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Kiths for Hedge Sourcebook?

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  • #31
    Betobeto-San (べとべとさん, Betobeto-San) is a yôkai that follows travellers at night, making the sound "beto beto" with its wooden sandals. It cannot be seen; only heard.

    Betobeto-san is a formless specter, and is only recognizable by the telltale sound it makes – the “beto beto” sound of wooden sandals clacking on the ground.
    People who walk the streets alone at night sometimes encounter this harmless but nonetheless disturbing yokai. It synchronizes its pace with walkers and follows them as long as it can, getting closer and closer with each step. For the victims, this can be quite traumatic. The haunting sound of footsteps follows them wherever they go, but every time they turn around to see what is following them, they find nothing.
    Though Betobeto-san can be quite disconcerting, it is not dangerous. Once someone realizes he or she is being followed by Betobeto-san, simply stepping to the side of the road and saying, “After you, Betobeto-san,” is enough to escape from this yokai. The footsteps will carry on ahead and soon vanish from earshot, allowing the walker to continue in peace.
    In northern Fukui, Betobeto-san which appear during cold winter sleet storms are known as Bishagatsuku. Their name comes from the “bisha bisha” sound their phantom feet make in the slush-filled streets.
    The mangaka Mizuki Shigeru invented a form for this yôkai in one of his works, giving it a round body with a friendly smile.

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    • #32
      The Nurikabe (塗壁 or ぬりかべ, Nurikabe) is a yōkai from Japanese folklore. It manifests as a wall that impedes or misdirects walking travelers at night. Trying to go around is futile as it extends itself forever. Knocking on the lower left part of the wall makes it disappear. It has been suggested that the legend was created to explain travellers losing their bearings on long journeys.

      Little is known about the true appearance of nurikabe because these yokai are usually said to be invisible. During the Edo period, however, artists began to illustrate this creature, giving it an appearance somewhere between a grotesque, fantastic beast and a flat, white wall. Modern representations of the nurikabe depict it as a plain, gray, bipedal wall with vague face-like features.
      Nurikabe appear mysteriously on roads late at night. As a traveler is walking, right before his or her eyes, an enormous, invisible wall materializes and blocks the way. There is no way to slip around this yokai; it extends itself as far as to the left and right as one might try to go. There is no way over it either, nor can it be knocked down. However, it is said that if one taps it near the ground with a stick, it will vanish, allowing the traveler to continue on his or her way.
      The true nature of the nurikabe is surrounded in mystery. Based on its name, it seems to be related to other household spirits known as tsukimogami. It has also been suggested that the nurikabe is simply another manifestation of a shape-shifting itachi or tanuki. Mischievous tanuki are said to enlarge their magical scrotums into an invisible wall in order to play pranks on unsuspecting humans.

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      • #33
        Here are two entities that I think would make interesting hobgoblins.
        The Gulon is a Scandinavian creature that is described as being a creature looking similar to a dog, but with the ears, head, and claws of a cat. The beast supposedly has shaggy brown fur and the tail of a fox. It is also know as the Jerff in Sweden and the Vielfras in Germany. The Gulon is vicious, and is said to kill prey larger than itself and gorge until it can't possibly eat anymore. Then it will push itself in between two trees and pushing out the meal, then returning to eat again.

        The Gulon is used as the symbol for glutton as it stuffs more than it can fill. It's blood has aphrodisiac qualities, and was said to be mixed with honey and served at weddings.
        It is believed that it was first documented Swedish historian Olaus Magnus. Here is how he is described:
        "... great as a great dog, and his ears and face are like a cat's, his feet and nails are very sharp, his body is hairy, with long brown hair, his tail is somewhat shorter, but his hair is thicker and of this they make brave winter caps. Wherefore this creature is the most voracious, for when it finds a carcass, he devours so much that his body, filled by so much meat, is stretched like a drum, and finding a strait passage between trees, he presseth between them, that he may discharge his body by violence, and thus being emptied, he returns to the carcass and fills himself top full.”

        In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, European explorers ventured into the jungles of West Africa and found dozens of undiscovered species like the bongo and the okapi. Along with confirmed species, they also brought back tales of bizarre beasts that they learned of only through African legends or brief glimpses along the shores of steamy jungle rivers.

        There are dozens such creatures, but the dingonek takes the prize as the weirdest of them. Called the "jungle walrus," big game hunter Edgar Beecher Bronson described it as, "fourteen or fifteen feet long, head big as that of a lioness but shaped and marked like a leopard, two long white fangs sticking down straight out of his upper jaw, back broad as a hippo, scaled like an armadillo, but colored and marked like a leopard, and a broad fin tail…Gad! but he was a hideous old haunter of a nightmare, was that beast-fish…Blast that blighter's fangs, but they looked long enough to go clean through a man." A shot with a .303 caliber rifle only angered it.
        It is said to be a carnivore that can choose to hunt or devour nearly whatever it wants save for elephants. This is because of it having tusks that are over a metre long and being so large, ferocious and aggressive that even large bull hippos fall prey to it. How it would presumable do this is by ambushing hippos by sneaking up on them then sinking its metre long tusks into the thick skin of the hippo as if it were just jelly.

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        • #34
          Here is another monster that would make an interesting hobgoblin.
          Morag or Mòrag (Scottish Gaelic) is a loch monster reported to live in Loch Morar, Scotland. After, Nessie, it is the best known of Scotlands legendary monsters.

          The name "Morag" is a pun on the name of the Loch, and of the Scottish female name, "Morag". Sightings date back to 1887, and include some 34 incidents as of 1981. Sixteen of these involved multiple witnesses.
          In 1948 "a peculiar serpent-like creature about 20 ft long" was reported by nine people in a boat, in the same place as the 1887 sighting.The best known encounter, in 1969, featured two men, Duncan McDonnel and William Simpson, and their speedboat, with which they accidentally struck the creature, prompting it to hit back. McDonnel retaliated with an oar, and Simpson opened fire with his rifle, whereupon it sank slowly out of sight. They described it as being brown, 25-30 feet long, and with rough skin. It had three humps rising 18 inches (460 mm) above the loch's surface, and a head a foot wide, held 18 inches (460 mm) out of the water.
          A pair of photographs taken in 1977 by Miss M Lindsay show an object in the loch which is claimed to be Morag. The object appears to have moved several yards from one picture to the other. The first picture shows a round back, while the second picture seems to show two humps.
          The Loch Ness Investigation Bureau expanded its search to include Loch Morar in February 1970. Several expeditions with the aim to prove or find the monster have been made, but no evidence for an unknown, large creature has been found.

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          • #35
            Dobhar-chú is a giant carnivorous river monster that lives in Ireland. It is said Dobhar-chú is a mix between a beaver and a dog, but many people have said that maybe this creature is a primitive beaver. However, the most consistent ancient description is of a great otter. Dobhar-chú's other names are, Doyarchu the traditional alias, Dobarcu, Dhuragoo, Sea Dog, or Irish-Gator.

            Dobhar-chú is reported to have lived for a long time, since ancient Ireland, and they are very aggressive to humans and dogs, they usually attack in groups or maybe two Dobhar-chús, so one will attack first then, if it becomes tired, the friends may come to help, then they will drag their victim into water, but if the enemy runs away, they will follow it until it is caught. But, modern day, Dobhar-chú are very rare or maybe extinct, but it is reported Dobhar-chú can be found in Achill Island, west of County Mayo. In this island there is a lake named Sraheens Lough. Dobhar-chú are said to live there for now, the first modern sighting noted in 'A Description of West Connaught'(1684) by Roderick O'Flaherty. Another story in 2003 by Ireland artist Sean Corcoran and his wife on a Dobhar-chú in Omey Island, Connemara. They reportedly saw a giant creature with dark colouring, and membranes on the feet to swim. There is, interestingly, an archeological remain called Kinlough Stone that is the gravestone of a woman who was killed by a Dobhar-chú in the 17th century. Her name was Gráinne. Another piece of proof is the Glenade Stone, found in a Cornwall graveyard, where there is a Dobhar-chú figure painted above the grave.

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            • #36
              We wouldn't include fan-made kiths per se. Kiths in future books will be written by paid writers working on those specific books. However, if you're proud of your kith work, you should submit some of it as a writing sample! We work with lots of new writers.


              Rose Bailey
              Onyx Path Development Producer
              Cavaliers of Mars Creator | Chronicles of Darkness Lead Developer

              Retired as forum administrator. Please direct inquiries to the Contact Us link.

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              • #37
                They are not kiths I made, but there were several kiths I enjoyed introduced in this forum. Also, MachineIV mentioned that there was a chance in which fan made kiths could be introduced in future books.

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                • #38
                  Then encourage those fans to submit! Always great when players become pros.

                  Also, as to the specific Hedge thing, it's worth noting that we've got one or two projects specifically related to kiths at the concept stage, so I'm not sure whether we'll be doing any in other supplements. Right now, we're focusing on getting the core and anthology finished, and planning the (potential) Kickstarter. (And obviously, if we do a KS, it'll have a huge impact on what the supplement plan looks like!) One way or another, I hope to have a lot of example kiths in publication.

                  EDIT: The reason I clarified that any kiths (or anything else) will be done paid and under contract is that I want to make sure anybody whose work we use commercially gets fairly compensated for it. As I said, I like seeing fans turn pro, so it's important to me to do things properly. Since he's outspoken on the need for good conditions for writers, I'm sure this is what David meant when he made the comment you're referring to.
                  Last edited by Rose Bailey; 01-05-2017, 05:00 PM.


                  Rose Bailey
                  Onyx Path Development Producer
                  Cavaliers of Mars Creator | Chronicles of Darkness Lead Developer

                  Retired as forum administrator. Please direct inquiries to the Contact Us link.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Madhatter View Post
                    Dobhar-chú is a giant carnivorous river monster that lives in Ireland. It is said Dobhar-chú is a mix between a beaver and a dog, but many people have said that maybe this creature is a primitive beaver. However, the most consistent ancient description is of a great otter.
                    Wow, never heard of this guy thanks!

                    In modern Irish Dobhar-Chú is just the posh word for otter, Madra Uisce being the everyday word.

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Rose Bailey View Post
                      Then encourage those fans to submit! Always great when players become pros.

                      Also, as to the specific Hedge thing, it's worth noting that we've got one or two projects specifically related to kiths at the concept stage, so I'm not sure whether we'll be doing any in other supplements. Right now, we're focusing on getting the core and anthology finished, and planning the (potential) Kickstarter. (And obviously, if we do a KS, it'll have a huge impact on what the supplement plan looks like!) One way or another, I hope to have a lot of example kiths in publication.

                      EDIT: The reason I clarified that any kiths (or anything else) will be done paid and under contract is that I want to make sure anybody whose work we use commercially gets fairly compensated for it. As I said, I like seeing fans turn pro, so it's important to me to do things properly. Since he's outspoken on the need for good conditions for writers, I'm sure this is what David meant when he made the comment you're referring to.
                      Than May I recommend White Oak Dragon's Venator and Deionscribe's Bramblewright? I really like these two kiths and they are geared toward players that focus on the hedge.
                      Venator By White Oak Dragon
                      Shut up! Don't you hear that howl? That's a briarwolf, and they don't travel alone.

                      The Hedge is a place of great peril as well as wonder, and the odd creatures called hobgoblins are among the greatest dangers a changeling might face, outside of the Gentry and the Huntsmen themselves. Whether he faced them in arenas surrounded by scores of gaping Fae spectators or patrolled the Hedge borders to rid his Keeper's lands of dangerous pests, it was the Venator's task to tame or slay these bizarre beasts. An escaped Venator often becomes a valued Hedge guide or guardian for the freehold that earns his loyalty.

                      • Elemental: A bronze helmet encrusted with verdigris sits atop her body made of thick studded leather.
                      • Grimm: The pale scars covering the sun-tanned skin of his muscular body recounts his past victories and the legends of the creatures that he's slain.
                      • Ogre: The skull of a great beast sits upon his head, his own tusks barely visible beneath it.
                      • Wizened: His oddly formed body has been enhanced with the bones of his previous conquests, with furs stitched over his skin.

                      Blessing: A Venator is skilled at hunting, slaying, and taming the wild hobgoblins of the Hedge. He gains the Interdisciplinary Specialty (Bestial Hobgoblins) Merit for free, and gains an exceptional success on three successes rather than five on any roll that benefits from it. Additionally, if the Venator successfully renders a Hedgebeast completely helpless without killing it, he may spend a point of Glamour to make it into a temporary Fae Mount or Hedgebeast Companion as per the Merits for a number of days equal to his Wyrd. This can be extended by spending additional points of Glamour for each additional day that he wishes to maintain the bond. The Venator may only have a number of hobgoblins bonded to him in this way equal to the lower of his Presence or Composure, although permanent instances of the Merits do not count against this total. He also cannot apply this blessing to the more humanoid hobs.

                      Bramblewright By Deionscribe

                      "It's been quiet, so far. But my friends in the trods are on the lookout, just in case."

                      While all changelings make use of the Hedge to varying degrees, those made into Bramblewrights had a special affinity for it. These Lost were made to impose their Keepers' will upon the Hedge which bordered their realms, warping it according to their ever-changing desires. Upon choosing to escape, though, their ability to shape this psychoreactive realm proved crucial to their success.

                      • Elemental: Twisting coils of thorny vines compose her body, but a small horror nesting in the hollow of her heart is unique to each observer.
                      • Fairest: The androgynous figure is unquestionably beautiful, but his or her features are an amalgam of everyone who ever broke your heart.
                      • Grimm: Ever-changing lines of text on his skin recount to onlookers the most painful moments in their lives.

                      Blessing: The Bramblewright gains the Master Shaper Merit at three dots, and a dot of Empathy that can take her beyond the limits of her Wyrd. She also takes no penalties to rolls for warping the Hedge, and reduces the target number of successes for warping the Hedge by her Wyrd, to a minimum of one. When she chooses to infuse objects or spaces with emotion, she needs to have invested at least [25 - Wyrd] successes.

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by An Fhuiseog View Post
                        Wow, never heard of this guy thanks!

                        In modern Irish Dobhar-Chú is just the posh word for otter, Madra Uisce being the everyday word.
                        I am glad you like them. It is my hope that some of the cryptids/monsters on this thread will be used as hobgoblins in the Hedge Source book.

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Rose Bailey View Post
                          Then encourage those fans to submit! Always great when players become pros.

                          Also, as to the specific Hedge thing, it's worth noting that we've got one or two projects specifically related to kiths at the concept stage, so I'm not sure whether we'll be doing any in other supplements. Right now, we're focusing on getting the core and anthology finished, and planning the (potential) Kickstarter. (And obviously, if we do a KS, it'll have a huge impact on what the supplement plan looks like!) One way or another, I hope to have a lot of example kiths in publication.

                          EDIT: The reason I clarified that any kiths (or anything else) will be done paid and under contract is that I want to make sure anybody whose work we use commercially gets fairly compensated for it. As I said, I like seeing fans turn pro, so it's important to me to do things properly. Since he's outspoken on the need for good conditions for writers, I'm sure this is what David meant when he made the comment you're referring to.
                          Please, please, please, do the Kickstarter, I know you have clout at Onyx Path, so please, pleased, please do that Changeling kickstarter !

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