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Crossover Resource: Gimmes and Gotchas by Splat

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  • Crossover Resource: Gimmes and Gotchas by Splat

    Inspired by some of the discussion in the Power Tiers in 2E thread, I'd like to compile a resource to aid in crossovers between the different nWoD/CofD lines. Ideally, I'd like a list of mechanics/traits for each gameline that aren't necessarily obvious at first glance that are useful for STs to know when running crossover games (or running a game with a line they're not as familiar with). I am NOT looking for power tiers, or reasons why one splat is the best/worst. I'm also not looking for minority mechanics (one Contract line, one Discipline line, one set of Gifts, etc.). I'd like these things to be traits that all (or nearly-all) the supernaturals of this type display (vampires burn in the sun, mages need a lot of prep, mummies lose power over time, etc.). Yes, someone could get all this information by reading through the book in question, but I want to build a cheat-sheet/starting point to make things easier and immediately clear.

    With permission and credit, I'd like to edit this post with what other folks come up with, so that it can be used as a resource in the future without someone having to trawl through the entire thread. I'd rather only cover splats whose books have been finalized at this point; speculation is great, but not practical.

    Here's what I have so far:

    Baseline assumptions for all splats (true unless stated otherwise)
    • They can pass as human without much effort.
    • They have a power stat that grows over time/age/XP.
    • Their powers are discrete, specific, and must be bought in low-to-high sequence.
    • Fuel for their powers is difficult to gather.
    • They can spend fuel to heal damage.
    • They can identify each other on sight.
    • They cannot procreate with humans.
    • They are otherwise identical to humans, in terms of consumption/healing/organization/aspirations/morality/etc.
    Changeling (1ed)
    • I Can Do This All Day: Changeling fuel (Glamour) is pretty easy to gather: anytime anyone has an emotion, a Changeling can roll to gather power. This includes humans, as well as non-Changeling supernaturals, and is not the only way they can gather it. Their powers also have Catches, circumstances where they can use their magic cost-free.
    • Pledged to Power (Pledges): Changelings can make mystically-binding promises between themselves and others, called Pledges. These promises have to involve a set of Tasks for the parties to complete, Sanctions if someone fails, Boons (including Merits and Skill bonuses) as a reward for doing things, and a Duration of how long the promise lasts. They can make Pledges with anyone, including normal humans and other supernaturals.
    • Squishy: Changelings cannot spend fuel to heal damage.
    • Road to Nowhere: Changelings can create doors to the Hedge, a border-world between reality and Arcadia, by spending fuel and touching a door or portal. They can also open doors from the Hedge back to Reality the same way.
    • Metal > Magic: Cold Iron will ignore Changeling magic.
    • Maybe Babies: The majority of Changelings cannot procreate, but a few (by dint of luck, effort, and magic) can.
    • Kidnapping is Worse Than Murder (Clarity): Changelings' Integrity-equivalent (Clarity) includes using magic in front of humans and major life changes as a breaking point, considers imprisonment worse than murder, and ranks killing humans worse than killing Changelings. Changelings with low Clarity begin to hallucinate; a Changeling with zero Clarity becomes unable to tell reality from fiction, and is unplayable.
    Vampires (2ed)
    • Nocturnal: With a few specific exceptions, Vampires must sleep during the day and are active at night. If they are woken up during the day, they suffer penalties for remaining active, an suffer serious, potentially fatal harm from sunlight.
    • Bloodsucker: Vampires gain heir supernatural fuel source (Vitae) by drinking the blood of the living. For most vampires, this means specifically fresh human blood, but young vampires may be sustained by animals and very old vampires require the blood of other supernatural creatures, most often other vampires. This replaces their need for food. Vampires must spend one Vitae per night to wake up.
    • Bloodhound (Kindred Senses): Vampires have an uncanny ability to hunt for blood. They can smell blood from great distances, hear heartbeats without aid, and spot even tiny traces of blood within their field of vision.
    • Who Needs Organs?: As undead creatures, Vampires don't need most of their body to function. They reduce damage from most nonmagical sources of harm from lethal to bashing or from aggravated to lethal.
    • Kill It With Fire: Fire causes aggravated damage to Vampires.
    • A Stake of Holly Through His Heart: Piercing a Vampire's heart with a wooden object incapacitates the Vampire until the object is removed.
    • Good as New: Vampire will automatically spend Vitae to heal damage when they fall unconscious or sleep, as well as healing superficial signs injury such as scars and burns, cosmetic changes such as tattoos and piercings, and even signs of aging.
    • Get Pumped (Physical Intensity): Vampires can spend fuel to gain a temporary boost of strength or speed, adding dice to physical dice pools.
    • Let Me Freshen Up a Bit (Blush of Life): Vampires look dead. They can spend fuel to temporarily mimic living human body functions like a beating heart, working lungs, and a functioning digestive system. Under these conditions they can pass as humans by any mundane examination.
    • The Devil Made Me Do It (Frenzy): Vampires are prone to loss of control. Hunger, anger, fear, and other extreme emotional states can cause them to enter a berserk state known as Frenzy, where they become significantly stronger and tougher, but lose most of their capacity for complex or rational thought. Some especially reckless Vampires intentionally drive themselves to Frenzy to accomplish their immediate goals.
    • Takes One to Know One (Predatory Aura): At Storyteller discretion, Vampires may recognize other supernatural creatures with a perceptible aura or signature by sight, though unless they have prior experience with creatures of the same type, they likely won't know what they're sensing, only that it's supernatural and it's not a Vampire. Additionally, a Vampire can reveal a bit of its true nature to another character - just enough to let them know there's an alpha predator among them. This triggers Fight or Flight instincts, and brings out the worst in anyone unfortunate enough to be the target of it. Creatures with auras of their own can push back and try to turn this power around on the vampire.
    • Thicker than Water (Blood Sympathy): Vampires can sense the general condition and whereabouts of other members of their bloodline. The further removed, the weaker this sense is, but those a generation or two removed can often find each other very easily, especially when their relatives are in danger.
    • No Sweeter Nectar (Blood Bond): The blood of Vampires is powerfully addictive, and drinking it can bind one to the will of the Vampire to whom it belongs. The more Vampire blood a character drinks, the stronger the vampire's sway over the character. After three draughts, most mortals practically become the vampire's slave. Creatures with Supernatural Tolerance traits have an easier time resisting the influence of these blood bonds, but there is always a risk.
    • Inhumanity to Man (Humanity): Vampires' Integrity-equivalent (Humanity) has inhuman acts as breaking points. The lower Humanity, the harder it is for a Vampire to pass as human. Vampires at low Harmony may take Banes to become immune to some breaking points. A Vampire at 0 Humanity is a complete monster (draugr), and becomes unplayable.
    Vampire (1ed): As 2ed, exceptions below
    • Let's You and Him Fight (Predator's Taint): When meeting another Vampire for the first time, Vampires instinctively react, and may fall victim to anger or fear frenzy.
    • Remove Bloodhound, Takes One to Know One
    • Edit Who Needs Organs?: Vampires take lethal damage from blades.
    • Edit No Sweeter Nectar (Blood Bonds): Does not work on supernaturals.
    Mage (1ed)
    • So Many Choices: Mage powers (Arcana) allow for flexible powers, and are treated as broad areas of influence, rather than specific powers.
    • So Little Time: More powerful abilities take time (longer than turns) to prepare. Some require a tie to a targetted person (a relationship, a symbolic link, or physical nearness) to work.
    • Reality Ensues (Paradox): When Mages use obvious powers, or repeatedly use powers, there is an increasing chance they will be punished by reality (Paradox). Mages can choose to take this punishment as resistant damage, or they can let loose, affecting their spells or the area negatively.
    • Blood For Mana (Scouring): Mages can damage themselves or their traits for fuel (Mana).
    • Sniff, Sniff: Mages can sense other supernaturals nearby, including non-Mages, that are not making an effort to hide. They can't pinpoint the position of others, only know that they are near.
    • Committed to Sparklemotion (Nimbus): Mages can reveal their magical aura, which can give small bonuses to social rolls based on the Mage's magical temperament. However, this aura can be revealed inadvertently when the Mage fulfills a Virtue or Vice, outing them as supernatural.
    • Far Out: Mages can visit the Astral Plane via meditation.
    • Fancy Words (High Speech): Mages can learn High Speech, a language directly tied to magic, in order to improve their spells.
    • Hubris is Worse Than Murder (Wisdom): Mages' Integrity-equivalent (Wisdom) drops when using unnecessary magic, as well as for manipulation of other souls. Mages who drop to 0 Wisdom become utterly self-serving and mad.
    Promethean (1ed)
    • Kill It With Fire: Prometheans take aggravated damage from fire, rather than lethal.
    • Nobody Likes You (Disquiet): Humans, and human-like supernaturals, are magically predisposed to dislike Prometheans.
    • Like a Bad Penny (Superlative Endurance): All Prometheans can return from the dead, at the cost of their power stat (Azoth). They suffer no wound penalties and cannot fall unconscious.
    • Pump Up the Jam (Electroshock Therapy): Prometheans can heal grievous injuries in little time by finding a source of electricity and draining it into their body.
    • Unlimited Energy: Prometheans regain one fuel (Pyros) every day at the rising of the sun.
    • Inhuman Attributes (Transhuman Potential): Prometheans can use Pyros to boost any attribute for a single action.
    • Everything is Edible (Superlative Constitution): Prometheans can sleep every other day, and any organic substance can sate their hunger (including roadkill and ethanol).
    • Home Is Where I Am Not (Wasteland): Prometheans staying in a single place for too long will corrupt the very world by their existence.
    • You Made Me Do It! (Torment): Prometheans are prone to destructive outbursts of emotions called Torment when their very nature causes them too many problems.
    • Dramatic Lightning (Disfigurement): Using any of their powers reveals the true nature of the Promethean for a fraction of a second.
    • Like Calls to Like: In addition to recognizing other Prometheans by sight, Prometheans can sense the presence of their kin in their vicinity. They can't pinpoint the position of others, only know that they are near.
    • More Than the Sum of Our Parts (Alchemical Pacts): Prometheans can create alchemical pacts between themselves to control the various drawbacks of their existence.
    • Sequence Breaking: Promethean magic is in sets of low-to-high, but they can buy powers out of sequence.
    • Maybe Babies: The majority of Prometheans cannot procreate, but a few (by dint of luck, effort, and magic) can.
    • Inhumanity to Man (Humanity): Prometheans' Integrity-equivalent (Humanity) has inhuman acts as breaking points.
    Werewolf (2e)
    • Only a Flesh Wound (Regeneration): Werewolves passively heal damage very quickly. Each round, they heal one bashing. Lethal heals one every 15 minutes. Aggravated heals one every 4 days.
    • Clap For the Wolfman (Shapeshifting): Werewolves can change into five different forms, sometimes requiring fuel (Essence). These forms each have different benefits, though all get some added perceptive abilities.
      • Human (Hishu): Bonus to hiding.
      • Near-Human (Dalu): Increased Size, physical buffs, use Defense against Firearms, bite and claw attacks, can separate target from crowd, causes Lunacy (below).
      • Wolfman (Gauru): Heal all lethal and bashing damage each turn, increased Size, physical buffs, use Defense against Firearms, bite and claw attacks, increased Initiative, causes Lunacy (below). Can only stay in this form for a limited time, must attack/destroy each round or risk Death Rage (below).
      • Dire Wolf (Urshul): Increased Size, increased Speed, physical buffs, use Defense against Firearms, bite and claw attacks, can cause physical Tilts when attacking, causes Lunacy (below).
      • Wolf (Urhan): Increased speed, decreased Size, physical buffs, bite attack, can grapple on successful attack, can spend fuel to preempt opponent's attack.
    • You Won't Like Me When I'm Angry (Death Rage): When badly injured, enraged, or after spending too long in Gauru form, Werewolves enter Death rage. They stay Gauru form for the scene. They have no control over their actions, and will destroy everything around them, except other werewolves in Death Rage.
    • What Big Eyes You Have (Wolf Senses): Werewolves have supernaturally good hearing, smelling, and sight, and are not penalized if one sense is deprived. They can see into Twilight and into Shadow. They can track someone who's blood they've recently tasted, and can roll their Power Trait (Primal Urge) to identify someone they've met before, regardless of circumstance.
    • What Big Teeth You Have: Werewolves can attempt to eat others, causing aggravated damage and replenishing their fuel.
    • Road to Nowhere (Step Sideways): Werewolves can enter and Shadow at locii by rolling based on their Integrity-alternate (Harmony). At high Harmony, they can leave Shadow anywhere; at low Harmony, they can enter Shadow anywhere.
    • Scary Mothers (Lunacy): When seen in forms other than completely human or completely wolf, or when seen healing or doing magic, Werewolves cause human viewers to black out the memory, unless they exceptionally succeed. Dramatic failures cause viewers to become a minor Werewolf template (Wolf-Blooded).
    • Betrayed By the Shiny (Luna's Curse): Werewolves take lethal instead of aggravated damage from most sources. Werewolves take aggravated damage from weapons made of silver.
    • Words of Wolves (First Tongue): All Werewolves know the language of spirits (First Tongue). They use this for most of their terminology (e.g. Shadow is called Hisil).
    • Walking the Tightrope (Harmony): Werewolves' Integrity-equivalent (Harmony) is a sliding scale, with lower levels being more spirit-like, and higher levels being more human-like. Werewolves can get Breaking Points in either direction; being at 0 or 10 does not make them unplayable, though it may prevent them from entering/leaving Shadow.
    Demon
    • A Form You're Comfortable With: Demons can have multiple human appearances. They can shift between them by spending fuel (Aether) when unobserved.
    • Robots In Disguise (Demon Form): A Demon's true form is obviously inhuman, but may have a variety of strengths and abilities. Demons can transform into it for free, but must spend fuel (Aether) to appear human again.
    • It's a Really Good Disguise (Spoofing): Even when targeted by detecting powers, Demons have a chance to pass as human, rather than supernatural. Many of their powers are similarly undetectable. While in Cover, they use that trait, rather than their power trait, as their Supernatural Tolerance.
    • Boom, Baby! (Going Loud): Demons can destroy a Cover when shifting to Demon form to get a large, temporary boost in power.
    • Buggy (Glitches): When using their true form, or their more potent powers, Demons may develop obvious supernatural tells, with duration from a scene to indefinite.
    • Devil's Bargain (Pacts): Demons can make mystically-binding promises between themselves and non-Demons, called Pacts. These generally involve the Demon taking part of the pactee's past, and the pactee getting a Merit. Some Pacts, called Soul Pacts, let the Demon replace the pactee in reality, removing the person and creating a new Cover for the Demon.
    • Flattened Magic: Demons have two kinds of magic: Embeds and Exploits. Any Demon can buy any Embed. Exploits require a related Embed to be bought first, but there is not a strict hierarchy.
    • Let's Get It On: Demons can procreate with humans, and other Demons, while in Cover.
    • Of Course I Know Science, I'm a Scientist (Legend): Demons can temporary gain Skills, Specialties, and Merits, if they lack them but their Cover should have them.
    • Ultimate Polyglot: Demons can speak every language with a native speaker.
    • Act Natural (Cover): Demons' Integrity-equivalent (Cover) varies by human appearance. Each human appearance has its own Cover rating. They suffer Breaking Points when acting out of character or using certain powers, but only for that appearance. Cover can be increased by acting in-character, or by fusing other pasts/souls into it. A human appearance that drops to 0 Cover is destroyed. A Demon with no human appearances must stay in their true form.
    Hunter (1e)
    • Not That Magical: Hunters lack a Supernatural Tolerance trait. Their powers are bought via Merit dots, and they may not have any supernatural powers at all.
    • Let's Get It On: Hunters can procreate with humans, and other Hunters.
    • Morality is Relative: Hunters use Integrity (or Morality) as humans. However, they can swap Breaking Points/Sins through play.
    Geist
    • Naming Conventions? Naaaaaah!: "Sin-Eater" is how individuals of this line refer to themselves. "Geist" is the being that animates them.
    • Like a Bad Penny: All Sin-Eaters can return from the dead, at the cost of their Integrity-equivalent (Synergy).
    • Only a Flesh Wound: Sin-Eaters can spend fuel (Plasm) to make any damage "phantom" (and is obviously magical when doing so). This damage is overwritten, rather than pushed out, if more damage is taken. If phantom damage remains at the end of a scene, it becomes bashing.
    • Deep Pools: Sin-Eaters are very limited in how they get fuel, but have bigger pools than other supernaturals.
    • Spoopy: Sin-Eaters can see into and affect Twilight by possessing their Geist. They can always see ghosts.
    • Signature Item (Keystone): Sin-Eaters are tied to a ghostly object that they can summon at will, usually related to their death or Geist.
    • Linear Fighters, Quadratic Wizards (Keys/Manifestations): Sin-Eater powers work by the combination of Keys (areas of influence) and Manifestations (what you can do with your influence). Manifestations are ranked, while Keys are equal in cost. These effects tend to be subtle.
    • I See Dead People (Morbid Reality): Sin-Eaters can see how close to death someone is. They can also spot the "otherwise-alive," such as vampires. They can tell where death happened, and can roll for more information. Sin-Eaters can speak to and understand ghosts, no matter what language the ghost speaks.
    • Road to Nowhere: Sin-Eaters can open Avernian Gates to the Underworld with fuel.
    • When Goals Align (Synergy): Sin-Eaters' Integrity-equivalent (Synergy) measures how aligned they are with their Geists' goals. Breaking Points include destruction/desecration of ghosts, Geists, and related objects. A Sin-Eater at 0 Synergy is constantly fighting for control of their body against the Geist, and becomes unplayable.
    Beast
    • Eyes Bigger Than Your Stomach (Satiety): Beasts' fuel and Integrity-equivalent are the same trait (Satiety).
    • Extremophile (Environmental Immunity): Beasts have innate immunity to at least two classes of Environmental Tilt, based on their power stat (Lair). These depend on the Traits of a Beast's Lair.
    • I'm In My Element (Lair Resonance): If a Lair Trait is present in the area, Beasts can cause their other Lair Traits to come into affect, as well as change the cost of their magic (Atavisms) to cost Willpower instead of fuel (Satiety).
    • That Reminds Me (Chamber Resonance): Beasts can visit their Lair at locations conceptually similar to areas within it. They can link different areas to travel between them, as well as merge with their monsterous self (Horror) while within. Merged with their Horror, a Beast is massively powerful and can heal quickly.
    • Seven Years Bad Luck: Damage a Beast's Horror suffers does not transfer to the Beast, but any wound penalties do. Merging causes the damage to combine. Beasts die if their Horror is killed or if their Lair is collapsed.
    • Sympathy For The Devil (Kinship): Beasts have an affinity for the supernatural as a whole, allowing them to metaphysically connect other monsters to them through sustained interaction that makes it easier for them and their "family" to help each other. A connected, nearby supernatural can use the Beast's Resistance Attributes instead of their own for the purposes of resisting hostile magic.
    • Bloody Mary (Mother's Kiss): Beasts can supercharge the paranormal qualities of supernatural beings by bleeding and speaking the target's name, providing bonus dice to rolled powers and narrative boosts to other magical traits.
    • I Learned It From Watching You (Passing Resemblance/Kinship Nightmares): Beasts can superficially mimic the basic category of supernatural beings they have ties with, and can develop new powers (Nightmares) based on the fears related to those beings.
    • Let's Get It On: Bests can procreate with humans, and other Bests.
    Last edited by AceOfAlmonds; 01-29-2016, 01:38 PM.

  • #2
    Guess you're trying to develop some metrics for the effectiveness of certain splats?

    Covertness, Flexibility, Sustainability, are the three your post brings to mind. Could also possibly add "Power" as well as to the metric, for regarding straight combat ability.

    Comment


    • #3
      Not effectiveness, no. With the way things are written, there are examples of any given supernatural that will excel at any given task. You can stat a combat/stealth/social/jack-of-trades monster in any system. I'm looking for the things one splat has that may throw off an ST, things that are important to take into account, like Changelings being able to gather power easily, or Demons being able to fake being human, or Promethiens having get-out-of-dead-free cards, or Hunters not having a power stat. I'll try writing up some more, but I don't know the ins and outs of every system, hence this thread to try and crowd-source it.

      Comment


      • #4
        Maybe creating a set of baseline assumptions will help. Assume all splats work as follows:
        • They can pass as human without much effort.
        • They have a power stat that grows over time/age/XP.
        • Their powers are discrete, specific, and must be bought in low-to-high sequence.
        • Fuel for their powers is difficult to gather.
        • They can identify each other on sight.
        • They are otherwise identical to humans, in terms of consumption/healing/organization/aspirations/morality/etc.
        I'll edit my first post to reflect this baseline; anything under a given line will be where there are exceptions.

        Comment


        • #5
          Vampires (2ed)
          • Nocturnal: With a few specific exceptions, vampires generally sleep during the day and are active at night. If they are woken up during the day, they suffer penalties for remaining active, an suffer serious, potentially fatal harm from sunlight.
          • Bloodsucker: Vampires gain Vitae (their supernatural fuel source) by drinking the blood of the living. For most vampires, this means specifically fresh human blood, but young vampires may be sustained by animals and very old vampires require the blood of other supernatural creatures, most often other vampires.
          • Bloodhound: Vampires have an uncanny ability to hunt for blood. They can smell blood from great distances, hear heartbeats without aid, and spot even tiny traces of blood within their field of vision.
          • Who Needs Organs? As undead creatures, vampires don't need most of their body to function. They reduce damage from most nonmagical sources of harm from lethal to bashing or from aggravated to lethal.
          • Kill it with Fire: Fire causes aggravated damage to vampires.
          • A Stake of Holly Through His Heart: Piercing a vampire's heart with a wooden object incapacitates the vampire until the object is removed. Most vampires tend to be very angry when they regain consciousness, so it's often best to bury or torch a staked vampire rather than risk letting it get back up.
          • Good as New: Vampires can spend Vitae to heal themselves. More serious injuries require more Vitae to heal. This healing needs to be activated intentionally while they are conscious, but happens automatically when they sleep, and even heals superficial signs injury such as scars and burns, cosmetic changes such as tattoos and piercings, and even signs of aging.
          • Get Pumped: Vampires can spend Vitae to gain a temporary boost of strength or speed, adding dice to physical dice pools.
          • Let Me Freshen Up a Bit: Vampires can spend Vitae to temporarily mimic living human body functions like a beating heart, working lungs, and a functioning digestive system. Under these conditions they can pass as humans by any mundane examination.
          • The Devil Made Me Do It: Vampires are prone to loss of control. Hunger, anger, fear, and other extreme emotional states can cause them to enter a berserk state known as Frenzy, where they become significantly stronger and tougher, but lose most of their capacity for complex or rational thought. . Some especially reckless vampires intentionally drive themselves to Frenzy to accomplish their immediate goals.
          • Takes One to Know One: Vampires instinctively recognize each other upon observing another of their kind with any of their senses. At Storyteller discretion, this ability may extend to recognizing other supernatural creatures with a perceptible aura or signature, though unless they have prior experience with creatures of the same type, they likely won't know what they're sensing, only that it's supernatural and it's not a vampire. Additionally, a vampire can reveal a bit of its true nature to another character - just enough to let them know there's an alpha predator among them. This triggers Fight or Flight instincts, and brings out the worst in anyone unfortunate enough to be the target of it. Creatures with auras of their own can push back and try to turn this power around on the vampire.
          • Thicker than Water: Vampires can sense the general condition and whereabouts of other members of their bloodline. The further removed, the weaker this sense is, but those a generation or two removed can often find each other very easily, especially when their relatives are in danger.
          • No Sweeter Nectar The blood of vampires is powerfully addictive, and drinking it can bind one to the will of the Vampire to whom it belongs. The more vampire blood a character drinks, the stronger the vampire's sway over the character. After three draughts, most mortals practically become the vampire's slave. Creatures with Supernatural Tolerance traits have an easier time resisting the influence of these blood bonds, but there is always a risk.
          EDIT: I wrote this post before you laid down the baseline assumptions, so some of these points may be less relevant. But I figured I might as well list all of the base template abilities.
          Last edited by Charlaquin; 01-22-2016, 12:23 AM.


          Going by Willow now, or Wil for short. She/Her/Hers.

          Comment


          • #6
            Mage (1ed)
            • So many choices: Mage powers (Arcana) allow for flexible powers, and are treated as broad areas of influence, rather than specific powers.
            • So little time: Except for a few practiced abilities, most Mage powers take a lot of time to prepare.
            I'm not sure if I agree with So little time. While lot of preparation time can give you most powerful versions of your effects, you are capable of casting their basic versions in instant time without problems. While you need Ritual Casting to do some goofy and cheesy things, you absolutely don't need ritual casting to stay relevant. The way you phrase it is misleading; mage gains a lot by having preptime, but *doesn't lose much* by not having it. Difference between Ritual Caster and Instant Caster is not ability to create certain effects, but their scale; Instant Caster can turn YOU into snowman, Ritual Caster can turn WHOLE CITY into snowmans. In general, ritual casting produces a lot of weird results that are more like bugs and system artifacts than features.
            So instead of "powers need preparation time", "powers scale with preparation time exponentially".

            Comment


            • #7
              Promethean (1st)
              • Pump up the jam: Prometheans can heal grievous injuries in little time by finding a source of electricity and draining it into their body.
              • Inhuman Attributes: Prometheans can use Pyros to boost any attribute for a single action
              • Unlimited Energy: Prometheans regain Pyros every day at the rising of the sun
              • Unstoppable: Prometheans suffer no wound penalties and cannot fall unconscious. They can sleep every other day, and any organic substance can sate their hunger (including roadkills and Ethanol)
              • Home is where I am not: Prometheans staying in a single place for too long will corrupt the very world by their existence.
              • You made me do it!: Prometheans are prone to destructive outbursts of emotions called Torment when their very nature causes them too many problems.
              • Dramatic-Lightning-At-Opportune-Moment Technique: Using any of their power reveals the true nature of the Promethean for a fraction of a second
              • Azoth calls to Azoth: Prometheans can sense the presence of their kin in their vicinity and always see each other in their true form. They can't pinpoint the position of others, only know that they are near.
              • More than the sum of our parts: Prometheans can create alchemical pacts between themselves to control the various drawbacks of their existence


              Glorious Useless-Post Prana
              Cost: 2m; Mins: Linguistics 1, Essence 1 Type: Simple
              Keywords: Mute
              Duration: Instant
              Prerequisite Charms: Ten-Characters Methodology

              Comment


              • #8
                Charlaquin: Thank you! I added your contribution above, with slight edits where Vampires matched the baseline assumptions. Am I correct in assuming that the only difference between 1ed and 2ed is that 1ed doesn't have the "reveal supernatural nature to get target to fight/flight", while 2ed doesn't have "when vampires meet for the first time they go into fight/flight based on power"? "Difference" being "difference between mechanical traits that are true for all/most vampires."

                WHW: Fair enough; I'm not as familiar with Mage, and I've edited the entry accordingly. I also added Paradox; does that seem accurate? What else am I missing?

                Magnum Opus: Thank you! Do Prometheans also get Pyros from electricity, or am I misremembering?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by AceOfAlmonds View Post
                  Do Prometheans also get Pyros from electricity, or am I misremembering?
                  I think that's a transmutation. Doesn't come standard.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I just don't understand why do you use new, made up names for the things then they have a concrete name in the game line?
                    like Let Me Freshen up a bit (Vampires), why not just call it Blush of Life, which it really is, allows the new ST/not familair one, to easier get into the game afterwards.

                    We want the cheat sheet to help, and not to teach the ST a shitload of wrong terminology, which he will have to re-learn should he decide to read the book.


                    My Bloodline conversions
                    My House rules

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by AceOfAlmonds View Post
                      [*]They are otherwise identical to humans, in terms of consumption/healing/organization/aspirations/morality/etc.
                      This a very very very flawed assumption given that it mixes tons of different things, resulting in the fact that none of the splat are going to correspond to it.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by AceOfAlmonds View Post
                        Charlaquin: Thank you! I added your contribution above, with slight edits where Vampires matched the baseline assumptions. Am I correct in assuming that the only difference between 1ed and 2ed is that 1ed doesn't have the "reveal supernatural nature to get target to fight/flight", while 2ed doesn't have "when vampires meet for the first time they go into fight/flight based on power"? "Difference" being "difference between mechanical traits that are true for all/most vampires."
                        1ed vampires didn't have supernaturally enhanced abilities when it comes to tracking blood, and they still took lethal damage from bladed weapons. Also, blood bonds didn't work on other supernatural creatures in 1e. But otherwise yeah, pretty much the same as far as base template.

                        Originally posted by Griautis View Post
                        I just don't understand why do you use new, made up names for the things then they have a concrete name in the game line?
                        like Let Me Freshen up a bit (Vampires), why not just call it Blush of Life, which it really is, allows the new ST/not familair one, to easier get into the game afterwards.

                        We want the cheat sheet to help, and not to teach the ST a shitload of wrong terminology, which he will have to re-learn should he decide to read the book.
                        That's a good point. I liked coming up with cheeky names for the template abilities, but it certainly could be confusing.
                        Last edited by Charlaquin; 01-22-2016, 01:10 PM.


                        Going by Willow now, or Wil for short. She/Her/Hers.

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                        • #13
                          well then, why not "Let me Freshen up A Bit (Blush of Life)" ? Like... with those names, they're both confusing for old timers (under what name do I look for certain things?) and for newbies (How do I search for concrete mechanics of thing X in the books?) , so in essence the value of the cheat sheet becomes less useful for everyone. Cheeky names have their place and purpose... not in a cheatsheet which is supposed to help STs.


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                          • #14
                            I think it could be good to put the power names in parenthesis, but some of these powers don't have a name. The ease of recuperating Glamour or Pyros do not have a name, they're aspects of the Fuel. Also, "Oblations" "Bane of Purity" and "Superlative Constitution" are not terms we use often in our games, so calling them "Taboos", "Skin of a ginger" and "Back for Round Two" is sometimes clearer for crossover purposes


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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Elderand View Post

                              This a very very very flawed assumption given that it mixes tons of different things, resulting in the fact that none of the splat are going to correspond to it.
                              I mean, it's true, no splat will exactly correspond to it, but it's a safe assumption to make in a broad sense. Like, does every given supernatural need to eat human food to survive? Yes, except vampires (blood and only blood) and prometheans (anything organic counts). (And maybe mummies? I have no idea how those guys work.) Does every supernatural heal at a human rate? No, most of them don't, but there's no stronger "average" way they heal, so each one gets a line on how they heal, except the ones that don't (changelings, mages, hunters, maybe beasts). If a majority of the splats do a thing a certain way (like have a power stat, or can recognize each other by sight), I'm fine with adding it to the base assumptions and then marking where it changes, but I don't think saying "assume standard human traits until told otherwise" is an incorrect thing to do.


                              Originally posted by Charlaquin View Post
                              1ed vampires didn't have supernaturally enhanced abilities when it comes to tracking blood, and they still took lethal damage from bladed weapons. Also, blood bonds didn't work on other supernatural creatures in 1e. But otherwise yeah, pretty much the same as far as base template....
                              Thanks!


                              Originally posted by Griautis View Post
                              well then, why not "Let me Freshen up A Bit (Blush of Life)" ? Like... with those names, they're both confusing for old timers (under what name do I look for certain things?) and for newbies (How do I search for concrete mechanics of thing X in the books?) , so in essence the value of the cheat sheet becomes less useful for everyone. Cheeky names have their place and purpose... not in a cheatsheet which is supposed to help STs.
                              That is a good point; I was coming up with whimsical names because it seemed like a fun idea at the time, but it does make it less clear. I'll edit the ones that have given names.

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