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The Innocence System from the Walking Shadows Campaign (Integrity et al. replacement)

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  • The Innocence System from the Walking Shadows Campaign (Integrity et al. replacement)

    Innocence
    ************************************************** *****************************

    All things truly wicked start from innocence.
    Ernest Hemingway
    ************************************************** *****************************

    Innocence is what replaces the World of Darkness Morality bar, because Morality has a lot of issues with it that we won't get into here. Innocence, like Morality, is measured in dots, which can be lost or gained through player actions. The purpose of Innocence is to measure empathy towards other beings, and what the World of Darkness has forced your character to do to survive. It is important to note that Innocence is not a measure of morality, or of right and wrong. A child who is forced to steal an apple for her starving mother may not be considered morally wrong, but she will likely become less Innocent. That being said, people with lower Innocence scores are often jaded by the world, and are more likely to resort to actions that higher Innocence characters would never entertain.

    Each character starts the game with an Innocence of 7, which represents the normal adult human view on the world. Characters who violate their ethics lose dots of Innocence. Each dot of Innocence has a set of actions that can cause a character to fall to a lower Innocence rating. These actions tend to be marked by harm to other living beings or other failures in empathy.

    InnocenceFalling Point
    10 Selfish thoughts (5)
    9 Minor selfish act (withholding charity) (5)
    8 Injury to another (accidental or otherwise) (4)
    7 Willful petty theft (shoplifting) (4)
    6 Grand theft (burglary) (3)
    5 Intentional, mass property damage (arson) (3)
    4 Impassioned crime (manslaughter) (3)
    3 Planned crime (murder) (2)
    2 Casual/callous crime (serial murder) (2)
    1 Utter perversion, heinous act (mass murder) (2)

    If a character commits an act equal to or worse than the threshold of his current Innocence trait, roll the number of dice associated with the act performed to avoid falling. If the roll succeeds, the character's overall sense of compassion remains intact, and his Innocence does not change. If the roll fails, your character is changed by this action, and he loses a point of Innocence. A character can willingly choose to fall in Innocence if he feels it is appropriate: if so, the character may take a Beat.

    Characters at Innocence of 2-3 gain the Weak-Souled Condition, and Characters at Innocence 0-1 gain the Hollow-Souled Condition (see below for more details). Only Mortals or Extraordinary Mortals gain these Conditions -- supernatural creatures have their own Banes (also see below).

    If a character falls so far that her Innocence drops to zero, she has been permanently marked by her actions and their consequences. Barring exceptional circumstances, she can never regain Innocence again.

    Marks

    When a character loses a dot of Innocence, they gain a Mark. A Mark is a persistent condition that is based on the action that caused the character to lose their Innocence. Functionally, the Mark makes a note of the action that caused the loss of Innocence. The Mark remains until the character takes some action to resolve it, by performing some manner of fair restitution - either to their previous victim or others in a similar situation - and acknowledging that their past actions were harmful and undeserved to the person they wronged. Obviously, more serious actions require far more serious restitution. A theft can be resolved with monetary recompense, while a murder may require prolonged restitution to everyone negatively affected by that person's death, or long periods of time attempting to prevent other murders. Resolving the Mark causes the character to refresh all Willpower, and to gain one experience point, which can be spent on raising Innocence.

    As long as the Mark persists, the character remains affected by the action that caused her to fall in Innocence. Every time the consequences of the action, or the failure to make restitution for it, comes back to negatively affect the character, take a Beat. While this may appear as if restitution and forgiveness is a long and unrewarding task compared to unrepentance, this often mirrors real life.

    Optional -- Not Used in WS: (Should the GM wish to give Marks more of an impact, remove the ability to rebuy Innocence with exp. Resolving Marks will be the only way for a fallen character to regain Innocence. Should the Storyteller choose to go this route, each character will need to start the game with Marks for falling from Innocence 8-10, as it will be impossible to reach these states otherwise.)

    Marked (Persistent)

    You did something. Maybe you were forced to, maybe it was for a good reason, maybe you just didn't care. Maybe it's preying on your mind now, or maybe you're having a harder time mustering up compassion over it. Whatever the case, it changed you.
    Resolution: Make equal restitution for your action, to the victim or others in similar situations.
    Beat: The consequences of your former action negatively impact you.
    Expiration: Persistent


    Supernaturals and Innocence

    Being changed into the supernatural has a strong impact on a character's psyche. Things that were once important to a human might become lessened, or heightened, by the experience. The supernatural are capable of things beyond the mortal ken, and thus are capable of harming others in ways that mortals never could. What this means in practical terms is that, upon the transformation into the supernatural, a character replaces their Innocence with an equivalent stat. For vampires it's Humanity, for Changelings it's Clarity, for Mages it's Wisdom, and for Werewolves it's Harmony. These each have their own set of Falling Points that can cause a character to lose dots in the stat - a vampire is affected less by shoplifting a jacket when compared to her slow descent into monstrousness, while a mage can commit acts of high hubris without harming another living being.

    Every supernatural creature has Banes, supernatural weaknesses that plague their very nature. Many of these are commonly known, such as the vampire aversion to sunlight or the fae weakness to cold iron. As a supernatural creature continues to fall, their banes become more and more of an impediment. For example, a newly fledged vampire might have an unpleasant reaction to the sun, but treat it as nothing more than an extremely painful sunburn, while an ancient and evil vampire will be nearly debilitated by a single pinprick of sunlight.
    What About Mortals?
    While supernatural creatures are continually affected by their falling Innocence-stats, mortals do not have supernatural Banes. Does this mean they get off scott free for their actions? In a word, yes -
    Mostly. World of Darkness is an Urban Fantasy game, and thus mechanical penalties for low Innocence will usually come of as arbitrary and unrealistic. Organized crime members commit many crimes without being mentally broken by them, murderers are often known to be charming and do not suffer random social penalties, and no machine gun has ever harmed the guilty more than the innocent.

    That being said, there is one area where Innocence can affect someone: against the supernatural. Being innocent cannot protect a character against the depredation of monstrous foes, but it does not harm them either. While the natural world does not react to a character's loss of Innocence, the supernatural world does. Those with low innocence have been marked by the corruption of the world, and the supernatural can find more cracks in the soul to work its way in. This is most noticeable in the demons from Inferno, who clash their wills against their victims' Innocence - however, all major supernatural creatures might find their powers have a stronger effect on those who have lower Innocence scores. Mortals with an Innocence of 2-3 gain the Weak-Souled Condition, while those with Innocence 0-1 gain the Hollow-Souled Condition.
    Weak-Souled (Persistent)
    The character has done so many dark things that there are very few things truly unthinkable to him, and this lets the supernatural worm its tendrils into his psyche and into his very being. The character takes a -1 penalty on all Resistance rolls against any supernatural power.
    Resolution: Raise Innocence above 3 or drop it below 2.
    Beat: The character waives his resistance roll against a supernatural power.
    Expiration: Persistent

    Hollow-Souled (Persistent)
    Someone who has done so many violent, heinous acts, even if he had his reasons, even if it was for a good cause, is somehow marked. There's an emptiness about the character now, something subtle but nevertheless there. The character takes a -2 penalty on all Resistance rolls against any supernatural power.
    Resolution: Raise Innocence above 1.
    Beat: The character waives his resistance roll against a supernatural power.
    Expiration: Persistent



    GM of the Walking Shadow Campaigns
    New System and Setting Material

  • #2
    ************************************************** *****************************

    Breaking Points

    The World of Darkness is not a comforting place to live. Strange and unnatural things lurk beneath the mundane surface of the world, and occasionally people catch a glimpse of them. Characters in a World of Darkness chronicle will likely confront something that shatters their comfortable perceptions of reality. These are known as Breaking Points, and they can have a negative impact on the character's psyche. Breaking Points are usually triggered by exposure to the supernatural world, and can result in a character becoming maddened or shaken until they come to terms with it. If a human encounters something undeniably supernatural, they roll Resolve+Composure, with situational modifiers to the roll depending on the severity of the situation. On a failed roll, they can become Shaken or Spooked (player's choice). On a Dramatic Failure, the character can gain one of these conditions: Madness, Broken, or Obsession (player's choice). On an Exceptional Success, the character is never bothered by similar Breaking Points again.
    Shaken
    Something has severely frightened your character. Your character takes a -1 to physical rolls, as her fear hinders her actions.
    Resolution: Any time your character takes an action that is penalized by this effect, you may opt to fail the roll and resolve this Condition.
    Beat: n/a
    Expiration: Scene

    Spooked
    Your character has seen something supernatural — not overt enough to terrify her, but unmistakably otherworldly. How your character responds to this is up to you, but it captivates her and dominates her focus. She takes a -1 penalty to mental rolls until this condition is resolved.
    Resolution: This Condition is resolved when your character’s fear and fascination causes her to do something that hinders the group or complicates things (she goes off alone to investigate a strange noise, stays up all night researching, runs away instead of holding her ground, etc.).
    Beat: n/a
    Expiration: Scene


    Suggested Modifiers
    The character is heavily armed (+1)
    The character is in a large group (+1)
    The character has some manner of strong barrier between her and the creature (+1)
    The character's safety precautions had no effect on the creature (-2)
    The character's weapons had no effect on the creature (-2)
    The character was affected by a supernatural power and realizes it (-3)
    The encounter is violent (-4)
    The encounter results in the death of a friend or loved one (-5)

    Supernatural creatures also have Breaking Points, but unlike humans, they are not affected by encountering the supernatural world - they arethe supernatural world. Supernatural breaking points instead come from dealing with their new condition, transitioning between mortal and supernatural, and being forced to deal with new aspects of their natures. A vampire will encounter a Breaking Point the first time they feed from a human - being forced to sink their teeth into another person's flesh, and finding they enjoy the taste of blood. A changeling will face Breaking Points for encountering one of the Gentry, or for having as piece of their life torn away from them once again. Each supernatural template has their own specific Breaking Points that affect them, as a result of their transformation and their own specific natures.


    GM of the Walking Shadow Campaigns
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    Comment


    • #3
      Clarity
      ************************************************** *****************************

      Every changeling, no matter how kind or humble, has been irrevocably changed by their time in Arcadia. The rules that comprised reality have been broken not once, but twice. A changeling can no longer say with any certainty that something is impossible, and they can no longer say for certain that human rules still apply to them. If a changeling isn't careful, they may find themselves caught up in the power of the Wyrd, and transformed into that which they most hate.

      Instead of Innocence, changelings possess Clarity, a measure of how much the character resembles the True Fae. The True Fae are known for their inability to empathize with others, and for being ruled by selfishness. A character maintains Clarity by attempting to keep their mindset human - she loses it via failures in empathy toward humanity.

      ClarityFalling Point
      10 Dreamwalking. Using magic to accomplish a task when it could be achieved just as well without. (5)
      9 Minor selfish acts (breaking mundane promises). (5)
      8 Injury to another (accidental or otherwise) (4)
      7 Willful petty theft from a human (shoplifting) (4)
      6 Grand theft (burglary). (3)
      5 Killing another changeling. Killing a fetch. (3)
      4 Impassioned or impulsive serious crimes towards humans (manslaughter). (3)
      3 Actively harming a mortal by ravaging their dreams. Kidnapping. Reenacting a Keeper's cruelty. (2)
      2 Killing a human. Casual/callous crime against other supernaturals (serial murder). (2)
      1 Heinous acts of torture, depravity or perversion. Willfully turning over a human to the True Fae. (2)

      Changelings that fall to Clarity zero are known as the Mad, and can never regain Clarity outside of exceptional circumstances. Most retreat into the Hedge, and many become Loyalists and servants of the True Fae.
      ************************************************** *****************************

      Breaking Points

      Changelings have lost everything. They lost their families, they lost their very concept of reality, and most lost even their sense of self. Every changeling regains some of this when they crawl back through the Thorns, but their grasp on this world is still tenuous. Anything that upsets the changeling's sense of self can have a devastating impact on their psyche, even if that change is otherwise good for the changeling. Changelings, when encountering a Breaking Point, roll their Clarity. On a success, they are shaken, but otherwise unaffected. On a failure, they gain one of these conditions: Reversion, Rebellion, or Feytouched (player's choice). On a Dramatic Failure, the character gains one of these conditions: Madness, Broken, or Obsession (player's choice). At the Storyteller's discretion, the player may instead create another condition and apply it to his character instead.
      • Going too long without human contact (usually a week or more).
      • Losing important mortal friendships or connections.
      • Taking psychotropic drugs.
      • Serious unexpected life changes.
      • Revealing your true form to unensorcelled mortals.
      • Obvious displays of magic in front of witnesses.
      • Breaking formal oaths or pledges.
      • Developing Madness.†
      • Spending time in Arcadia.
      • Reenacting unpleasant parts of the changeling's Durance.
      • Prolonged or intimate contact with the True Fae.
      • Mortal identity is suddenly and unexpectedly destroyed, totally abandoned or otherwise fundamentally changed.

        † Does not apply to Madness gained from a Dramatic Failure on a Breaking Point roll.
      Reversion (Changeling Only)
      Your character has lost a piece of her mortal life, or been jarred into recalling her Durance. Whatever the cause, she instinctively reverts back to her faerie self, acting as she would if she were still a slave under her Keeper. She takes a -1 to all non-Contract rolls until this condition is resolved.
      Resolution: This Condition is resolved when your character encounters or returns to a touchstone of her mortal life, and is convinced or able to convince herself that it is real.
      Beat: The character hinders herself or harms another due to her unusual behavior.
      Expiration: Scene

      Rebellion (Changeling Only)
      Your character has been burned by his faerie nature, and his mind subconsciously tries to reject it. All of his contracts cost an additional glamour to invoke until the condition is resolved.
      Resolution: This Condition is resolved when your character either burns through all his glamour casting Contracts, or harvests an amount of glamour points equal to his Wyrd.
      Beat: The changeling refuses to use a Contract even when it would be helpful to himself or another.
      Expiration: Scene

      Feytouched (Changeling Only)
      Your character has fallen head-long into the Wyrd. She becomes convinced the logic of faerie tales applies to real life. She takes a -3 to all rolls involving Mental Skills, until the condition is resolved.
      Resolution: This Condition is resolved when your character is confronted with absolute proof that one of her incorrect conclusions is false.
      Beat: The changeling's strange logic causes her to act upon an erroneous conclusion.
      Expiration: Scene
      Suggested Modifiers
      The character's motley is present (+1 for each motley member)
      The character's Court is in season (+1)
      A mortal friend or family member is supporting the character (+1)
      A mortal friend or family member is placed in danger by the event (-2)
      The Breaking Point occurred as a result of choosing faerie matters over mortal ones. (-2)
      The event violates a trusted assumption the character held about the world (such as being betrayed by a friend) (-3)
      The character's Keeper is involved (-4)
      The event occurs in some place that the changeling identifies as "safe" or "home" (-5)


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      • #4
        Harmony
        ************************************************** *****************************


        When a wolf-blood is transformed into a werewolf, his "soul" is irrevocably transmogrified by Luna into the spirit of a wolf. All spirits have Bans, actions that go against its very nature. However, as a half-man creature, a werewolf can violate those bans, if he so chooses. Harmony does not care about right, wrong, or reasons - you have either broken your Bans, or you have not. However, breaking these bans can cause a werewolf's spirit to warp and twist, turning into something sick and unnatural.

        The Forsaken and the Pure have different Bans, due to the Pure's rejection of Luna. This difference tends to add to the animosity of the two factions, as the Pure are incredibly degenerate by the standards of the Forsaken.

        Harmony (Forsaken)Falling Point
        10 Not shapeshifting for more than three days (5)
        9 Not obtaining your own food; carrying a silver weapon (5)
        8 Going a week without seeing moonlight; allowing an Outsider to hold power in your territory† (4)
        7 Spending too much time alone; violating a tribal vow (4)
        6 Slaying a wolf or human needlessly (3)
        5 Slaying a werewolf in the heat of battle (3)
        4 Revealing the existence of werewolves to a human; using a silver weapon against another werewolf (3)
        3 Torturing enemies/prey; murdering another werewolf (2)
        2 Hunting humans or wolves for food (2)
        1 Betrayal of Pack; hunting werewolves for food (1)

        † Does not apply to pack totems

        Harmony (Pure)Falling Point
        10 Not shapeshifting for more than three days (5)
        9 Not obtaining your own food (5)
        8 Disrespect to a patron spirit; disrespect to your prey (4)
        7 Spending too much time alone; violating a tribal vow (4)
        6 Slaying a wolf or human needlessly; murdering a werewolf while it is helpless (3)
        5 Willingly touching silver (3)
        4 Swearing allegiance to someone inferior††; Using a silver weapon against another werewolf (3)
        3 Torturing enemies/prey (2)
        2 Hunting humans or wolves for food (2)
        1 Betrayal of Pack; hunting werewolves for food (1)

        †† No matter how inferior someone may be, this ban does not apply if they have bested the Pure in any respectable manner - and the uncertainty caused by this Ban tends to result in Pure demanding challenges from any who seek their aid.

        Werewolves that fall to Harmony zero are known as the Zi'ir or Broken-Souled, and can never regain Harmony outside of exceptional circumstances. They become strange, alien creatures, and most become Corrupted Werewolves or fall into permanent Death Rage, and must be put down swiftly.
        ************************************************** *****************************


        Breaking Points

        Werewolves are not human, but they once were, and the transition between man and werewolf can be a painful one. Werewolves are soldiers in the war against the Outside, and theirs is a violent existence. When a werewolf is confronted with that violence, roll a werewolf's Harmony. On a success, they are shaken and possibly revolted with themselves, but otherwise unaffected. On a failure, they gain one of these conditions: Humanocentric, Enraged, or Domineering (player's choice). On a Dramatic Failure, the character immediately goes into Death Rage. At the Storyteller's discretion, the player may instead create another condition and apply it to his character instead.
        • Killing a person
        • Severely hurting a mortal
        • Surviving something that would kill a mortal
        • Seeing a mortal badly hurt or killed by Outsiders
        • Spend more than three days in the Shadow
        Humanocentric (Werewolf Only)
        Horrified, the character rejects the wolf within and subconsciously shuns his other half. All of his Gifts and shapeshifting cost an additional point of Essence to activate, until this condition is resolved.
        Resolution: This Condition is resolved when your character either burns through all his Essence shapeshifting or using Gifts, or until he hunts and gains an amount of Essence equal to his Primal Urge
        Beat: The shapeshifter refuses to use a Gift or to shapeshift even when it would be helpful to himself or another.
        Expiration: Scene

        Enraged (Werewolf Only)
        Furious and hurt by the world, the character lets her Rage take over her mind. The character takes a -2 to all Mental rolls and to Death Rage rolls until this condition is resolved.
        Resolution: The character works out her aggressive urges, either by engaging in combat or destroying some large or significant object (a car, a wall, some prized possession)
        Beat: The character’s aggression gets her into trouble.
        Expiration: Scene

        Domineering
        As things spiral out of control, the character reacts by trying to take charge of a situation and impose order upon it. The character’s drive to dominate forces her to give it her all in any competition with another character (mental, social, physical, or supernatural) – she suffers a -2 on any rolls where she doesn’t spend Willpower. This includes contested and extended rolls.
        Resolution: The character utterly dominates some other character (not one to whom she began the scene already superior to).
        Beat: The character exhausts her willpower.
        Expiration: Scene
        Suggested Modifiers
        The character's Auspice Moon is visible (+1)
        The character's pack is present (+1)
        The situation takes place in a very violent or unsafe environment, such as the Shadow, a war zone, or a violent slum (+1)
        The situation takes place in an area that is perceived as safe or mundane, such as a sleepy suburb (-1)
        The character is responsible for the violence (-2)
        Mortal, 'civilian' humans are involved (-1)
        Children are involved (-3)


        GM of the Walking Shadow Campaigns
        New System and Setting Material

        Comment


        • #5
          Humanity
          ************************************************** *****************************

          While many vampires proudly proclaim their inhumanity, the truth is that the predatory nature of the Kindred is only a thin overlay over what is still, essentially, a human being. Kindred grew up as humans and drunk deeply of human morality, human ethos, of humanity, and humanity, it turns out, is a surprisingly resilient psychological concept. But it can be eroded, and while no vampire is necessarily a monster, a vampire can choose to become one.

          A Kindred's Humanity measures how much of that mortal ethos remains -- how much the vampire still identifies herself with the common mortal herd. The mark of the high-Humanity vampire is the idea that human beings have worth, and the mark of the low-Humanity vampire that they don't, that they only exist as prey animals to sate Kindred hungers. The problem, of course, is that every Kindred must of necessity harm others in order to survive, and so disassociating oneself from humanity, treating mortals as a lesser 'Other' is both easy and attractive. In practical terms, Humanity mostly revolves around questions of physical harm to others, as Kindred inflict it by their very nature, while at the same time, an undead creature that drinks blood has a hard time getting worked up over shoplifting.
          A Note on the Beast

          It is both correct and incorrect to think of the Beast as an animal - certainly, many Gangrel resemble animals when in the throes of frenzy. The Beast reacts on animal instinct, snarling at those who threaten it, fleeing from that which frightens it, and killing so it can feed. In some ways, there is an underlying current to the Beast that makes up the shared vampire experience. But the true
          core of the Beast comes from each individual vampire. It is the part of a vampire's personality that has been twisted by undeath - the part that not only can drink another human's blood, but enjoys it. The Beast is thus individual to each clan, and in smaller ways individual to each vampire. A bookish Mekhet isn't going to fly into a sudden tantrum and flail helplessly at a greater foe, when in the throes of Frenzy. What the Mekhet will do, however, is "accidentally" let a large pile of ruinous secrets get out, or gaslight their foe into insanity. And the Mekhet will do this, because she can and doesn't care about the consequences. That is the hallmark of the Beast: it does not care.

          Thus is the true danger of Frenzy. Vampires caught up by the beast don't necessarily fly into a rage. Instead they act as they would normally - if they no longer cared about the consequences of anything. For the Beast does not care about anything, beyond its own selfish emotions. It doesn't matter if the Beast lashes out and harms the wrong person, because the Beast doesn't care about that. The Beast does not even care about self-preservation or interest, unless it is physically beaten and forced to confront its imminent mortality - far reaching consequences simply don't register on its mind. It doesn't matter if Niall knows that releasing certain blackmail info will get him killed, he will do it anyway, because the Beast does not care. It doesn't matter if Sheridan's faithful ghoul has served her without lapse for fifty years, she will kill him in a fit of paranoia anyway, because the Beast does not care. It does not matter how much Sophie Penrose truly loves someone, she will leave them a flaming, broken wreck over a tiny lover's spat, because the Beast doesn't care.

          The Kindred do not fear dragur because they are mindless animals. They fear because there is literally nothing that vampire society can do to control one. Threats will not work, social pressure will not work, bribery will not work, not even a pledge will work. A dragur is ruled by the Beast, and will break any promise at a moment's whim, because nothing matters to it.


          HumanityFalling Point
          10 Using Vitae for any purpose beyond waking from slumber (5)
          9 Petty theft (shoplifting) (5)
          8 Coercing a human with a Discipline (4)
          7 Feeding from the unwilling†, ghouling a human being (4)
          6 Grand theft (burglary), Intentional, mass property damage (arson) (3)
          5 Violent feeding from the unwilling, assault, maiming a human being (3)
          4 Impassioned crime (manslaughter, killing someone during frenzy or feeding) (3)
          3 Planned crime (murder) (2)
          2 Casual/callous crime (torture, serial murder), Creating a revenant (2)
          1 Utter perversion, heinous act (mass murder), diablerie, creating a vampire from someone unwilling (2)

          † applies to unconscious vessels or using Dominate to force them to submit.

          Vampires that fall to Humanity zero are called Draugr, and can never regain Humanity outside of exceptional circumstances. They fall into a permanent, never-ending Frenzy, and are among the most terrifying of Kindred.
          ************************************************** *****************************

          Breaking Points

          Vampires are not human, but they all started as such. Coming to terms with their new existence can be a rocky process. When encountering a Breaking Point, roll the vampire's Humanity. On a success, they are shaken and possibly revolted with themselves, but otherwise unaffected. On a failure, they gain one of these conditions: Atavism, Rejection, or Indulgence (player's choice). On a Dramatic Failure, the character gains one of these conditions: Madness, Addicted, or Obsession (player's choice). At the Storyteller's discretion, the player may instead create another condition and apply it to his character instead.

          Breaking Points eventually fade with time. A vampire who doesn't get over drinking blood will not last long as a vampire. Breaking points are categorized as Minor, Major, and Enduring. A Minor Breaking Point need only be succeeded at three times before the vampire is no longer affected by them -- outside of unusual circumstances, most vampires will work through all of their Minor Breaking Points within their first few months of undeath. A Major Breaking will stick with a vampire for years, but will likely stop applying by the time they become an Elder. An Enduring Breaking Point affects a vampire no matter what.

          Minor
          • Drinking a human's blood.
          • Watching humans eat a meal.
          • Spending an hour in the sun.
          • Reading your own obituary.
          Major
          • Riding the wave of frenzy.
          • Surviving something that would hospitalize a human.
          • Two weeks without human contact.
          • Falling into torpor.
          • Being rejected by someone due to your undead nature.
          Enduring
          • Death of mortal friends or family.
          • Surviving a century.
          • Seeing a culture or major technological innovation that didn't exist when you were alive
          • A year without human contact
          • Creating another vampire
          Rejection (Vampire Only)
          Your character has been confronted with his undead nature, and his mind subconsciously tries to reject it. All of his Disciplines and Blood Buffs cost an additional point of Vitae to activate until this condition is resolved.
          Resolution: This Condition is resolved when your character either burns through all his Vitae casting Disciplines or Blood Buffing, or until he feeds and gains an amount of Vitae equal to his Blood Potency.
          Beat: The vampire refuses to use a Discipline or to Blood Buff even when it would be helpful to himself or another.
          Expiration: Scene

          Atavism (Vampire Only)
          Furious and hurt by the world, the character lets the Beast take over his mind. The character takes a -2 to all Mental rolls and to Frenzy rolls until this condition is resolved.
          Resolution: The character works out his aggressive urges, either by engaging in combat or destroying some large or significant object (a car, a wall, a souvenir of his mortal life)
          Beat: The character’s aggression gets him into trouble.
          Expiration: Scene

          Indulgence (Vampire Only)
          Rather than admit the fact that he’s a mockery of nature, the character tries to fill his empty heart with fleeting pleasures. The character takes a -3 to any Resolve or Composure roll to resist social or supernatural influence or temptation, and must roll Resolve+Composure (at the aforementioned penalty) to resist indulging when an opportunity arises.
          Resolution: The character indulges in his Vice in a harmful manner, or feeds and gains an amount of Vitae equal to his Blood Potency.
          Beat: The character makes some manner of poor life choice.
          Expiration: Scene
          Note: While this Condition most often takes the form of lust or hunger, it can be more diverse – a Mekhet going on a splurge shopping trip to old bookstores is a valid expression of Indulgence, particularly if he spends more than he can afford.
          Suggested Modifiers
          The character's coterie is present (+1)
          A mortal touchstone is present (+1)
          A supportive leader from the vampire's covenant is present. (+1)
          The vampire is in sunlight (-2)
          The vampire is hungry (less that 1/3 vitae remaining) (-2)
          The Breaking Point occurred as a result of choosing the Masquerade over mortal concerns. (-2)
          Being over 100 years old (-1)
          Being over 500 years old (does not stack with being 100 years old) (-2)


          GM of the Walking Shadow Campaigns
          New System and Setting Material

          Comment


          • #6
            Wisdom
            ************************************************** *****************************

            “Power corrupts; absolute power corrupts absolutely,” – this is the central dilemma of Awakened existence. Wizards are still human, heir to all the failings and weaknesses of the mortal form. But they are humans who have been granted impossible power, magic that allows them to heal the sick, raise the dead, call fire and lightning, alter minds, change their form, know the future, and virtually any other act they can imagine. The fatal flaw of the Awakened is Hubris, a blasphemous and overweening pride that whispers to the mage that they need not be bound by the laws of nature or lesser men.

            A mage’s Wisdom measures how well they have resisted the temptation of their power. The high-Wisdom mage is one who realizes that just because they can do something, doesn’t mean they should – a mindset alien to the low-Wisdom mage, for whom any restriction on their power is anathema. Mages maintain Wisdom by limiting themselves, and lose it by acts of pride, violating the laws of man and nature.

            WisdomFalling Point
            10 Selfish Thoughts. (5)
            9 Minor selfish acts. Using magic to accomplish a task when it could be achieved just as well without. (5)
            8 Injury to another (accidental or otherwise) (4)
            7 Manipulating emotions. Willful petty theft from a human (shoplifting) (4)
            6 Magically coercing another to do an action that they do not object to. Forcibly binding a ghost or spirit against their will. Grand theft (burglary). (3)
            5 Cursing someone (with bad luck or such). Mass property damage (arson). (3)
            4 Magically coercing another to do an action that they would object to. Using magic to harm someone. Impassioned or impulsive serious crimes (manslaughter). (3)
            3 Bringing the dead back against their will. Dealing with the Abyss. Causing someone to be possessed against their will. Planned crime without magic (murder). (2)
            2 Magically coercing another to do an action that would violate their moral code. Using magic to murder someone. Casual/callous crime (serial murder). Stealing a soul. (2)
            1 Creating life. Heinous acts of torture, depravity or perversion. Destroying a soul. (2)

            Mages that fall to Wisdom zero are known as the Mad, and can never regain Wisdom outside of exceptional circumstances. Their souls break, and many begin to shed supernatural tulpas from their broken psyches, thought-forms capable of arcane acts that embody the Mad’s primal id.
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            Breaking Points

            The cornerstone of every mage’s psyche is the desire for knowledge – it was their openness to supernal truth in the first place that allowed them to Awaken. Their appetites whetted by that first taste of cosmic understanding, every mage is driven to know more, to try and expand their knowledge of the universe. It can take the form of a childish curiosity or a lunatic obsession, but all have it.

            When encountering a Breaking Point, Mages roll their Wisdom. On a success, their pulse quickens and their breath catches, but they are able to strangle down any untoward reaction. On a failure, they gain one of these conditions: Fixation, Paranoia, or Crisis of Confidence (player's choice). On a Dramatic Failure, the character gains one of these conditions: Madness or Obsession, or increases his Paradox Level by 4 (player's choice). At the Storyteller's discretion, the player may instead create another condition and apply it to his character instead.
            • Encountering a new type of supernatural creature†
            • Encountering a never-before-seen type of spell†
            • Coming across a portal to a new plane of existence†
            • Coming across a grimoire
            • Coming across an Artifact
            • Being offered tutelage by a powerful supernatural entity

              † New is taken to mean ‘new to the wizard in question,’ though unless the character has only just Awakened they can be assumed to be familiar with the main set of creatures (vampires, changelings, werewolves), planes (the Twilight, and the near reaches of the Shadow, Hedge, and Underworld), and spells (the Mysteries) in London.
            Fixation
            Offered a glimpse or a taste of knowledge, your character has decided that they must have it, to the exclusion of all other considerations. They suffer a -2 penalty on any roll not related to getting the object of their fixation, but gain the 9-again quality on the rolls that do relate.
            Resolution: Your character acquires the object of their fixation, or it is destroyed or otherwise moved unambiguously out of reach.
            Beat: Character fails to fulfill an obligation due to pursuing her fixation.
            Expiration: Scene

            Paranoia
            When the prospect of gaining knowledge is in the air, your character becomes paranoid and possessive, convinced that everyone else is trying to take their power or knowledge away from them (even if said power or knowledge isn’t actually theirsto begin with). The character takes a -2 to all social rolls and a -1 to all mental rolls as they think everyone is out to get them.
            Resolution: Your character withdraws to a safe place (usually their Lair), or to the company of a True Friend who wasn’t present when the Breaking Point occurred.
            Beat: The character refuses aid or assistance due to their paranoia.
            Expiration: Scene

            Crisis of Confidence (Mage Only)
            Having seen true power and knowledge, the mage is left feeling uncertain and inadequate about his own abilities. All of his Mysteries take an additional point of Mana to activate.
            Resolution: This Condition is resolved when your character either burns through all his Mana casting Mysteries, or gains an amount of Mana points equal to his Primal Urge.
            Beat: The mage doesn’t use a Mystery even when it would be helpful to himself or another.
            Expiration: Scene
            Suggested Modifiers
            The character’s cabal is present (+1)
            The character’s apprentice is present (+1)
            The character’s master is present (+1)
            The knowledge in question is particularly distant from the character’s interests (+1)
            The knowledge in question is particularly close to the character’s interests (-2)
            The knowledge is being offered as part of a deal of some sort (-1)
            The knowledge is being freely offered (-2)
            The knowledge involves the Supernal (-2)


            GM of the Walking Shadow Campaigns
            New System and Setting Material

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            • #7
              Originally posted by NeoTiamat View Post
              a measure of how much the character resembles the True Fae. The True Fae are known for their inability to empathize with others, and for being ruled by selfishness. A character maintains Clarity by attempting to keep their mindset human - she loses it via failures in empathy toward humanity.
              I just saw this thread and I wanted to point something out.

              Clarity is a measure of how well you can tell what's real and what's not. The True Fae resemblance is the effect, not the cause. A Clarity 0 Changeling might kill people with True Fae like casualness not because they can't emphasises but because they don't realise that person actually is a real person.


              “There are no rules. Only Principles and natural laws.” - Promethius
              My Homebrew no longer fits in a signature, you can find an index of it here.
              Full length fan-books I contributed too: Princess: the Hopeful, Leviathan: the Tempest, Dream Catchers

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