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  • #31
    Betobeto-San (べとべとさん, Betobeto-San) is a yôkai that follows travellers at night, making the sound "beto beto" with its wooden sandals. It cannot be seen; only heard.

    Betobeto-san is a formless specter, and is only recognizable by the telltale sound it makes – the “beto beto” sound of wooden sandals clacking on the ground.
    People who walk the streets alone at night sometimes encounter this harmless but nonetheless disturbing yokai. It synchronizes its pace with walkers and follows them as long as it can, getting closer and closer with each step. For the victims, this can be quite traumatic. The haunting sound of footsteps follows them wherever they go, but every time they turn around to see what is following them, they find nothing.
    Though Betobeto-san can be quite disconcerting, it is not dangerous. Once someone realizes he or she is being followed by Betobeto-san, simply stepping to the side of the road and saying, “After you, Betobeto-san,” is enough to escape from this yokai. The footsteps will carry on ahead and soon vanish from earshot, allowing the walker to continue in peace.
    In northern Fukui, Betobeto-san which appear during cold winter sleet storms are known as Bishagatsuku. Their name comes from the “bisha bisha” sound their phantom feet make in the slush-filled streets.
    The mangaka Mizuki Shigeru invented a form for this yôkai in one of his works, giving it a round body with a friendly smile.

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    • #32
      The Nurikabe (塗壁 or ぬりかべ, Nurikabe) is a yōkai from Japanese folklore. It manifests as a wall that impedes or misdirects walking travelers at night. Trying to go around is futile as it extends itself forever. Knocking on the lower left part of the wall makes it disappear. It has been suggested that the legend was created to explain travellers losing their bearings on long journeys.

      Little is known about the true appearance of nurikabe because these yokai are usually said to be invisible. During the Edo period, however, artists began to illustrate this creature, giving it an appearance somewhere between a grotesque, fantastic beast and a flat, white wall. Modern representations of the nurikabe depict it as a plain, gray, bipedal wall with vague face-like features.
      Nurikabe appear mysteriously on roads late at night. As a traveler is walking, right before his or her eyes, an enormous, invisible wall materializes and blocks the way. There is no way to slip around this yokai; it extends itself as far as to the left and right as one might try to go. There is no way over it either, nor can it be knocked down. However, it is said that if one taps it near the ground with a stick, it will vanish, allowing the traveler to continue on his or her way.
      The true nature of the nurikabe is surrounded in mystery. Based on its name, it seems to be related to other household spirits known as tsukimogami. It has also been suggested that the nurikabe is simply another manifestation of a shape-shifting itachi or tanuki. Mischievous tanuki are said to enlarge their magical scrotums into an invisible wall in order to play pranks on unsuspecting humans.

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      • #33
        Here are two entities that I think would make interesting hobgoblins.
        The Gulon is a Scandinavian creature that is described as being a creature looking similar to a dog, but with the ears, head, and claws of a cat. The beast supposedly has shaggy brown fur and the tail of a fox. It is also know as the Jerff in Sweden and the Vielfras in Germany. The Gulon is vicious, and is said to kill prey larger than itself and gorge until it can't possibly eat anymore. Then it will push itself in between two trees and pushing out the meal, then returning to eat again.

        The Gulon is used as the symbol for glutton as it stuffs more than it can fill. It's blood has aphrodisiac qualities, and was said to be mixed with honey and served at weddings.
        It is believed that it was first documented Swedish historian Olaus Magnus. Here is how he is described:
        "... great as a great dog, and his ears and face are like a cat's, his feet and nails are very sharp, his body is hairy, with long brown hair, his tail is somewhat shorter, but his hair is thicker and of this they make brave winter caps. Wherefore this creature is the most voracious, for when it finds a carcass, he devours so much that his body, filled by so much meat, is stretched like a drum, and finding a strait passage between trees, he presseth between them, that he may discharge his body by violence, and thus being emptied, he returns to the carcass and fills himself top full.”

        In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, European explorers ventured into the jungles of West Africa and found dozens of undiscovered species like the bongo and the okapi. Along with confirmed species, they also brought back tales of bizarre beasts that they learned of only through African legends or brief glimpses along the shores of steamy jungle rivers.

        There are dozens such creatures, but the dingonek takes the prize as the weirdest of them. Called the "jungle walrus," big game hunter Edgar Beecher Bronson described it as, "fourteen or fifteen feet long, head big as that of a lioness but shaped and marked like a leopard, two long white fangs sticking down straight out of his upper jaw, back broad as a hippo, scaled like an armadillo, but colored and marked like a leopard, and a broad fin tail…Gad! but he was a hideous old haunter of a nightmare, was that beast-fish…Blast that blighter's fangs, but they looked long enough to go clean through a man." A shot with a .303 caliber rifle only angered it.
        It is said to be a carnivore that can choose to hunt or devour nearly whatever it wants save for elephants. This is because of it having tusks that are over a metre long and being so large, ferocious and aggressive that even large bull hippos fall prey to it. How it would presumable do this is by ambushing hippos by sneaking up on them then sinking its metre long tusks into the thick skin of the hippo as if it were just jelly.

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        • #34
          Here is another monster that would make an interesting hobgoblin.
          Morag or Mòrag (Scottish Gaelic) is a loch monster reported to live in Loch Morar, Scotland. After, Nessie, it is the best known of Scotlands legendary monsters.

          The name "Morag" is a pun on the name of the Loch, and of the Scottish female name, "Morag". Sightings date back to 1887, and include some 34 incidents as of 1981. Sixteen of these involved multiple witnesses.
          In 1948 "a peculiar serpent-like creature about 20 ft long" was reported by nine people in a boat, in the same place as the 1887 sighting.The best known encounter, in 1969, featured two men, Duncan McDonnel and William Simpson, and their speedboat, with which they accidentally struck the creature, prompting it to hit back. McDonnel retaliated with an oar, and Simpson opened fire with his rifle, whereupon it sank slowly out of sight. They described it as being brown, 25-30 feet long, and with rough skin. It had three humps rising 18 inches (460 mm) above the loch's surface, and a head a foot wide, held 18 inches (460 mm) out of the water.
          A pair of photographs taken in 1977 by Miss M Lindsay show an object in the loch which is claimed to be Morag. The object appears to have moved several yards from one picture to the other. The first picture shows a round back, while the second picture seems to show two humps.
          The Loch Ness Investigation Bureau expanded its search to include Loch Morar in February 1970. Several expeditions with the aim to prove or find the monster have been made, but no evidence for an unknown, large creature has been found.

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          • #35
            Dobhar-chú is a giant carnivorous river monster that lives in Ireland. It is said Dobhar-chú is a mix between a beaver and a dog, but many people have said that maybe this creature is a primitive beaver. However, the most consistent ancient description is of a great otter. Dobhar-chú's other names are, Doyarchu the traditional alias, Dobarcu, Dhuragoo, Sea Dog, or Irish-Gator.

            Dobhar-chú is reported to have lived for a long time, since ancient Ireland, and they are very aggressive to humans and dogs, they usually attack in groups or maybe two Dobhar-chús, so one will attack first then, if it becomes tired, the friends may come to help, then they will drag their victim into water, but if the enemy runs away, they will follow it until it is caught. But, modern day, Dobhar-chú are very rare or maybe extinct, but it is reported Dobhar-chú can be found in Achill Island, west of County Mayo. In this island there is a lake named Sraheens Lough. Dobhar-chú are said to live there for now, the first modern sighting noted in 'A Description of West Connaught'(1684) by Roderick O'Flaherty. Another story in 2003 by Ireland artist Sean Corcoran and his wife on a Dobhar-chú in Omey Island, Connemara. They reportedly saw a giant creature with dark colouring, and membranes on the feet to swim. There is, interestingly, an archeological remain called Kinlough Stone that is the gravestone of a woman who was killed by a Dobhar-chú in the 17th century. Her name was Gráinne. Another piece of proof is the Glenade Stone, found in a Cornwall graveyard, where there is a Dobhar-chú figure painted above the grave.

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            • #36
              We wouldn't include fan-made kiths per se. Kiths in future books will be written by paid writers working on those specific books. However, if you're proud of your kith work, you should submit some of it as a writing sample! We work with lots of new writers.


              Rose Bailey
              Onyx Path Development Producer
              Cavaliers of Mars Creator | Chronicles of Darkness Lead Developer

              Retired as forum administrator. Please direct inquiries to the Contact Us link.

              Comment


              • #37
                They are not kiths I made, but there were several kiths I enjoyed introduced in this forum. Also, MachineIV mentioned that there was a chance in which fan made kiths could be introduced in future books.

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                • #38
                  Then encourage those fans to submit! Always great when players become pros.

                  Also, as to the specific Hedge thing, it's worth noting that we've got one or two projects specifically related to kiths at the concept stage, so I'm not sure whether we'll be doing any in other supplements. Right now, we're focusing on getting the core and anthology finished, and planning the (potential) Kickstarter. (And obviously, if we do a KS, it'll have a huge impact on what the supplement plan looks like!) One way or another, I hope to have a lot of example kiths in publication.

                  EDIT: The reason I clarified that any kiths (or anything else) will be done paid and under contract is that I want to make sure anybody whose work we use commercially gets fairly compensated for it. As I said, I like seeing fans turn pro, so it's important to me to do things properly. Since he's outspoken on the need for good conditions for writers, I'm sure this is what David meant when he made the comment you're referring to.
                  Last edited by Rose Bailey; 01-05-2017, 05:00 PM.


                  Rose Bailey
                  Onyx Path Development Producer
                  Cavaliers of Mars Creator | Chronicles of Darkness Lead Developer

                  Retired as forum administrator. Please direct inquiries to the Contact Us link.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Madhatter View Post
                    Dobhar-chú is a giant carnivorous river monster that lives in Ireland. It is said Dobhar-chú is a mix between a beaver and a dog, but many people have said that maybe this creature is a primitive beaver. However, the most consistent ancient description is of a great otter.
                    Wow, never heard of this guy thanks!

                    In modern Irish Dobhar-Chú is just the posh word for otter, Madra Uisce being the everyday word.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Rose Bailey View Post
                      Then encourage those fans to submit! Always great when players become pros.

                      Also, as to the specific Hedge thing, it's worth noting that we've got one or two projects specifically related to kiths at the concept stage, so I'm not sure whether we'll be doing any in other supplements. Right now, we're focusing on getting the core and anthology finished, and planning the (potential) Kickstarter. (And obviously, if we do a KS, it'll have a huge impact on what the supplement plan looks like!) One way or another, I hope to have a lot of example kiths in publication.

                      EDIT: The reason I clarified that any kiths (or anything else) will be done paid and under contract is that I want to make sure anybody whose work we use commercially gets fairly compensated for it. As I said, I like seeing fans turn pro, so it's important to me to do things properly. Since he's outspoken on the need for good conditions for writers, I'm sure this is what David meant when he made the comment you're referring to.
                      Than May I recommend White Oak Dragon's Venator and Deionscribe's Bramblewright? I really like these two kiths and they are geared toward players that focus on the hedge.
                      Venator By White Oak Dragon
                      Shut up! Don't you hear that howl? That's a briarwolf, and they don't travel alone.

                      The Hedge is a place of great peril as well as wonder, and the odd creatures called hobgoblins are among the greatest dangers a changeling might face, outside of the Gentry and the Huntsmen themselves. Whether he faced them in arenas surrounded by scores of gaping Fae spectators or patrolled the Hedge borders to rid his Keeper's lands of dangerous pests, it was the Venator's task to tame or slay these bizarre beasts. An escaped Venator often becomes a valued Hedge guide or guardian for the freehold that earns his loyalty.

                      • Elemental: A bronze helmet encrusted with verdigris sits atop her body made of thick studded leather.
                      • Grimm: The pale scars covering the sun-tanned skin of his muscular body recounts his past victories and the legends of the creatures that he's slain.
                      • Ogre: The skull of a great beast sits upon his head, his own tusks barely visible beneath it.
                      • Wizened: His oddly formed body has been enhanced with the bones of his previous conquests, with furs stitched over his skin.

                      Blessing: A Venator is skilled at hunting, slaying, and taming the wild hobgoblins of the Hedge. He gains the Interdisciplinary Specialty (Bestial Hobgoblins) Merit for free, and gains an exceptional success on three successes rather than five on any roll that benefits from it. Additionally, if the Venator successfully renders a Hedgebeast completely helpless without killing it, he may spend a point of Glamour to make it into a temporary Fae Mount or Hedgebeast Companion as per the Merits for a number of days equal to his Wyrd. This can be extended by spending additional points of Glamour for each additional day that he wishes to maintain the bond. The Venator may only have a number of hobgoblins bonded to him in this way equal to the lower of his Presence or Composure, although permanent instances of the Merits do not count against this total. He also cannot apply this blessing to the more humanoid hobs.

                      Bramblewright By Deionscribe

                      "It's been quiet, so far. But my friends in the trods are on the lookout, just in case."

                      While all changelings make use of the Hedge to varying degrees, those made into Bramblewrights had a special affinity for it. These Lost were made to impose their Keepers' will upon the Hedge which bordered their realms, warping it according to their ever-changing desires. Upon choosing to escape, though, their ability to shape this psychoreactive realm proved crucial to their success.

                      • Elemental: Twisting coils of thorny vines compose her body, but a small horror nesting in the hollow of her heart is unique to each observer.
                      • Fairest: The androgynous figure is unquestionably beautiful, but his or her features are an amalgam of everyone who ever broke your heart.
                      • Grimm: Ever-changing lines of text on his skin recount to onlookers the most painful moments in their lives.

                      Blessing: The Bramblewright gains the Master Shaper Merit at three dots, and a dot of Empathy that can take her beyond the limits of her Wyrd. She also takes no penalties to rolls for warping the Hedge, and reduces the target number of successes for warping the Hedge by her Wyrd, to a minimum of one. When she chooses to infuse objects or spaces with emotion, she needs to have invested at least [25 - Wyrd] successes.

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by An Fhuiseog View Post
                        Wow, never heard of this guy thanks!

                        In modern Irish Dobhar-Chú is just the posh word for otter, Madra Uisce being the everyday word.
                        I am glad you like them. It is my hope that some of the cryptids/monsters on this thread will be used as hobgoblins in the Hedge Source book.

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Rose Bailey View Post
                          Then encourage those fans to submit! Always great when players become pros.

                          Also, as to the specific Hedge thing, it's worth noting that we've got one or two projects specifically related to kiths at the concept stage, so I'm not sure whether we'll be doing any in other supplements. Right now, we're focusing on getting the core and anthology finished, and planning the (potential) Kickstarter. (And obviously, if we do a KS, it'll have a huge impact on what the supplement plan looks like!) One way or another, I hope to have a lot of example kiths in publication.

                          EDIT: The reason I clarified that any kiths (or anything else) will be done paid and under contract is that I want to make sure anybody whose work we use commercially gets fairly compensated for it. As I said, I like seeing fans turn pro, so it's important to me to do things properly. Since he's outspoken on the need for good conditions for writers, I'm sure this is what David meant when he made the comment you're referring to.
                          Please, please, please, do the Kickstarter, I know you have clout at Onyx Path, so please, pleased, please do that Changeling kickstarter !

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                          • #43
                            It has been a while since I uploaded some crypts for inspirations on hobgoblins. White Oak Dragon, here are some fearsome critters I hope you enjoy. The Gumberoo (Megalogaster repercussus) is a fearsome critters told by the lumberjacks of emerging America in the 19th and early 20th centuries. The gumberoo is dangerous to humans, and therefore classified as a monster by the Bureau of Monster Affairs.

                            The Gumberoo is said to look like a fat bear in shape but completely hairless except for its prominent eyebrows and bristly hairs on its chin. Instead it has dark, smooth, and extremely tough leather-like skin. This makes the beast invulnerable to bullets and arrows. Anything shot at the beast, simply bounced off. Its weakness was fire and was the only known way to defeat it.

                            Gumberoo was also said to always be hungry and devoured anything it can find that looked like food. A whole horse may be eaten at one sitting, but its not enough.

                            Gumberoos make their dens in the bases of huge, burned-out cedar trees. The creature spends most of its time in a state of hibernation, only leaving its lair a few times a year to search for food. When active, the gumberoo is always hungry and will eat any living creature that crosses its path.

                            The first confirmed kill of a gumberoo by an M-Force agent occurred in 1957, when Mike Mulligan and Abernathy Quinn destroyed a gumberoo near Coos Bay, Oregon. There have been numerous reports of gumberoos since then, but only five confirmed sightings and no successful kills.

                            The Axehandle Hound (sometimes spelled as axhandle hound, ax-handle hound, or similar) is a fearsome dog originated from Wisconsin and Minnesota, it has a slender body in the shape of a handle of an axe and a head the shape of an axe head. It also has short stubby legs.

                            Despite its dangerously shaped head, the Axehandle Hound was not known to be deadly. However it would pester lumberjacks by stealing any axe handles left unattended and storing them away to be eaten. This nocturnal creature travels from camp to camp searching for its next meal. In Minnesota, there is a canoe-access campground named Ax-Handle Hound after the folklore creature. It can be found on the Little Fork River near Voyageurs National Park and very near the town of Linden Grove.
                            The Snallygaster is a mythical dragon-like beast said to inhabit the hills surrounding Washington and Frederick Counties, Maryland.The area was settled by German immigrants beginning in the 1730s. Early accounts describe the community being terrorized by a monster called a Schneller Geist, meaning "quick spirit" in German. The earliest incarnations mixed the half-bird features of a siren with the nightmarish features of demons and ghouls. The Snallygaster was described as half-reptile, half-bird with a metallic beak lined with razor-sharp teeth, occasionally with octopus-like tentacles. It swoops silently from the sky to pick up and carry off its victims. The earliest stories claim that this monster sucked the blood of its victims. Seven-pointed stars, which reputedly kept the Snallygaster at bay, can still be seen painted on local barns. It has been suggested the legend was resurrected in the 19th century to frighten freed slaves. Newspaper accounts throughout February and March 1909 describe encounters between local residents and a beast with "enormous wings, a long pointed bill, claws like steel hooks, and an eye in the center of its forehead." It was described as making screeches "like a locomotive whistle.”

                            A great deal of publicity surrounded this string of appearances, with the Smithsonian Institution offering a reward for the hide. U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt reportedly considered postponing an African safari to personally hunt the beast. In 2008, author Patrick Boyton published a book about the history of the Snallygaster entitled Snallygaster: The Lost Legend of Frederick County. The Snallygaster has one widely known enemy, called Dewayo. The Dewayo is reported to be a mammalian biped with features similar to a wolf, but the stance and stature of a human. The sightings of Dewayo are primarily reported in West Middletown, Maryland, but sightings have also been reported in the Wolfsville, Maryland region. The Dewayo and the Snallygaster have reportedly had vicious encounters dating back to early settlement of the Middletown valley.

                            The Squonk is a mythical creature reputed to live in the Hemlock forest of northern Pennsylvania. Legends of Squonks probably originated in the late nineteenth century, at the height of Pennsylvania's importance in the timber industry.

                            The earliest known written account of Squonks comes from a book by William T. Cox called Fearsome Critters of the Lumberwoods, With a Few Desert and Mountain Beasts.

                            The legend holds that the creatures skin is ill fitting, being covered with warts and that, because it is ashamed of its appearance it hides from plain sight, and spends most of its time weeping. Hunters who have tried catching squonks have found out the creature is capable of dissolving completely into a pool of tears and bubbles when cornered. A man named J.T Wentling is supposed to have coaxed the creature into a bag, of which when he carried it home it suddenly lightened. Upon further inspection he found that all that remained was the liquid remains of the sad animal.
                            The scientific name of the squonk "Lacrimacorpus dissolvens" comes from the Latin words meaning tear, body, and dissolve.

                            Humility is a bird from the folklore of the American lumberjacks. It was reported in Reverend Samuel Peter’s General History of Connecticut in 1781. This bird was much like an eagle but its eyes were far superior and was so swift that it always avoided every hunter's shot.

                            The Cactus cat is a mythical creature and fearsome critter that has been reported in the American Southwest. It's described as a bobcat-like animal with thorn-like fur, sharp bones protruding from its front legs and a branched tail. The Cactus Cat has been sighted in the Southwestern
                            desert, in states such as California, Nevada and New Mexico.

                            Cowboys and pioneers of the nineteenth century reported these strange beasts coming out at night, slashing open cacti and drinking the exposed sap. This caused the cats to enter an intoxicated state, stumbling around and rarely attacking travelers. Attacks by these strange varmint, though considered rare, did happen from time to time, with many frontiersmen waking up to find welts on their body from the cat's barbed tail. Despite these attacks, the Cactus Cat was not considered an aggressive creature (except toward cacti). The critter was also known to have a unique and haunting "wail" that could be heard at night through the darkened desert, along with the dry sound of its bones rubbing together.
                            The story of the Cactus Cat is probably fueled by numerous cases of misidentification, most likely being a bobcat, mountain lion or porcupine. The cat's "wail" may have also been that of a puma. It is also likely that the affable Cactus Cat was never believed to exist and, like most Fearsome Critters, was a product of a few bored woodsmen on a warm desert night.

                            The Dingmaul (Saxicatellus vociferens), Ding Maul, Ding Ball or Plunkus was a giant cat that sat in a giant rock in California, that was nicknamed Dingmaul Rock. The dingmauls have wolf-like skin and a sad expression in their face. They have viscous bodies and they have been seen spitting on a rock studying the dirt. They have a long tail that is half of their body length. They use the tail to scare flies away and produce splinters to fill their nests or burrows. The male hits himself in the breast with his tail to attract the female and mate. The female also has a ball that is darker than the male.

                            The dingmaul is famous in the White Mountains; in fact, above the timber line extending in the hill that is between the Mt. Adams and the Mt. Jefferson of Presidential Range is a very visible rock, that was called Dingmaul Rock.

                            There are two species of Dingmauls: the Northwest and the Californian.

                            The Averasboro Gallinipper is a giant mosquito reportedly as large as a hawk. The sting it carries on its head could slice all the way through a man's arm. A bite from the Gallinipper could mean death. The mosquito could drain all the blood from a man in a single gulp.

                            More than the alligators, more than the bears, more than the panthers that hid in the trees, the lumbermen who worked the swamps of North Carolina feared the Gallinipper.

                            The legend of the Gallinipper originates around the now abandoned town of Averasboro, however, many coastal towns in North Carolina have similar versions of the story, including the state's oldest town, Bath. The earliest accounts of a giant mosquito come from the local American Indian traditional mythology.Only a cemetery surrounded by a grove and a Civil War museum remind anyone passing through that the port town of Averasboro existed. According to Monsters of North Carolina by John Hairr, "The town's property records of the 1850s reveal that thirteen of the fourteen public buildings in the town sold liquor...According to tradition, one of the town's taverns had the skeleton of what looked like a large flying animal suspended from the ceiling, its bones carefully wired together in a job that would have made many a museum curator proud. The skeleton had originally belonged to a large bird, perhaps a tundra wan, Cygnus columbianus, which the proprietor or one of his friends had killed on a hunting excursion to the Outer Banks. Someone had removed the beak from the skeleton and replaced it with a long, scrimshawed piece of bone that tapered to a point like a large needle. Around the neck of the trophy hung a wooden plank upon which someone had roughly inscribed the words 'Averasboro Gallinipper.' This trophy was meant to remind visitors that swarms of...mosquitoes so large they were mistaken for birds." Belief in large mosquitoes was so widespread that the wormken cutting timber along the Cape Fear kept a wary eye out for the creatures (Hairr).”

                            The Carolina Cherokee have a version of the Tuscarora Ro-Tay-Yo myth, however, in their version, the
                            creature is a giant yellow-jacket wasp called U'la'gu'. The Cherokee stated that U'la'gu was large enough to swoop down and pick up children and carry them back to its lair, a cave in western North Carolina called Tsgagnun'yi, meaning "where the Yellow-jacket was." James Mooney wrote of the legend, stating, "The hunters built fires around the whole, so that smoke filled the cave and smothered the great insect and multitudes of the smaller ones...escaped and increased until now yellow-jackets, which before were unknown, are all over the world (Hairr)." In both the Tuscarora and Cherokee stories, smaller modern insects were created when the giant one was killed.

                            In 1855, a lumberworker named Red Saunders was reportedly stung by a Gallinipper. However, some versions of the story claim the the giant mosquito bite was actually caused by a hot coal. Irish immigrants to the Cape Fear region are also reported to have seen giant mosquitoes in the 1850s.

                            The Glawackus is a creature seen in Glastonbury, CT and Frizzelburg, MA and is in the traditions of lumberjacks. In the latter incident it is reported to have attacked livestock. It is said to have a strong resemblance to a mix between a bear, panther, and lion. An eyewitness report states that "I was working as a young reporter on the Hartford Courant that year when World War II was in the wings. But we were preoccupied with the developing story about this Glastonbury creature that howled at night, slipped in and out of view and caused dogs, cats and small farm animals to disappear. As the sightings grew in number, so did the variety of descriptions. First it was a huge cat. Then some people reported what looked like a dog in back and a cat in front. Others saw it vice-versa. One man called to say he had seen a big animal in the pitch dark with eyes that glowed like embers. It was clear to us that this weird, unknown animal needed a name. One editor coined the word, Glawackus. "Gla" for Glastonbury; "wack" for wacky; and "us" as a proper Latin ending. It caught on like magic." A safari was organized with 2 Ozark trained hounds, but was unsuccessful.

                            The Gee-Gee Bird is a strange bird reported to live in North America. It was described by the soldiers of World War II who were positioned in Alaska. Although never seen, the bird could be heard making a strange noise as it flew by. It made the sound “Gee-gee-geezus-its-cold”, hence the name Gee-Gee Bird.

                            Rubberado are strange creatures of Wisconsin and Minnesota told by the lumberjacks of the 19th and early 20th centuries. This creature was a porcupine whose spines and flesh were extremely rubbery. It used this ability to bounce across the land. Once the Rubberado was cooked, its flesh became inedible. Apparently, bullets bounced off of its flesh meaning I could be armored and every time it bounced, it laughed.

                            The Splinter Cat is a fearsome critter from various places in North America. It is found from the Great Lakes to the Gulf, and eastward to the Atlantic Ocean, but it has been reported in the Rocky Mountains from only a few localities. Apparently the splinter cat inhabits that part of the country in which wild bees and raccoons abound, because they eat racoons or honey during dark and stormy nights. Strangely, they have a hard head to charge and break every tree in sight knocking them down to the floor until a hollow one containing food is found. Then they leave this place broken and shattered.

                            Maybe this story inspired by a forest destroyed after a windstorm. "Splintercat Creek", found in the northern Cascade Range of Oregon is named after this legendary animal.

                            The Hugag is a huge animal of the Lake States. Its range includes western Wisconsin, northern Minnesota, and a territory extending indefinitely northward in the Canadian wilds toward Hudson Bay. In size the hugag may be compared to the moose, and in form it somewhat resembles that animal. Very noticeable, however, are its jointless legs, which compel the animal to remain on its feet, and its long upper lip, which prevents it from grazing. If it tried that method of feeding it would simply tramp its upper lip into the dirt. Its head and neck are leathery and hairless. Its strangely corrugated ears flop downward, its four-toed feet, long bushy tail, shaggy coat and general make-up give the beast an unmistakably prehistoric appearance. The hugag has a perfect mania for traveling, and few hunters who have taken up its trail ever came up with the beast or back to camp.

                            It is reported to keep going all day long, browsing on twigs, flopping its lip around trees, and stripping bark as occasion offers, and at night, since it cannot lie down, it leans against a tree, bracing its hind legs and marking time with its front ones. The most successful hugag hunters have adopted the practice of notching trees so that they are almost ready to fall, and when the hugag leans up against one both the tree and the animal come down. In its helpless condition it is then easily dispatched. The last one killed, so far as known, was on Turtle River, in northern Minnesota, where a young one, weighing 1,800 pounds, was found stuck in the mud. It was knocked in the head by Mike Flynn, of Cass Lake.

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                            • #44
                              Thank you, Madhatter. I'm always amused by fearsome critters.


                              Currently working on: DtD Night Horrors: Enemy Action
                              Projects I've contributed to: C20 Anthology of Dreams ("No Such Thing As Dragons")

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                              • #45
                                I am glad you like them Have you had a chance to work on your Cu Sith a bit?

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