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Looking for inspiration: Spirits

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  • Looking for inspiration: Spirits

    Whatever your character is a werewolf or a awakened shaman, dealing with spirits is a big part of their activities. As a GM, properly representing such an alien entity with a somewhat blueorange perspective may be difficult.
    Is there any novel or resource where I can look for "weird" spirits or similar beings communicating with mortals?

  • #2
    Princess Mononoke is great Shadow Realm ecology example movie. Here is why.

    Originally posted by wyrdhamster View Post
    As I'm preparing for running Shadow Realm in our game, I'm rewatching Princess Mononoke. It is official inspiration for Forsaken gameline on Spirits matters and I would like you to clear my understanding of examples in it. Here are my questions:

    1. Nago, giant boar attacking Ashitaka's village, is greater spirit ( probably Rank 4, on my eye ) in the flesh of very large boar, correct? So in Werewolf setting, after being slain in this flesh he will return to Shadow Realm, and appears once again after some time, yes?

    2. If yes Ashitaka really wouldn't kill him, Nago could posses next boar and attack villagers - this is why shamaness of settlement is begging dying Nago to not returning in his wrath, correct? Because she assumes he could return in vengeance?

    3. Nago is tainted by some corrupt force. I understand that in Werewolf game this would be effect of works from Malejins or Idigams, yes? They could twist the spirit in to something like this? In movie this is said that Wrath burned his body - so Boar Spirit in the beast was driven mad, get Influences of Wrath by some alien source ( probably Malejins ) and changed in to half mad demon, yes?

    4. If Ashitaka was "cursed" by spiritual poison - is this some kind of Numina, or maybe general power of Corrupted Spirits?

    5. Moro, Wolf Goddess, is giant she-wof from the same reasons as Nago - they are possesing normal animals for decades, even centuries, and let them grow bodies with they power, yes?

    6. Kodama are relative weak spirits of trees - so ther are like Rank 1 spirits.


    My stuff for Scion 2E, CoD Contagion, Dark Eras, VtR 2E, WtF 2E, MtAw 2E & BtP
    LGBT+ in CoD games

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    • #3
      The animism displayed in Dragon Age hits home pretty close to conceptual spirits as far as I've seen.

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      • #4
        I would like to suggest the Strangers as an example of the strange properties or behaviors a spirit may have. May be worth a read for those who enjoy surreal horror or supernatural bestiaries.


        Currently Playing: A large, mixed splat game of CofD. As: Nobody. I'm between characters and haven't been able to get a new concept to stick.

        And can you hear the choir sing? For pale blood satellites, to watch the end of everything, on this longest night.

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        • #5
          viskarenvisla's actual play The Seventh Seal is my go-to reference for evocative handling of spirits. And other werewolfy things. It's excellent and well worth the read for pure entertainment as well.

          --Khanwulf

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          • #6
            Wow Khanwulf thanks, I haven't been around for a while but I didn't see that. I have an interesting surprise though...

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            • #7
              I would suggest ye olde monster manual: The Classic of the Mountains & Seas. Its a book from the 4th century BC that describes supernatural beings, genius loci, mythical items and more. There are a lot of things that can be adapted to inspire spirits, rare talens and fetishes, etc. Since its about Chinese mythology, unless your players read a lot of xianxia, its unlikely they will know any of it, adding to the mystery of the Shadow.


              New experiences are the font of creativity, when seeking inspiration, break your routine.


              The Agathos Kai Sophos, an Acanthus Legacy of strategists

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              • #9
                And this is an example of a lower depth.

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