Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Among the Pillars [Mummy/Hunter Dark Era/Shard Concept]

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Sorry. I was in a weird mood when I wrote that lol. Just ignore that post.


    “No one holds command over me. No man, no god, no Prince. Call your damn Hunt. We shall see who I drag screaming down to hell with me.” The last Ahrimane says this when Mithras calls a Blood Hunt against her. She/her.

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by Primordial newcomer View Post
      Question about the trader guild. Doesnt the Mesen Nebu already do that? They arent only alchemists in the traditional sense, but also stock brokers, having pretty much brought the concept of commerce into being
      While the Alchemists claim to have invented commerce, I think it means that they were the ones to invent the idea of "value", not "trading"- that is, value in an abstract concept, such as using a symbolic item (such as coins) in order to quantize the value of an object. Trade, after all, is something much older, as we see in Sundered World. At any case, there is some truth to the claim that the Mesen Nebu should control the trade in the Nameless Empire, but just as they are the ones to create weapons to the armies of Irem yet do not fight by themselves I do not see them as actually going out and doing the trade itself- like, they Irem's "National Bank/Treasury", using new concepts such as loans and debts, while the actual trade is done by the common merchants. In fact, it makes me think that a Trader Guild may serve as the Sister Guild of the Mesen Nebu, even though my initial idea is to make the Trader Guild into more of a "foreign influence", just like the Senu Jadet, with them being secretly a mystery cult dedicated to the "gods beyond the sea" (which are a reference to the Healers from my Dark Era, a.k.a Cheiron's Director Board in that very old Era).

      Penelope Oh, don't sweat about it! There is nothing to apologize. Trying to connect Mummy's version of Irem to the Akhud's is a subject which I too find as interesting, but it may indeed deserve its own thread.

      Anyway, when deciding how we should actually treat the setting, I've decided to look at some dates, and thakfully we have a few very well defined dates to work with- first, we know that the Rite of Return was performed exactly on 3832 BCE, being tied to the cycle of Sothis/Sirius. We also know that when Irem was 100 years old, it had the war with the Ki En Gir. Assuming that the fall of Irem had an impact over the whole region (which makes sense), we can see that around the same time was when Mesopotamia transitioned from the Ubaid period to the Uruk period, which is the Sumer we all know and love. However, it was only during the Uruk period that there are scientific evidence for connection between Mesopotamia and Egypt- which either means that the Rite of Return needs to be moved forward (which would clash with a lot of things)k, or that within the CofD universe, all of those artifacts actually come from an earlier period, only that something caused them to seem much younger, even though we would have to think about some reason why would could mess up with the scientific dating of those objects...

      Like, maybe, havibng a whole time breaking ritual which disrupted the internal time of those relics and infused them with Sekhem?

      Yeah, that makes sense.

      (it should also be mentioned that the accuracy of carbon dating during such earlier times is a bit inaccurate, so we are able to play around with the dates as we see fit, but still I think that saying "the Rite messed up time" is a cooler and already established element of the setting, IMO. Also, the internet seems to be unclear about when exactly did the Ubaid period ended, I see 3800 BCE at some cases and 4000 BCE at others, which again shows that things are not that easy to determine using technology, and if we add the Rite into the calculation it could undeed mess things up)

      Anyway, the corresponding culture to Sumer in Egypt should be the Gerzeh culture (or Naqada II), which was the one to trade with Mesopotamia. Well, either that or the Badarian culture, which was earlier, but while the Badirian did had trade with other nations there is no evidence they did reached Mesopotamia. Again, the Rite messes up with everything, but that is to be expected. So overall, I think that connecting Irem to the Naqada culture makes the most sense, with some events of the Naqada II period taking place earlier in the timeline yet the Rite of Return have distorted their internal timeline, or maybe have even "blew" those items through time, sending while ruinds and relics into the future by skipping a few hundreds of years, making them seem younger than they actually are.

      Alright- so it seems we have more or less managed to pinpoint Irem to some real life culture, so while a lot of this setting is indeed based around fiction (much like Sundered World), we at least have something to grasp on and can truly call this thing a Dark Era, which is nice.

      Well, I'm goinmg to eat something. More thoughts about Iremite culture will be in a later post.


      Check my STV content, Or My Homebrew

      "And all our knowledge is, Ourselves to know"- An Essay on Man

      I now blog in here

      Comment


      • #18
        So, here are some thoughrs about the social structure in the Empire-

        The rulling caste of the Empire is, of course, the Shan'iatu. Unlike any other caste, one can not become a Shan'iatu (well, with exceptions). Those are Irem's Guildmasters, sorcerer-priests which have created the Empire from the many scattered tribes of remet in the dying deserts of Egypt. They were the ones to teach the people of the Laws of Ma'at, educating the people so they could be judged- yet forming such terrible and impossible laws so that everyone will undoubtly fail their trial in Duat. They are not mere teachers, however- they are the pillars ofn civilization, and as such each represents a certain art of craft meant to shape Sekhem into form. As priests, they are the only ones allowed to pray to the gods, serving as the only channel to the divine, with them sometimes allowing chosen prayers of their servants to reach Heaven- for a price. While it is not an official truth, everyone in the Empire know that the Shan'iatu are not mortal beings, but the messengers of the gods themselves- again, with an exception. The master of the Oracles was once a mortal man, yet through constant gambles with the gods he managed to reach something akin for divinity. How and why it happened is unknown, but it may be a proof that through a mortal will, ascension is possible.

        Below the Shan'iatu is the King. The Empire, after all, requires a King- that was a concept that the Shan'iatu themselves created, and Sothis now shines as a testimony for their actions. As such, the King stands more as a symbol of the Empire than an actual ruler. Everything in Irem is managed by the Guilds, but they all pledge their loyalty to the King, claiming to serve him and act on his behalf, for the King represents Azar just as the Shan'iatu represent the Judges. And just like the god he represents, the King is required to ritually descent to the Underworld, to rule over the Empire's dead as he did over the living. And by "ritually" we mean a ritual sacrifice- for every year when Sothis shines in the sky the King gets butchered by the Shan'iatu, sending with him all of the prayers they deemed to be worthy, and then choose a new King to serve and his place. Unlike some more modern kings and more in the lines of the Guilds, the King of the Empire does not belong to a certain family- instead, it is an occupation. Children are being chosen and raised by the courts of the Empire in order top become the next King Candidates. From each generation, only the best and finest are chosen to become the next King. Those who are seen as having a potential may be kept as potential replacements in a case that the King would unexpectedly expire. Those who become too old or are deemed unfit for ruling are killed- or worse, become slaves. While rare, women do sometimes become King Candidates and even Kings, yet doing so requires the Candidate to sacrifice her original gender and be treated as the male rule of the Empire.

        While the King is the symbol of rulership in the Empire and the Shan'iatu are its founders and rulers, with the King being practically powerless and the Shan'iatu more busy with their hedonistic pleasure than actual work, the Guilds are the ones which take care of the Empire as whole. The Guilds are divided into two types, Major Guilds and Minor Guilds. The main difference in the Guilds is their function- the Minor Guilds are meant to support the Major Guilds, they are sanctioned by the Shan'iatu and are dedicated for cultivating Sekhem in their own way. The only exception, again, are the Oracles, which are a mortal organization which have somehow managed to gain a status equal to the rest of the Guilds. While all of the Guilds are important for the Empire's prosperity, they are not all equal-n the Minor Guilds are constantly seen as lesser crafts compared to the Major Guilds. That difference comes in the very language of the Empire- for the general use of the word "Guild" many times refer to the Major Guilds, while the Minor Guilds are always denoted as such.

        Each of the two groups of Guilds which are tied together in the form of four* couples. The Minor Guild is seen as the "sister" of the Major Guild, and is meant to support it and its craft, yet the relations are not one sided- the Major Guild is meant to guide and protect its sister, and members of the two Guilds commonly work together and share a common philosophy and understanding. In fact, the ties between a certain Guild and its sister are usually much stronger than the ones between two Major Guilds, for while all work for the benefit of the Shan'iatu they also compete with one another to gain their favor and show themselves worthy for their Guildmasters.

        Among the Major Guilds, the Taskmasters are the most feared. Working constantly with the slaves of the Empire, they shape the human resources into action, refining Sekhem from the sweat and blood of the slaves under their service. Constantly keeping their eyes open for any sign of rebellion or heresy, the Taskmasters report directly for the Shan'iatu for every crime they find among the masses, serving as the hidden hand of the Empire. Through their work, they have learned how to imbue their amulets as a physical sign of their authority, one born out of pain and fear. While their highest concern is supervising the slave population of the Empire, as a part of their role they have came upon many strange cults and heresies which worship all kinds of fiendish entities, giving them a lot of information about how to deal with demons and their like.

        While they are feared like the Taskmasters, the Undertakers are much more relatable for the people of the Empire. Unable to say their prayers to the gods, the Undertakers are seen as the closest thing the common decent person in the Empire would have for a priest. They tend the dead, prepare their bodies and craft wonders out of dead flesh. They are the ones to guarentee that the ones to die will be sent to Duat for their final judgement and won't get lost in the darkness as ghosts or other dead things. Their talents in necromancy allows them to calm the dead and protect the Empire from the horrors of the grave- or unleash those horrors upon their enemies. Their affinity to the dead allowed them to harvest the Sekhem generated from death and grief, shaping it to the form of uter- tools which immortalize the memory of the dead and make use of them, allowing them to still serve the Empire after their demise.

        Where the Undertakers work the dead and the Taskmasters the living, the Alchemists turn to manipulate the world itself. As the masters of change and transformation, the Alchemists are vital for the Empire's survival. They forge weapons for the Empire's legions, produce food and drink to feed the people and create many different potions and elixirs which could change the nature of the world. As part of their proferssion, the Alchemists are taught to not simply accept reality as is, but to also see the potential in everything, including in people. Due to their needs for rare reagents and their understanding of value, the Alchemists also supervise the trade in the Empire, creating a market where they use new concepts such as "price" and "debt" in order to manipulate the masses and maintain the Empire's control over its people. While they are able to form new materials out of common material, in order to create the greatest of regia they must turn to more... exotic realms of existence, ones which share their understanding of contracts, loans and debts, an act which requires dealing with the so called changelings.

        Finally, the last of the Major Guilds also deals with creation- yet one more subtle and otherworldly than the one the Alchemists require. The Scribes of the Empire work with texts, manipulating the written word in order to solidify ideas and immortalize thoughts, cultivating Sekhem from the human mind. For the Scribes, pure thought creates the purests ideals and forms the purests words, and as such they constantly work to make sure there will be no lies within the hymns, histories and prophecies they record. Their understanding of words and truth also extends into the realms of justice- for with the Shan'iatu unable to deal with every meager mortal crime, it falls upon the Scribes to judge the petty criminals of the Empire, making sure that the Empire would be clean of any sin and the minds of its people pure. However, there are times where some dark force corrupts the mind through fear and terror, disrupting the Scroll of Heavens and defiling the Sekhem. Those beasts may take the form of Duatic horrors, yet the Scribes know they are nothing but evil nightmares, which should be rightfully banished from the Empire.

        Tied to the Taskmasters, the Weavers are the masters of revealed power, much as their kin represent the hidden power of the Empire. Through their craft, the Weavers form cloths and carpents, tents and jewlery. Their goal in no mere efficiency, but true beauty- incorporating the symbols of power into the fabric and vestments of the owner. Through their craft, the Weavers have created the social ladder of the Empire, allowing all to recognize who is the King and who is the slave. Their services also extand to matchmaking, believing that it would allow them to maintain order within the Empire by reducing the chance of moving through the social classes, as well as preparing and taking care of the King, for he is the symbol of the Empire. Without priests, the most important ceremonies in the Empire are supervised by the Weavers, which fit the correct cloths for each event. As the governers of beauty and social harmony, anything which disrupts the natural order and corrupts the worlds draws the attention of the Weavers- such as those who practice with forbidden theurgy in order to create walking corpses of false life.

        Where the Undertakers deal with death, the Physicians deal with life. Instead o preserving the body and preparing the soul, the Physicians try to keep death at bay through strange medicines, treatments and devices called collectively as ankh. While considered as the most merciful among the Guilds, the Physicians are willing to sacrifice the few in order to save the many. They investigate the human body, trying to undertsnad what keeps it working in order to treat the dangerous plagues which could wipe out whole cities or wounds which coudl kill valuble servants- and discovery requires experimentation. Even then, the Physicians do their best to not be cruel, prefering to defile the dead over tormenting the living, something which is seen as on the verge of heresy in the Empire and is only allowed due to their common work with the Undertakers. Still, sometimes a living test subject is required, and the result of those experiments from time to time shocks the Physician which, due to their hubris, disrupted the balance of the five pillars of the soul, cracking it in the process and creating dangerous deviant horrors as a result.

        Working with the Alchemists of the Empire are the Architects, the ones who design the great monuments and idols which decorate the Empire. Where the Alchemists draw the world inside to transform a vessel, the Architects express the vessel outside in order to transform the world. They bring shape to the shapeless, and cultivate Sekhem from the resonance of sacred geometry in order to tune the mortal society to the will of Heavens. One of their greatest responsibilities is clothing the gods in flesh, making sure that wherever the Empire's people would go, they would see the faces of their gods and rulers, subjecting them to their will. Their effigies are said to embody the very concepts they sculpt, trapping Sekhem into form, and through the use of that sacred geometry they are able to control and influence the lower spirits and false gods of the world, which constantly whisper from the shadows in order to tempt the people to fall into improper worship.

        Like the Scribers, the Namers are too the masters of language- yet where the former focus on immortalizing the words of sages, the Namers delight in the temporary and personal experience. Through words, they bring meaning into the chaos, and compose complicated subjects into understandable concepts. By giving a name for everything, they enforce the personal over the eternal, and bind define the world around them. However, names are not simple words- they are visual, complicated arts. A true name, one as defined by Fate, is represented through all dimensions, and is understood through personal experience. The goal of the Namers, after all, is not simply assigning the primitive sounds of the human tongue to eternal concepts- it is to discover and express the true name of the object, as assigned by Fate itself. As such, the Namers sing and dance, think and paint, composing the truth into a medium in the most true way to create an instance called a seba. Due to their research of true names, the Namers are the ones which resonate the most with Fate, and as such have affinity to the strange movements of the stars and the horrors which come from them. That understanding was valuable during the war against the Ki En Gir, giving them the tools to find the witches of that land.

        *a subject for a change, with the Traders being potentially related to the Alchemists as their Minor Guild, and as such a different Minor Guild is required for the Architects, even though I like how it plays with the Tef Aabhi being presented as the "youngest" Guild of Irem- that is, they are the youngest one to join the Major Guilds, originally being a Minor one which rose to its place after the fall of Irem.

        While the Guilds are the backbone of the Empire's civilization, its rule is enforced through its powerful Legions. The warriors of the Empire are armed witht he finest of weaponary that the Guilds could craft, and relay mostly on the effoerts of the Alchemists in order to gain tools far more advanced than those of the other tribes and nations of the time. Guided by the Shan'iatu, the soldiers of the Empire have reaped one victory after the other, working as an unstoppable force which was challenged only by the Ki En Gir. For the warriors of the Empire, their only goal is to fight and die in the name of their masters, swearing fealty to the Shan'iatu themselves. That fealty, however, does not stop with their lives- after each battlefield, the Undertakers take the corpses of the fallen soldiers, giving them a special burial, one unlike the one desreved for the rest of the Empire. It is said to be a boon promised only for the finest of soldiers, and many seek service in the legions to have a promised afterlife away from the maw of the Devourer. While it may indeed grant their wishes, people should indeed be careful of what they wish for.

        While most of the Empire's social structure was established directly by the Shan'iatu, there is a level of personal freedom in the Empire- not much, but it is still there. It is not that the Shan'iatu care much about the human rights of their subjects- it is more that the Shan;iatu do not care enough, and the Guilds are indeed just mortals and can cotnrol everything. Here and there, cracks form, allowing certain organization to rise through foreign influences or simply from those people who simply could not find their place within the Empire and answer some need that the people need yet is left unanswered by the Guilds as whole. Those self proclaimed "Guilds" are rarely called as such by outsiders, who instead view them as cults or heresies. No decent person would belong to such an organization- but the truth is that those groups were founded by some indecent people in the first place, so it doesn't change by much.

        The largest of those False Guilds is the so called Oracles. While the taboo against prayer is enforced strongly in the Empire, the people still require some consultation- for even if they can't change the minds of the god, at the very least they can try and prepare themselves for the coming future. Made out of those people with the gift of vision (and those pretending to have such), the Oracles read the future through dice and straws and the organs of dead animals. Many use their gift of fortune telling for their own personal gain, or make dangerous bets by tilting the odds in their favor. As such, many of the Oracles are cheaters, liars and thieves, criminal which should be condemned by the Scribes- but they aren't. Their master, originally a mere mortal, have managed to win against the Shan'iatu themselves using a few very well educated gambles, and have been recognized as similar to them (or their equal, if the Oracles are to be believed). As such, the Oracles were sanctioned by the sorcerer-priests, even though the other, true Guilds would never accept them as their equals. Meanwhile, they do have their uses for the Empire, as their abilities as seers allow them to track down those people who were lost to the Law, their mind broken and slashed from despair.

        Like the Oracles, the Perfumers too have risen from the need for prayer. Yet where the Oracle turned to fortune telling and low sorcery, the Perfumers have found a much more primal and direct way to reach to the divine. Influenced by the practices of the conquered Canaan, the people of that land have practiced a form of sacred prostitution as a form of prayer, as the harlot express the divine in their flesh. As there is no direct prayer, the Perfumers do not technically break the taboo, yet the practice of visiting their temples of Nebthet are seen as improper (and as such, are done only in the late hours of the night). The Perfumers themselves, however, do more than a simple prostitution- they also tend the body and the soul, using large baths and oils to maintain hygiene and cosmetics in order to enhance their own beauty, cultivating Sekhem within their own bodies and incarnating the gods in their flesh through divine possession. When not in service, the Perfumers seek out the horrors born from wild Sekhem and foul sorcery and put them down, making their tracks using their special scents. While on the border of heresy, as the Perfumers hide their more esoteric aspects from the Empire the Shan'iatu see them as harmless way to fulfill the needs of the slaves. However, slaves being their most common practictioners means they also have the sympathy for those people- something which may turn out as a danger to the Empire.

        Also among the foreign influences on the Empire are the Traders. Made out of strangers which came beyond the sea, those people act as both diplomats and merchants which bring the Empire all kinds of exotic ingredients, spices and relics from far lands. While the trade is governed directly under the Alchemists, those foreigners have much interest in the new concepts which the Empire introduced to commerce, and werte quick to adapt to it. The Traders themselves allow an easy negotiation between nations for all kinds of merchandise, and seek to buy whatever the Empire has to offer- especially things which are related to the monsterous amkhata of the land. While they seem like regular human beings, many of the Traders hide within themselves the stolen organs of strange beasts, which were sewen into their body through an impossible medicine that even the Physicians can't understand. Some whisper that they are descended from creatures which are found outside of the Law, if not perhaps the experiments of the Keeper himself. The Shan'iatu, however, seem to be amused by their attempts at diplomacy which serves their ego, and as such allow the strangers to bind together and have their foothold in the Empire. Whether or not they would regret for it is yet to be known.

        NOTE- there are plans to add a False Guild of Blood Bathers which is focused around vampires and their like. I am yet to have a strong concept for them, but be aware that they will be added.

        While the False Guilds are condemnded by the Shan'iatu, its members are still one step above the lowest of all- the slaves. The vast majority of the Empire's population is made of slaves, which live and die as the Empire see fit. They exist in order to produce Sekhem and be taught the Laws in order they could be judged in Duat. Their pain and suffering serves the Empire, and they toil under the Guilds of the Empire in order to produce its famous relics and monuments. While it is easy to discard the slaves as incapable fools, if it was indeed the case than there would have been no need for the Taskmasters. There is power in numbers, after all, and without supervisions, many Heresies could grow among those desperate people.

        The most common of Heresies is found in the form of the barbarian Devouring Witches. Made out mostly of those tribes which live in the outskrits of the Empire or from those slaves which escaped it, the Witches believe that the Empire is an unnatural attempt to enforce twisted Laws upon the primalm lands. Their relics, monuments and arts are all exploitation of the world and its people, defiling the natural state of chaos with their crude "civilization". Those Witches constantly attack the Empire's forces and try to turn the slaves against them, yet they are too scattered to pose a true threat to the Empire's legions. Still, there is a reason that the Witches were not already wiped out by the Empire- for through foul magics from beyond the Law they have learned how to consume the Sekhem found in the relics of the Empire, imbuing they body with the stolen power while laying terrible curses upon their enemies. Even if they manage to kill the Witch, by the time it is alive it could devour vessels which required hundreds of lives in order cultivate, bringing the Empire years back in its schedule, and as such making their termination into the Empire's top priority.

        However, the Witches or not the only Heresy among the slaves- the Faithful of Shaddad are too a terrible religion, one which challenges the strongest taboo in the Empire- prayer. Brought to the brink of despair, some slaves dare to do the greatest sin in the Empire and pray for whatever force who is willing listen for slavation- and sometimes, something answers. They call it Shaddad, the Lost Judge and the Missing Pillar. They claim it to be a god, cast away by its siblings for they feared his power. Whether true or not, Shaddad is a cunning entity of demonic origin- in its whispers, he grant power to those who submit themselves to it, embodying itself in their flesh. By breaking the rules established by the Empire, Shaddad personally judges and punishes his Faithful, and through that castigation they are no longer subjects for the judgement of the cruel Judges. In their dreams, Shaddad promises the Faithful a safe Eden, allowed only for those who were judged by him, and as such cults dedicated for the entity grow and spread among the slaves. While the Faithful are careful with their worship, the Taskmasters do sometimes notice their illicit acts or find foul idols hidden in their huts. Those Faithful are sent to be judged by the Scribes and executed appropriatly- and commonly, the most loyal of those heretics laugh in the face of their judges. After all, their punishment was already given, and only paradise waits for them. However, one should not be that quick to trust the words of a demon.

        *****

        Ok, so this is what I have for now- but I still have some things which I need to work out and wish to add. Among those are the mentioned Blood Bather False Guild, as well as a number of False Guilds and.or Heresies and/or other social castes which corresponds to other immortals, just like how the Kher Minu are Eternals, the Wadjet Itja are Harvesters and the Decieved are Visitors, more or less. That means a Body Thief group, a Purified group and a Warden group (the Patchwork People are going to be related to the Traders). Perhaps the Perfumers are Body Thieves of some kind? It could work, but I'm not sure if it fits what I want it to be... On the other hand, we could tie the Body Thieves to King Candidates (which actually makes so much sense! I think I'll go with it). Also, the Reborn are going to be connected to the Faithful of Shaddad, in the form of my Avicii Sutra (as they are already a part of my Strains of the Cursed Blood project). Also, I consider adding a group of Tamers, which are about domesticating animals and plants with perhaps some interest in creating amkhata, and perhaps Actors, even though that acting is a Greek concept so we may need to ponder if it is appropriate or not (there is a reason they are not a part of the Namers, after all)- perhaps something with masks or something...

        Beyond that, I also consider having some representation of other "primitive" versions of different conspiracies. We already have Cheiron, the Lucifuge, VALKYRIE and the Faithful of Shulpae here, and the Alchemists do fulfil the niche for the Ascending Ones while the Undertakers work for the Council of Bones. The AKD, while being very appropriate in theory, are also redundant in here, as we have a LOT of groups focused around relics in all kinds of different ways (not to mention they are a bit busy with the whole Fall of Pangaea, as my head canon dictates). Maybe a group of those have came from beyond the sea in an attempt to steal the secrets of relic crafting, as a compensasion for their lost ability to make relics out of the hearts of the gods. That could work, maybe. The Cainte Heresy could be represented through the vampire killing blood bather group, and perhaps some aspects of the Hototogisu could be tied to the King Candidates as body theieves. The Knights of St George are probably present in some form in the Ki En Gir, but I ahve no idea what to do with the Knights of St Adrian, if something at all. The Les Mysteres are already present within the Perfumers, and the MM do not feel very appropriate for this Era, with the whole ban over prayer (but I am open for creative ideas). I do think that a group of dreamwalkers could be interesting to see, especially as slave children used by the Scribers, perhaps. VASCU may be somewhat tied to the Oracles, or not, I'm not sure. Finally, the Promethean Brotherhood are also not very appropriate for this Era, IMO- unmless we are going to tie them into a group of slasher sorcerers as a kind of cool Heresy. Yeah, that may actually be interesting.

        Oh- and of course, the Everlasting! I would really want to tie somehow the Everlasting in here. Probably some attempts by the local seers to replicate the powers of Shan'iatu in some way.

        Well, that's it. More in future posts, but please let me know what you are thinking on the current material and ideas.
        Last edited by LostLight; 10-05-2020, 07:11 PM.


        Check my STV content, Or My Homebrew

        "And all our knowledge is, Ourselves to know"- An Essay on Man

        I now blog in here

        Comment


        • #19
          So some followup thoughts-

          The more I think about it, the more I understand that anything which should be presented by the "actor" caste isn already offered by the Weavers, as from the Guild's point of view the cloths make the person, and as such by wearing other clothes they should transform into other people accordingly, especially as it reinforce their role in ceremonies as the ones to dress the "actors" and give them their role in society, and could indeed connect them more to the alchemists and promethean of the Era through the themes of spiritual transformation.

          The Tamers seem to be easy to connect to the Warden like immortals- as the masters of their territory it makes sense for them to help domesticate and tame all kinds of different lifeforms, and due to the fact that their efforts are essential for keeping the Empire fed it makes sense for them to be accepted as a False Guild, even though their tendency to create amkhata and the fact that they may well be composed of lower status members does put them on the verge of acceptence.

          Still kinda blocked with the False Blood Bather Guild. While I could easily present them as a Heresy, I do want to have them as a False Guild as their focus is around hunting vampires and their like... Maybe instead they could be presented as assassins of some kind? Like, Irem's assassin's guild. Not sure how it is appropriate to the Era, though, even though we have historical instances of blood bathers serving as sorcerer assassins of some kind... just some random thoughts.

          If we do establish a connection with whatever is left from the Sundered World's civilization from beyond the sea, I do start to like the idea of the AKD as foreign sorcerers who try to steal Irem's secrets of relic crafting. Could be an interesting plot hook, even though they do make sense more as an Heresy than some other organization.

          Considering the abyssal influence in the Ki En Gir, I do think that the primitive form of the KoSG would make a lot of sense for this Era. I have already used them for my Sundered World expansion, and it may be cool to have some abyssal cultists trying to ruin the plans of lowerdepthian cultists even if it is a "peace" now.

          Talking about Mesopotamia, the Everlasting as the product of stolen sorcery done by the Ki En Gir's seers and mages in an attermpt to mimic the actions of the Shan;iatu could indeed be cool. Like, we could think of it as being some sort of a nuclear arms race, with the seers reading the signs that the Rite is coming and as such work to create their own counteraction. Things wouls still blow up, of course, but it is still cool.

          Still wondering about a Purified group. In mean, I would like to see them, but I have no concept for them right now.

          Same for the KoSA and the MM. I try to think about some God Machine involvement in Irem (it would probably be against it, as it does not really seem to like the Lower Depths and whatever the Shan;iatu are doing is going to change the status que- not to mention that them going to Antarctica may draw its attention, as the former machine lies rotting there, consumed by Contagion), but I can't get any clear view of those. I kinda wanted to tie them to South Asia, yet the Indus Valley Civilization is far too young for this Era and as such any record of trade with the local settlements. On the other hand, we are talking about the idea that in the CofD, Irem reached Antarctica, so who knows?


          Check my STV content, Or My Homebrew

          "And all our knowledge is, Ourselves to know"- An Essay on Man

          I now blog in here

          Comment


          • #20
            Where did you get the part about the God-Machine rotting away in Antarctica?


            “No one holds command over me. No man, no god, no Prince. Call your damn Hunt. We shall see who I drag screaming down to hell with me.” The last Ahrimane says this when Mithras calls a Blood Hunt against her. She/her.

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by Penelope View Post
              Where did you get the part about the God-Machine rotting away in Antarctica?
              In the Contagion Chronicle, as might be inferred by the very next clause of that sentence being "consumed by the Contagion."


              Resident Lore-Hound
              Currently Consuming: Hunter: the Vigil 1e

              Comment


              • #22
                Okay. Never read that. I heard Contagion Chronicle isn’t official cause CoD doesn’t actually have a metaplot? So it might not be officially canon that the God-Machine is in Antarctica.
                Last edited by Penelope; 10-07-2020, 07:01 AM.


                “No one holds command over me. No man, no god, no Prince. Call your damn Hunt. We shall see who I drag screaming down to hell with me.” The last Ahrimane says this when Mithras calls a Blood Hunt against her. She/her.

                Comment


                • #23
                  LostLight but I mean if you’re doing your own campaign I guess it doesn’t matter if it’s official or not.


                  “No one holds command over me. No man, no god, no Prince. Call your damn Hunt. We shall see who I drag screaming down to hell with me.” The last Ahrimane says this when Mithras calls a Blood Hunt against her. She/her.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Penelope View Post
                    Okay. Never read that. I heard a rumor that book isn’t official?
                    There was a Kickstarter for it. The book has had its supplements on the Monday Meeting Notes for more than a year.


                    Resident Lore-Hound
                    Currently Consuming: Hunter: the Vigil 1e

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Satchel View Post
                      There was a Kickstarter for it. The book has had its supplements on the Monday Meeting Notes for more than a year.
                      Right. But it’s not officially canon cause the CoD doesn’t have a metaplot. So it’s like optional.

                      I mean, don’t get me wrong, I think it’s a good idea. Antarctica is as good a place as any to put the God-Machine. I’m just trying to clarify whether it’s really official that a Contagion has hit the CoD universe or whether it’s like an alternate history kinda thing.


                      “No one holds command over me. No man, no god, no Prince. Call your damn Hunt. We shall see who I drag screaming down to hell with me.” The last Ahrimane says this when Mithras calls a Blood Hunt against her. She/her.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        The Contagion is as official for the CofD as much as Vampire: the Requiem is official for Werewolf: the Forsaken or Mage: the Awakening is to Hunter. That is, no other gameline would require you to use it, but you may find references for it across different gamelines. The sample settings presented there are as official as the settings of any other gameline. I hope it answers your question.

                        Also, canon is not the same as metaplot. The CofD generally do not have a metaplot, but it does has a canon. Some canon is more optional than the others, but the Antarctica setting for the Contagion is as canon as the Antarctica setting for Mummy. Or Promethean, on that matter.
                        Last edited by LostLight; 10-07-2020, 07:44 AM.


                        Check my STV content, Or My Homebrew

                        "And all our knowledge is, Ourselves to know"- An Essay on Man

                        I now blog in here

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Penelope View Post
                          Right. But it’s not officially canon cause the CoD doesn’t have a metaplot. So it’s like optional.

                          I mean, don’t get me wrong, I think it’s a good idea. Antarctica is as good a place as any to put the God-Machine. I’m just trying to clarify whether it’s really official that a Contagion has hit the CoD universe or whether it’s like an alternate history kinda thing.
                          A metaplot is an 'overarching storyline that binds together events in the official continuity of a published role-playing game setting.' Chronicles doesn't follow the adventures of a few special NPCs who change the world and thus justify new books depending on their actions.

                          The Contagion is just setting. It exists as you want it to exist, like vampires, or a secret base on the moon.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            LostLight, nofather thank you guys. Now I get it.


                            “No one holds command over me. No man, no god, no Prince. Call your damn Hunt. We shall see who I drag screaming down to hell with me.” The last Ahrimane says this when Mithras calls a Blood Hunt against her. She/her.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              So one thing I'd like to say about the Legions, because I will guess they're supposed to be TFV.

                              Ancient war was very different from the type of operations TFV recruits from. Ancient armies fought in massed formations to keep some elements of control during battle. They would often live off the local land, since logistics as we understand wouldn't come into being until roughly the Napoleonic Era. While ancient warrior elites would be comparable to what TFV prefers to recruit from, the Legions of Irem would still be an ultimate blunt instrument, not well suited to the small-scal rigors of the Vigil without eyes on the ground or splitting parts of the Legions into small cadres.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X