Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Question about cross-edition play...

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Question about cross-edition play...

    Forgive me if this has been answered somewhere, but I'm not seeing it.

    How well does cross-edition play work? Given the changes that happened as lines are updated to the second edition version of the core rules, are they compatible with the 1st ed stuff? For example, if I wanted say, a Demon (2nd edition rules) to show up in my Mage: the Awakening (1st edition rules) campaign, what sort of can of worms would I be opening mechanically?

    Thanks!

  • #2
    It wouldn't be that difficult. The biggest changes between the editions are felt within a gameline, not across gamelines; i.e. there are a lot of changes between Mage 1e and 2e, but there aren't too many barriers to putting a Demon in 1st edition.

    The major changes across all gamelines are experience point costs (flat rather than scaling), the way weapons work (weapon rating is added as automatic successes after a hit is determined, not added as a dice bonus), and the removal of derangements and introduction of conditions.

    Within games, the edition change plays a much larger role. For blue book, Integrity is substantially different from Morality, it no longer subscribes to Victorian era concepts of morality and mental stability, and instead is more of a way of tracking your mental fortitude. Mage has rather substantial reworkings of the Arcana, Paradox, Wisdom, Legacies, basically the whole game got a major overhaul (it's much better, I'd recommend checking it out).


    Mentats - a 2e Free Council Obrimos Legacy (Mind/Forces) built around being a human computer; Thaumatech Engineers - a 2e Free Council Obrimos Legacy (Matter/Prime) focusing on the creation of Imbued items and the enhancement of Sleeper technology

    Comment


    • #3
      I’d say the main thing to know is that pretty much everything is a fair bit stronger in second edition than in first. Not that crossover balance is a thing in the first place but the extra wrinkle added to that is still worth keeping an eye on.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Sith_Happens View Post
        I’d say the main thing to know is that pretty much everything is a fair bit stronger in second edition than in first. Not that crossover balance is a thing in the first place but the extra wrinkle added to that is still worth keeping an eye on.
        Also, when measuring characters out, the Beat system skews the XP curve. There are different arguments for the rough conversion rate, but I have usually compared one beat to one (1e) XP. (As a note, this makes low level items more expensive in 2e and 1e, comparatively, but they balance out and even get cheaper as you go up - iirc this almost always happens around 4 dots, where the relative cost is equal, except for Power Stat which happens at 3).

        Conditions are fairly easy to port over; however, without beats, there is far less incentive to intentionally take negative ones. Also make sure the npc from 2e doesn't trigger abilities off of conditions inflicted upon them. That may require more effort to customize properly

        Comment

        Working...
        X