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  • Kiths for Hedge Sourcebook?

    The question in this thread is specifically for Machine IV.

    A while ago, I had asked about fan made kiths being put in source books. I believe that you had mentioned that it was a possibility. I am wondering if it is possible for their to be a vote for woodland/hedge focused kiths being put in the Hedge Source book? I REALLY like White Oak Dragon's Venator and would love for that to be in the book.

  • #2
    I also thought I would post some creatures that would make interesting hobgoblins in the Hedge book.
    The Questing Beast, or the Beast Glatisant (Barking Beast), is a monster from Arthurian legend. It is the subject of quests undertaken by famous knights such as King Pellinore, Sir Palamedes, and Sir Percival.
    The strange creature has the head and neck of a snake, the body of a leopard, the haunches of a lion, and the feet of a hart.[1] Its name comes from the great noise that it emits from its belly, a barking like "thirty couple hounds questing". 'Glatisant' is related to the French word glapissant, 'yelping' or 'barking', especially of small dogs or foxes.
    The questing beast is a variant of the mythological medieval view on giraffes, whose generic name of Camelopardalis originated from their description of being half camel and half leopard.
    The first accounts of the beast are in the Perlesvaus and the Post-Vulgate Suite du Merlin. The Post-Vulgate's account, which is taken up in Thomas Malory's Le Morte d'Arthur, has the Questing Beast appear to King Arthur after he has had an affair with his half-sister Morgause and begotten Mordred (they did not know that they were related when the incestuous act occurred).

    Arthur sees the beast drinking from a pool just after he wakes from a disturbing dream that foretells Mordred's destruction of the realm (no noise of hounds from the belly is emitted while it is drinking). He is then approached by King Pellinore who confides that it is his family quest to hunt the beast. Merlin reveals that the Questing Beast had been born of a human woman, a princess who lusted after her own brother. She slept with a devil who had promised to make the boy love her, but the devil manipulated her into accusing her brother of rape. Their father had him torn apart by dogs as punishment. Before he died, however, he prophesied that his sister would give birth to an abomination that would make the same sounds as the pack of dogs that was about to kill him.
    The beast has been taken as a symbol of the incest, violence, and chaos that eventually destroys Arthur's kingdom.

    Mandrakes :According to the legend, when the root is dug up, it screams and kills all who hear it. How about a Mandrake like Hobgoblin that disguises itself as Hobgoblin fruit and emits a scream that will kill the changeling within 24 hours unless healed by some super natural means.

    Basilisk: The basilisk is usually described as a crested snake, and sometimes as a cock with a snake's tail. It is called the king (regulus) of the serpents because its Greek name basiliscus means "little king"; its odor is said to kill snakes. Fire coming from the basilisk's mouth kills birds, and its glance will kill a man. It can kill by hissing, which is why it is also called the sibilus. Like the scorpion it likes dry places; its bite causes the victim to become hydrophobic. A basilisk is hatched from a cock's egg, a rare occurence. Only the weasel can kill a basilisk.
    Some manuscripts have separate entries and/or illustrations for the basilisk and the regulus, possibly because the basilisk account in Isidore has three sections, one each for the basilisk, the "kinglet" (reguli), and the sibilus. Where the regulus is treated separately, the bite of the basilisk causing hydrophobia is generally ascribed to the regulus.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Madhatter View Post
      The question in this thread is specifically for Machine IV.

      A while ago, I had asked about fan made kiths being put in source books. I believe that you had mentioned that it was a possibility. I am wondering if it is possible for their to be a vote for woodland/hedge focused kiths being put in the Hedge Source book? I REALLY like White Oak Dragon's Venator and would love for that to be in the book.
      I'm glad that you liked my kith, and of course I'd love for it to make it into an official book. I think that the Hedge is probably too far along for it to be the book where the vote for fan kiths will appear, though.


      Currently working on: DtD Night Horrors: Enemy Action
      Projects I've contributed to: C20 Anthology of Dreams ("No Such Thing As Dragons")

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      • #4
        There are a few other things I would like to see in the Hedge source book. Fairy tales are full of tales of the fae living in kingdoms under the ocean or villages in lakes and streams. I think it would be fun to explore freeholds that are under water.

        I would also like to see a chapter about changelings who flee into the wilds of the mortal world rather than human civilization or the hedge to escape the True Fae.

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        • #5
          I really like that idea for the Mandrake. Perhaps you could make the scream inflict something like the Cursed Condition from Beast: The Primordial? Or maybe treat it mechanically like a poison?

          As for the kiths, I do hope they might have room to squeeze a few in. That way, I could pitch my Bramblewright kith.


          "My Homebrew Hub"
          Age of Azar
          The Kingdom of Yamatai

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          • #6
            I would also really like to see your Wave Master and Storm Touched in the Hedge book as I also really like those two kiths

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            • #7
              Yeah. Especially since the Wavemaster could really fit in aquatic areas of the Hedge.


              "My Homebrew Hub"
              Age of Azar
              The Kingdom of Yamatai

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Madhatter View Post
                I think it would be fun to explore freeholds that are under water.
                Wouldn't that require drowning thousands of humans?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by milo v3 View Post
                  Wouldn't that require drowning thousands of humans?
                  Perhaps. But if you happen to be of an aquatic kith, or a supernatural being that can survive underwater, it wouldn't be a problem. Then again, the lack of human contact (especially out in the deep) would.be great fodder for a chronicle.


                  "My Homebrew Hub"
                  Age of Azar
                  The Kingdom of Yamatai

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                  • #10
                    Truthfully, I envisioned underwater freeholds being made of kiths which are amphibious or changelings that gained the ability to breath underwater through a contract.

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                    • #11
                      You guys realise freeholds are places in the world like London and Hong Kong not pocket realms right? There'd be tonnes of humans at any freehold unless you try and build it the whole freehold the hedge (in which case you guys are going to probably all be killed/captured/insane within a month) or try and build an actual settlement below water in the realworld in which case you're going to require a ridiculous amount of money and you're not going to be secret from humans for long....

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                      • #12
                        The world is also filled with sunken ships and submerged villages/towns. At Lake Lanier in Georgia, for example, there are several towns at the bottom of the lake. Also, freeholds border the hedge and the mortal world.

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                        • #13
                          I think it would be fun to introduce hobgoblins based on creatures from classics like the Wonderful Wizard of Oz, Alice in Wonderland, and Through the Looking Glass.

                          In L. Frank Baum’s original telling of The Wonderful Wizard of OZ(1900), for example, the winged monkey’s are bound to a golden cap after being cursed by Princess Gayelette for playing a prank of her fiancee, Quelala. The are forced to obey three commands given by anyone who holds/owns the cap. This concept could be introduced in the Hedge Book with the winged monkeys being hobgoblins that will follow three commands given by anyone who holds the token, Golden Cap, which is made of real gold and studded with diamonds and blood rubies.

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                          • #14
                            Other interesting characters reinterpreted as Hobgoblins could be Lewis Caroll’s Bandersnatch in The Hunting of the Snark it has a long neck and snapping jaws, and describe it as ferocious and extraordinarily fast. The Jubjub Bird, which appears in Lewis Carroll’s Jabberwocky and The Hunting of the Snark would also make an interesting hobgoblin. In "Jabberwocky", the only detail given about the bird is that the protagonist should "beware" it. In The Hunting of the Snark, however, the creature is described in much greater depth. It is found in a narrow, dark, depressing and isolated valley. Its voice when heard is described "a scream, shrill and high" like a pencil squeaking on a slate, and significantly scares those who hear it, including the Beaver, who "turns pale to the tip of its tail" Its character traits include that it is "desperate" and "lives in perpetual passion", it "knows any friend it has met once before" and will not "look at a bribe".

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                            • #15
                              Here are some creatures I think would make interesting hobgoblins. The Blemmyes (Latin Blemmyae) was a Nubian tribe which became fictionalized as a race of creatures believed to be acephalous (headless) monsters who had eyes and mouths on their chest. Pliny The Elder writes of them that Blemmyes traduntur capita abesse, ore et oculis pectore adfixis ("It is said that the Blemmyes have no heads, and that their mouth and eyes are put in their chests"). The Blemmyes were said to live in Africa, in Nubia, Kush, or Ethiopia, generally south of Egypt.
                              Some authors derive the story of the Blemmyes from this, that their heads were hid between their shoulders, by hoisting those up to an extravagant height. Samuel Blochart derives the word Blemmyes from two Hebrew terms, one a negation, the other meaning "brain", implying that the Blemmyes were people without brains.

                              The name ‘Blemmyes’ can be found in The Geography of Strabo. This 1 st century Greek geographer describes the Blemmyes not as strange monsters, but as a tribe inhabiting the lower parts of Nubia, along the Nile towards the Red Sea. It is in the work of the Roman writer, Pliny the Elder that we see the Blemmyes of Strabo equated with the headless creatures of Herodotus. In the Natural History , Pliny records that “The Blemmyæ are said to have no heads, their mouths and eyes being seated in their breasts”. It may be pointed out that like Herodotus, Pliny’s knowledge of the Blemmyes is also based on hearsay. Additionally, Pliny’s view of geography is similar to that of Herodotus, in which the edges of the known world are inhabited by strange creatures. For instance, Pliny also wrote about the Himantopodes, “a race of people with feet resembling thongs, upon which they move along by nature with a serpentine, crawling kind of gait”.

                              The Hidebehind is a mysterious nocturnal creature from American folklore. It is said to prey upon humans that wander the woods at night, and was credited for the disappearances of early colonial loggers when they failed to return to camp. Early accounts describe Hidebehinds as large, powerful animals, despite the fact that no one was able to see them.

                              As its name suggests, the Hidebehind is noted for its ability to conceal itself. When an observer attempts to look directly at it, the creature hides again behind an object or the observer and therefore can't be directly seen. The Hidebehind uses this ability to stalk human prey without being observed and to attack without warning. Once the person is killed, Hidebehinds drag them back to their lair to be eaten.

                              Funeral Mountain Terrashot (Funericorpus displosissimum) is bizarre creature from lumberjack folklore of North America in 19th and early 20th centuries. It has casket shaped shell and 6–8ft in length, it also has long and wobbly legs, causing the terrashot to sway uncertainly from side to side and forward and backward as it travels along.

                              The strange beast was first reported by some Mormon emigrants, who observed a peculiar procession entering the desert from a certain mountain range, afterward named the Funeral Mountains. It said that the creature live in little meadows and parks in the higher portions of the range, where it gradually increases in numbers, until by a strange impulse it is seized by a desire to emigrate. Then they go on a disastrous journey across the desert walking in single line. None will ever survive the journey as they cannot take the heat of the sun. Eventually they fall over and explode due to the intense heat and leaving deep, grave-shaped holes in the sand.


                              Slide-Rock Bolter (Macrostoma saxiperrumptus) is a bizarre creature recounted by the lumberjacks of North America during the 19th and early 20th centuries. It is believed to live in the mountains of Colorado, but this beast only lived in the mountains where the slope was more than a 45 degree angle. It has an immense head, with small eyes, and large mouth. It has a fluked tail like a dolphin, with enormous grab-hooks.

                              All day long this creature will just wait for a tourist or helpless creature below it. At the right moment, it will lift its tail, thus loosening its hold on the mountain, and descend rapidly down the slope. With the beast’s mouth wide open it would swallow all that got in its way. Whole parties of tourists are reported to have been gulped up in one scoop by taking parties far back into the hills. Its body is also so large and strong that trees in its path are broken and destroyed. Its own impetus carries it up the next slope, where it again slaps its tail over the ridge and waits.

                              Description and Sightings
                              In the mountains of Colorado, where in summer the wood are becoming infested with tourist, much uneasiness has been caused by the presence of the slide-rock bolter. This frightful animal lives only in the steepest mountain country where the slopes are greater than 45 degrees. It has an immense head, with small eyes, and a mouth somewhat on the order of a sculpin, running back beyond its ears. The tail consist of a divided flipper, with enormous grab-hooks, which it fastens over the crest of the mountain or ridge, often remaining there motionless for days at a time, watching the gulch for tourists or any other hapless creature that may enter it. At the right moment, after sighting a tourist, it will lift its tail, thus loosening its hold on the mountain, and with its small eyes riveted on the poor unfortunate, and drooling thin skid grease from the corners of its mouth, which greatly accelerates its speed, the bolter comes down like a toboggan, scooping in its victim as it goes, its own impetus carrying it up the next slope, where it again slaps its tail over the ridge and waits. Whole parties of tourists are reported to have been gulped at one scoop by taking parties far back into the hills. The animal is a menace not only to tourist but to the woods as well. Many a draw through spruce-covered slopes has been laid low, the trees being knocked out by the roots or mowed off as by a scythe where the bolter has crashed down through from the peaks above. A forest ranger, whose district includes the rough county between Ophir Peaks and the Lizzard Head, conceived the bold idea of decoying a slide-rock bolter to its own destruction. A dummy tourist was rigged up with plaid Norfolk jacket, knee breeches, and a guide book to Colorado. It was then filled full of giant powder and fulminate caps and posted in a conspicuous place, where, sure enough, the next day it attracted the attention of a bolter which had been hanging for days on the slope of Lizzard Head. The resulting explosion flattened half the buildings in Rico, which were never rebuilt, and the surrounding hills fattened flocks of buzzards the rest of the summer.

                              The Snoligoster is a long amphibious creature from lumberjack folklore of North America It dwells in swamps in the south, but it is especially common around Lake Okechobee, Florida. The Snoligoster will eat any meat, but it prefers human flesh. When it catches someone, it will use its tail to toss the unfortunate victim onto the spike on its back (it will store the carcasses on its spike until it is hungry). Once it is ready to eat, it will drill a hole in the ground with it's propeller tail, and scrape the bodies off of it's spike into the hole. It will then proceed to grind the unlucky victims into a pulp, and then inhale and/or drink them. Sometimes the Snoligoster will just use it's tail as a club to batter targets too evasive to stab.

                              The Snoligoster is a large, crocodilian creature. The three unique things about the Snoligoster are the fact that it has no legs (or fins), it has three bony plates on its tail (almost exactly like a propeller), and it has a big spike on its back. The creature just wiggles its tail back and forth, causing the propeller like plates to spin, enabling the creature to move through the dense swamps. Its also is covered in long, thick hair. It is about as long as three normal sized men lying down.

                              Mr. Inman F. Eldredge was hunting a runaway slave in the swamps of Florida. He saw the slave, dead and impaled on what he first thought to be a skinny Cyprus tree. Suddenly, the tree started to walk away. Eldredge then promptly ran away. Even when the public knew about the Snoligoster, they still decided to leave it alone, so that it would be a warning to all the evil-doers and runaway blacks not to hide in the swamps.

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