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Reference and Research for Dark Eras 2

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  • #16
    The Directory of Open Access Journals may also be useful.


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    • #17
      I actually just startered reading Halsall's book based of the recommendation Arcanist . He is delightlyfuly sarcastic and smarmy in Chapter 1. I love it.

      In other news, the Greek, Roman, and Byzantine Stuides Journal is Open Access and you can read all of their issues back to 1958. There's a lot of neat articles I've read already and while I haven't stumbled on anything useful for DE2 yet, I'm sure there will be something there.


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      • #18
        Second Chances glad that you're liking the book! Hopefully people enjoy the other things on the list too.


        My Homebrew Hub

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        • #19
          Golden Age of Piracy
          The Republic of Pirates: Being the True and Surprising Story of the Caribbean Pirates and the Man Who Brought Them Down

          One of my more favorite pirate books, it details what was going on in the Bahamas during the Golden Age.

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          • #20
            And to no one's surprise, I have more to add.

            1001 Nights

            The Early Hanafiyya and Kufa by Christopher Melchert: One of my pet peeves as a teacher with a background in Islamic History is when people talk about a monolithic "Sharia." Islamic law is diverse and complex, with various different Sunni and Shi'ite schools emerging in the Islamic Golden Age. This journal gives an overview of the formation of the Hanifi school of law, dwelling on its relations to the city of Kufa (definitely a place to be included in the era). This is primarily in contrast to the emergence of the Maliki school from Medina. More research into the legal schools of the Golden Age would be highly advised, it was a major aspect of this time period and has lots of fodder for both Vampires and Beasts.

            Ismailis in Azerbaijan by Seyyed Masoud Shahmoradi, et al: Azerbaijan is criminally underused in fiction, so it would be awesome to see it feature in this era. This specific article traces the history of the Ismailis in the region all the way to the time of the Ilkhanids. It is also written by a trio of Iranian scholars from Isfahan University, so it adds some diversity to your sources.



            Qing China

            From Alliance to Tutelage: A Historical Analysis of Manchu-Mongol Relations before the Qing Conquest by Nicola di Cosmo: Mongols make everything better unless you have to fight them. This paper examines the relations between the people who would be the Qing and the Mongols. While technically it falls before the era actually begins, it does make for a useful bit of backstory and it examines what would eventually become the Qing frontier.

            Visual Representations of the Body in Chinese Medical and Daoist Texts from the Song to the Qing Periods by Catherine Despeux: There should be some neat ideas in here to mine for the way that the Arisen contextualize Sekhem and their Descents in a Chinese setting. Daoist Hunter would also be awesome.

            Zhan Kai and Five "Novels of Women's Liberation" of the Late Qing by Ellen Widmer: Gender studies are always useful and this may give some insight into how perceptions of women were changing by the late Qing period. I'm not sure how Zhan Kai fits in with the greater cultural picture of the Qing, since I know very little about Chinese history, so cross-referencing this one with other sources to get a broader picture is probably a good idea.




            Light of the Sun

            The Science of Shakespeare by Dan Falk: An interesting look at the state of popular science at the end of the 1500s and the beginning of the 1600s. It specifically looks at Shakespeare's work, considering how he related to the Scientific Revolution, as well as why he as able to include so many scientific references within his plays.




            Golden Age of Science Fiction

            Inside Scientology: The Story of America's Most Secretive Religion by Janet Reitman: Scientology on proper is a bit late on the scene to be included in the Golden Age of Sci-Fi, but its founder L. Ron Hubbard is right in the thick of the Science Fiction boom at John Campbell's Astounding Science Fiction magazine, despite not having the same scientific credentials as Campbell's other writers. He was also fascinated by the occult and introduced other writers to it. Reitman's treatment gives some good insight into LRH's life, the way he looked at the world, and how he and his peers carried themselves. This is an excellent place to start for a fair treatment of Hubbard and Scientology on the whole. Reitman is honest and had access to both members and ex-members of the Church of Scientology, yet she neither is a part of the church nor has an axe to grind. The account is not exactly flattering... but it also is making an effort to just present the facts of history rather than tar and feather the Church.
            Last edited by Second Chances; 08-06-2017, 01:13 PM.


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            • #21
              We need a Dark Era about this:

              http://www.archaeology.org/news/5795...e-wolf-rituals


              LAND OF THE DAMNED: SPAIN (Spanish): Land of the Damned: Spain, Kingdoms of Blood: Spain; Cities of the Damned: Barcelona, Valencia, Carthian Constitution (1812), Three Arrows Pact:

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Uxas View Post
                Too bad it falls outside of the timeline for the Sundered World setting.



                Explore the Savage Age of Werewolf: the Apocalypse. Tribebook: Wlewa rivals to the Garou Nation.

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                • #23
                  Dear Magic Eight Ball - Will I ever run out of potential avenues of historical research?

                  Signs point to no.

                  General

                  Silk Roads or Steppe Roads? The Silk Roads in World Historyby David Christian: A history and analysis of cultural and economic exchange in Afro-Eurasia and how they expanded over time. Very useful.

                  1001 Nights

                  Avicenna and the Canon of Medicine: A Millenial Tribute by Richard Dean Smith: A quick biographical sketch of arguably the greatest philosopher, scientist, and medical practitioner of the Islamic Golden Age.

                  Cyclical Time & Ismaili Gnosis by Henry Corbin: A series of lectures on how Ismaili Shi'ism views both time and knowledge. Even though I only have the barest understanding of how it works and have only skimmed this book, it is widely referenced, and Corbin is one of the leading early academics on Ismaili studies. Would be very useful if, say, someone with an expansion tier were to add Mage to this era...

                  Islam: A Short History by Karen Armstrong: This is actually too broad of an overview for my personal tastes, but that's because I've very familiar with the subject matter and enjoy focusing in on details of how different states work and how culture evolves. This is a good read and an excellent starting place for anyone unfamiliar with the history of Islam.

                  Postal Systems in the Pre-Modern Islamic World by Adam J Silverstein: Hear me out. Communications are massively important in this time period and while it is unlikely that the Dark Era proper will go into detail as to how those communications systems work, the way that they impact the transmissions of stories across the Islamic world could be very important. This is a solid read and is much more interesting than it may appear at first glance. It's also the crux of one of my published papers, although that was on the Ilkhanate and is just barely outside of the scope of this timeframe.

                  Voices of Islam edited by Vincent J Cornell: A 5-part collection of essays that give an in-depth perspective on the various aspects of Islam and how the implications of the faith play out in everyday life. Highly Recommended.

                  Last edited by Second Chances; 08-12-2017, 03:54 PM.


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                  • #24
                    I found something for Golden Age of Sci-Fi!

                    The History of Science Fiction by Adam Roberts: Looks pretty interesting. Its a general overview of all of science-fiction's history, but it does focus one of its chapters specifically on the golden age, so it will probably be pretty useful.

                    The Time Machines: The Story of Science Fiction Pulp Magazines from the Beginning to 1950 by Mike Ashley: I'm linking to Google Books because this appears to be out of print on Amazon. Anyhow, there is some seriously useful and deep analysis here, if you can get your hands on a copy of it. EDIT: It appears you can still buy this direct from Liverpool University Press in ebook, paperback, or hardbound format.

                    I've also dug up some useful books for the backer created era, but I'm waiting for the reveal before I post them.
                    Last edited by Second Chances; 10-07-2017, 02:04 PM.


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                    • #25
                      Now that the expansion eras have been revealed, I have more resources to add!

                      Multiple Eras

                      General History of Africa: Once upon a time, UNESCO decided that the world was generally illiterate about Africa History. To combat that, they published a multi-part history series from Prehistory to 1984 (when it was published). This will be useful for Mali and Hawara.

                      Empire of Mali

                      Empires of Medieval West Africa
                      by David Conrad: A good review of the history and cultures of West Africa. There will likely be more detailed histories, but this is an excellent introduction.

                      Scandinavian Witch Trials

                      Beyond the Witch Trials edited by Owen Davis and Willem de Blecourt: Open access books are awesome, not the least because this book is free and legal! Anyhow, this collection covers witchcraft all over Europe, but there are a couple of papers that focus specifically on Finland and Sweden. They do an excellent job of explaining how witchcraft manifested in these regions, and how it was different than other locations Europe.


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                      • #26
                        While I should probably be working on other things right now, I stumbled upon two more interesting looking resources that I just had to share. I haven't read either of them yet, but they look worthwhile from the quick skim I did.

                        Male-Male Desire in Pharaonic Egypt by Alex Clayden: I'm not part of the LGBTQ community, but I have always found its history to be interesting. It is really nice to find historians who don't erase people who don't fit into a heteronormative worldview because some people are willing to go to ridiculous lengths to pretend that homosexuality, bisexuality, and people who are non-gender binary never existed before modern times. Also, this paper teaches you the hieroglyphics and words to say "how beautiful are thy buttocks!" in Middle/New Kingdom Egyptian, which I think is equal parts awesome and hilarious in an academic work.

                        The Arabic Ghoul and its Western Transformation by Ahmed al-Rawi: Given that 1001 Nights is going to be a Vampire era, I would say this is pretty much required reading, especially since it addresses the role of Ghuls in the One Thousand and One Arabian Nights directly.


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                        • #27
                          To all of no one's surprise, I've been reading more. Here's what I've found this time around.

                          1001 Nights

                          Dreaming in Christianity and Islamedited by Kelly Bulkeley, Kate Adams, and Patricia Davis: Interesting read. The authors are focused on finding common ground between Christianity and Islam through dreams, which seems like a godsend for an era that involves Beast. Includes an essay on Jinn doppelgangers that exist in dreams. Good stuff.

                          The Arabian Nights translated by Husain Haddawy: The most modern translation of the oldest text of the Arabian Nights that we have. Very easy and enjoyable to read. Haddawy makes a concerted effort to avoid the biases of earlier translations. Haddawy is an Iraqi born in Baghdad and thus a native Arabic speaker, which is an advantage that the European translators decidedly don’t have.

                          Sinbad and Other Stories from the Arabian Nights translated by Husain Haddawy: Also Haddaway. Still accessible and easy to read. This test includes later additions to the Arabian Nights like Sinbad, Ala ad-Din, and Ali Baba that don’t appear until after Europeans started adding to the Arabian Nights.

                          The Arabian Nights: A Companion by Robert Irwin: A very good read on the history and themes of the Arabian Nights. Even reading the first two chapters gave me a lot of insight into how the collection of stories has evolved over time. I think I get now why the era was originally listed as lasting to the modern day. The fact Irwin communicates this so clearly is pretty cool.



                          Necropolis of Hawara

                          The Political Situation in Egypt in the Second Intermediate Period by Kim Ryholt: This book seems to pretty much be the definitive text on the Second Intermediate Period during which the bulk of the Necropolis of Hawara era takes place. Most of this book is available on Google Books free to read and the chart on pg 6 is a very useful visual for untangling the complicated geopolitical relationship of the SIP dynasties, most of which were concurrent.

                          The Hyksos: A New Investigationby John Van Seters: Ironically, this book is now half a century old, so its title doesn’t exactly apply anymore, but this was one of the first studies of Hyksos dynasties to argue that they may have been present in Egypt prior to taking power rather than being external invaders.

                          Amenhotep III: Egypt’s Radiant Pharaoh by Arielle Kozloff: At the other end of the temporal spectrum, we have Amenhotep III, father of Akhenaten. This book is really engaging and interesting, but it is useful for another reason. Amenhotep III was actually born in Crocodilopolis and likely was raised in Hawara’s shadow. As a result, this book goes into detail about the culture of the royal family in the oasis, making it a trove of useful information for this era.
                          Last edited by Second Chances; 02-28-2018, 07:18 PM.


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                          • #28
                            Found today great site - Ancient.eu - that makes nicely readable in plain language articles on almost all historical topics. It's co-run with Oxford University.


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