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When you close your eyes and imagine Stygia, what do you see?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Matt the Bruins fan View Post
    I think my visual idea of it was shaped by Guy Davis' art in the 2nd edition corebook, so I've always thought of it as lots of dilapidated industrial spaces, oil refineries, and the like. Under a constantly black, starless sky.
    Yes, all of Davis' art actually. For locations, anyway.
    Also,
    Originally posted by Ajax View Post
    damp
    I don't believe that a psychic realm built on memories and emotion would be damp unless specific locations have dampness associated with them. Like, the Titanic would be damp, but the Underworld as a whole is not.

    Cheers!


    If you don't use an Oxford comma, I feel bad for you, son,
    'Cuz I got ninety-nine problems, but clarity ain't one.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by nothing View Post
      Also,I don't believe that a psychic realm built on memories and emotion would be damp unless specific locations have dampness associated with them. Like, the Titanic would be damp, but the Underworld as a whole is not.
      Having had the opportunity to spend a great deal of time in graves and with corpses in various stages of decay as well as picking my way through well-past-its-prime architecture, outright ruins, the remains of same and more, I will tell you as a front-line observer, that a great deal of that which is associated with death seems "damp". "Dank" too. Even the dry stuff has to be REALLY dry for it not to give some visceral sense of slickness/moisture/etc.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Ajax View Post
        Having had the opportunity to spend a great deal of time in graves and with corpses in various stages of decay as well as picking my way through well-past-its-prime architecture, outright ruins, the remains of same and more, I will tell you as a front-line observer, that a great deal of that which is associated with death seems "damp". "Dank" too. Even the dry stuff has to be REALLY dry for it not to give some visceral sense of slickness/moisture/etc.
        I've always liked "moist." Have you heard Carig Ferguson's bit on dampness? Always gets a chuckle. But again, I don't think a psychic realm literally created from memory and emotion is going to have a lot of association with wetness - though I do believe that one of the books describes the walls and corridors deep in the Labyrinth, around the Mouth of Oblivion, as "dank" but that might be White Wolf's purple prose striking again.

        Cheers!


        If you don't use an Oxford comma, I feel bad for you, son,
        'Cuz I got ninety-nine problems, but clarity ain't one.

        Comment


        • #19
          I imagine both dank and dry, due to the wide range of climates and seasons buildings have been destroyed in, and the strong resonance of some of those events. Buildings brought down from Reimerswaal are always going to drip and creak from waterlogging, while those from Tunis that lay buried for centuries beneath the sand might - even if they originally came down without it - eventually have an unpleasantly gritty feeling from the memory of that sand.

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          • #20
            One of the defining elements of Stygia, to me, is that it is built from the parts of human cities, but it was built by and for old ghosts who were dead much longer than they were ever alive. City planning, to the extent that it exists at all, will have little to do with human limitations. The remnants of Carthage might be grand, but that doesn't stop them from being used as tenement housing and structural support. The old fishmarked sewer tunnels of Rome might be used as office space for mid level management. Things should be slightly off, the grandiosity still exists but the context is thin.


            Mage: The Ice-ension: An Epic Game of Reality on the Rink

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            • #21
              I did close my eyes and the first thing that came to my mind was it being like the city in the film, Metropolis. Only more ghostly, weary-looking and having bits of mixed eras in it.


              See my splat, Angel: The Revelation (With a MUCH better link): https://docs.google.com/document/d/1...qUnP1fcl-0/pub

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              • #22
                If anyone is still wondering what the 'official' vision is, one of the short stories digs into it. Lots of dust, lots of decaying marble and crumbling stone, lots of grotesque classical architecture.

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                • #23
                  Basically Gotham City from Tim Burton's Batman (1989) crossed with The Neither-World of Beetlejuice the Animated Series (1992)

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                  • #24
                    The "sky" would be gray and cloudy, if it can be watched, because I imagine the WoD underworld without a gravity like our world but how.. the movies "upside down", "Inception" or "Doctor Strange", or the city Sigil from D&D Planescape. the plane Bytopia, and the MC Escher's picture "Relatively", when the sky is a second floor with opposite gravity.

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                    • #25
                      Like a hive city from 40k. But with less skulls, and nicer monsters lurking in its depths.

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                      • #26
                        I mainly play 1st edition Wraith and as such, I see Stygia as a place a wraith really doesn't want to be sent to, as if one finds themself sent there, they're pretty much going to get soul-forged or sent into the Veinous Stairway for mining duty until they Spectre or fall into Oblivion...

                        That said, I see it as a large sort of olden walled city, similar to the ones in Assassin's Creed 2, with that monochrome filter. The Isle of Iron is pretty much completely covered by these large towers walled in until you get the largest tower peering over where the Deathlords dwell... It's a place of sheer adject horror though due in part to the Sea of Souls surrounding the island, which I picture as screaming people bound with barbed wire all along the risen cliff faces of the Isle and spilling over out into the freezing stormy waters...

                        Smoke pours up like mini maelstroms from chimneys as the indentured wraiths down below work to mine death ore from the Labyrinth and the soulforges. The screams of the damned echo through the starlit night of the nihils overhead and various roads and train tracks branch out from it's industrial era hive out through the Sea to the Shadowlands...

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