another name for Swar could be the Dark Kingdom of Flowers, perhaps? National symbols include the lotus, lion, wheel or mango, apparently: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nati...mbols_of_India
                        Last edited by adambeyoncelowe; 02-22-2018, 04:41 PM.

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                        • #13
                          What about the Dark Kingdom of Marble? Along with being known for several famous pieces of architecture made of or inlaid with marble (e.g the Taj Mahal), India also plays host to a number of marble colors and varieties not found anywhere else in the world. To an outsider, seeing these striking, brightly-colored stone buildings would make a huge first impression.

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                          • #14
                            It's a stone, too, so fits with Flint and Obsidian.

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