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Do the lessons a Beast teaches have to agree with each other

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  • #31
    When you get right down to it, the whole teaching lessons thing is just an excuse anyways. The Horror doesn't care if its victim learns something in the process, it just wants to slake its hunger.

    I imagine that a brood consisting of multiple different families or hungers would run into a situation like this rather frequently. Each of the families embody a different fear, and each hunger resonates with a different lesson. So having a bunch of different Beasts come to a consensus on how and what to teach would be a pipe dream. The best they could do is compromise and try not to step on each others' toes.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Nyrufa View Post
      When you get right down to it, the whole teaching lessons thing is just an excuse anyways. The Horror doesn't care if its victim learns something in the process, it just wants to slake its hunger.

      I imagine that a brood consisting of multiple different families or hungers would run into a situation like this rather frequently. Each of the families embody a different fear, and each hunger resonates with a different lesson. So having a bunch of different Beasts come to a consensus on how and what to teach would be a pipe dream. The best they could do is compromise and try not to step on each others' toes.
      The most ironic thing though? It's pretty likely that Beasts with their varying Lessons are HARMING the Primordial Dream even more.

      That because so many different types of Lessons are being taught at once, often with different and contradictory messages, that means mortals become very confused on what Lessons they are supposed to be learning versus what they aren't supposed to learn.

      Hell, the Fearful Lesson Dark Era even sort of hints at this:

      Originally posted by A Fearful Lesson, p. 242
      Observing how Beasts interacted with the South may offer a clearer perspective on why Reconstruction failed. After all, a Beast’s most emotionally (and ethically) fulfilling meal usually comes when her victim learns an important lesson. Without a sense of purpose or cultural unity, these lessons lose their meaning. A white supremacist might wake up to the pain she has caused, but a different man gets taught the perils of supporting black voting rights.

      Eventually, any meaningful signal gets lost and everything becomes little more than noise. Prejudice reinforces prejudice, and no one can find their way forward.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by tasti man LH View Post

        The most ironic thing though? It's pretty likely that Beasts with their varying Lessons are HARMING the Primordial Dream even more.

        That because so many different types of Lessons are being taught at once, often with different and contradictory messages, that means mortals become very confused on what Lessons they are supposed to be learning versus what they aren't supposed to learn.

        No, they are not harming it. The primordial dream is the collective subconscious of the species' roots. It's the world as seen through the eyes of hunter-gatherers. Xenophobia, bigotry and the like are not bugs of the primordial dream, they are features (having heightened group cohesion when outsiders encroach, dividing the world in clear-cut categories, whipping yourself into a hateful frenzy before contact). The primordial dream at it's purest would be modern society collapsing and everyone sitting around the campfire again and telling each other of the giant monsters they saw.

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        • #34
          The increased number of Beasts is probably causing problems for the Primordial Dream, but I don't imagine it's in any more of a complication than just what's happened due to the massive spike in human population.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by Davesknd View Post


            No, they are not harming it. The primordial dream is the collective subconscious of the species' roots. It's the world as seen through the eyes of hunter-gatherers. Xenophobia, bigotry and the like are not bugs of the primordial dream, they are features (having heightened group cohesion when outsiders encroach, dividing the world in clear-cut categories, whipping yourself into a hateful frenzy before contact). The primordial dream at it's purest would be modern society collapsing and everyone sitting around the campfire again and telling each other of the giant monsters they saw.


            Exactly. It's called the Primordial Dream for a reason, it goes back to our most primal fears from the dawn of our species. No matter what form they take, Beasts still embody the basic fears of weakness, darkness, exposure, revulsion and being out of your element.



            In the great olden days, an Anakim may have stemmed from the fear of large beasts who required entire hunting parties to bring down safely. In the modern nights, they might be the CEO of a mega-corporation who buys up all the good property and runs small businesses out of town. The only way to stop their aggressive business expansion is for the whole town / city to come together and fight back.
            Last edited by Nyrufa; 08-10-2017, 11:00 AM.

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