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  • #61
    Yes It would be an interesting Mad, Soulless, or Privateer Changeling.

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    • #62
      Because Drizzt Do'Urden has made the modern concept of dark elves being beautiful and sensual. I thought I would include the folktale version of dark elves.
      The Dark Elves, also known by their ancient Norse name Dökkálfar, are a sinister subspecies of elf found in many fantasy settings and having their origins in ancient Norse mythology where they were named Svartálfar ("Swart Elves" or "black elves" in Old Norse) and were depicted as light-hating supernatural beings akin to the unclean spirits and demons of later Christian tales and legends.
      Dark Elves were seen as greedy and toublesome in regards to humanity but were not strictly malevolent, although they shared some common traits with the trolls- such as turning to stone when exposed to direct sunlight and being humanoid in shape but extremely ugly.

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      • #63
        Aren't they basically the inspiration for dwarves?


        A god is just a monster you kneel to. - ArcaneArts, Quoting "Fall of Gods"

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        • #64
          I have heard two variations. One which states that they ARE dwarves and others that claim that they are distinct from dwarves.

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          • #65
            Here is an interesting fetch like fairy.
            Tatty Bogles are another name for a scarecrow in some parts of the United Kingdom (especially Scotland), the origin of the word however is linked to a folkloric creature similar to a goblin or fairy - who was believed to dress up like a scarecrow and either attack unwary visitors to the potato-field it haunted or bring blight to the crops.

            The Tatty Bogle was thus of the "Bogle" family of spirits, believed to be evil ghosts, fairies or demons by locals - related to earlier concepts such as the Unseelie Court and the Wild Hunt.

            The word comes from "tatty" (potato) and "bogle" (the spirit class mentioned above)

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            • #66
              Trow are a type of goblin found in the folklore of the Shetland and Orkney Isles - they are also similiar to the Norse trolls but tend to be shy and extremely small, however they are also known to be troublesome and only able to appear during the hours of the night.
              Trows would enter people's homes and cause mischief or play tricks and pranks but were also known to go as far as kidnapping humans - especially musicians, due to their legendary love of music.
              Although Trows are considered a dangerous and mischievious fairy they are not entirely without merit and when caught in a good mood they are said to teach humans magic as well as fiddle tunes.

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              • #67
                Trauco In the traditional Chilota mythology of Chiloé, the Trauco is a humanoid creature of small stature - similar to a dwarf or goblin - who lives in the deep forests. It has with an ugly face, and legs without feet.

                The Trauco is a mythical entity who inhabits the woods of Chiloé, an island in the south of Chile. It has a powerful magnetism that attracts young and middle-aged women. According to myth, the Trauco's wife is the wicked and ugly Fiura. The trauco carries a small stone-headed hatchet that he uses to strike trees in the forest to symbolize his sexual potency. Whoever the Trauco chooses will go to him, even if she is sleeping, and fall enraptured at his feet. No woman can resist his magical attraction; all have sexual intercouse with him. Men of Chiloé fear the Trauco, as his gaze can be deadly. When a single woman is pregnant and no one steps forward as the father, people assume that the Trauco is the father. Because the Trauco is irresistible, the woman is considered blameless. The Trauco is sometimes invoked to explain sudden or unwanted pregnancies, especially in unmarried women.

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                • #68
                  Scota Bess was an evil being from Orkney folklore who was best described as a malevolent hag- she was said to of once inhabited the area known as Stronsay and sat upon a rock formation known locally as the Mermaid's Chair casting wicked spells by which to summon storms.

                  Scota Bess was thus known (and feared) as one of Orkney's storm witches and embodies the unpredictable and dangerous nature of the open sea - somewhat ironically Scota Bess' ancient throne would later become associated with fortune telling and lost some of its former sinister status.

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                  • #69
                    Originally posted by Madhatter View Post
                    Because Drizzt Do'Urden has made the modern concept of dark elves being beautiful and sensual. I thought I would include the folktale version of dark elves.
                    The Dark Elves, also known by their ancient Norse name Dökkálfar, are a sinister subspecies of elf found in many fantasy settings and having their origins in ancient Norse mythology where they were named Svartálfar ("Swart Elves" or "black elves" in Old Norse) and were depicted as light-hating supernatural beings akin to the unclean spirits and demons of later Christian tales and legends.
                    Dark Elves were seen as greedy and toublesome in regards to humanity but were not strictly malevolent, although they shared some common traits with the trolls- such as turning to stone when exposed to direct sunlight and being humanoid in shape but extremely ugly.


                    They also had a habit of giving bad dreams to horses... Just because they were dicks, like that.


                    What about Orcs? They're sometimes depicted as being corrupted offshoots of elves

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                    • #70
                      Originally posted by Nyrufa View Post

                      What about Orcs? They're sometimes depicted as being corrupted offshoots of elves
                      Truthfully, the reason I didn't include orcs is due to the fact that they are a comparatively newer folklore invented by Tolkien and inspired by bugbears and goblins.

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                      • #71
                        Robots are almost the same age and we have Chrometooth as a True Fae. I think it can work


                        A god is just a monster you kneel to. - ArcaneArts, Quoting "Fall of Gods"

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                        • #72
                          Originally posted by Master Aquatosic View Post
                          Robots are almost the same age and we have Chrometooth as a True Fae. I think it can work

                          To be fair, we didn't even have the technological capacity to build robots until recently.

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                          • #73
                            I am not saying that orcs can't be changelings or True Fae. Rather, I try to include fae creatures that are not well known or put up folklore that allows popular fae entities to be reinterpreted in a less known way.

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                            • #74
                              Originally posted by Nyrufa View Post


                              To be fair, we didn't even have the technological capacity to build robots until recently.
                              But the concept of mechanical beings we would recognize as robots instead of golem is about that age


                              A god is just a monster you kneel to. - ArcaneArts, Quoting "Fall of Gods"

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                              • #75
                                Here are some interesting Fairy creatures that would make really creepy/cool Changelings.
                                The Pukwudgie, also known as bagwajinini or bokwjimen, among other things, is thought to be a magical creature of the forests and swamps. It is physically similar to a gray-skinned troll or other small goblin-type being in size and stature. The origin of the pukwudgie legend comes from Native American folklore. The name “pukwudgie” literally means “person of the wilderness.”

                                The Algonquian and Wampanoag tribes have many legends about this creature who is thought to be capable of both good and evil. To some it is a good natured and helpful being who inhabits the forests of the Great Lakes and New England regions. To others it is a mischievous trouble maker who is capable of terrible, even deadly deeds including kidnapping and sabotage. Pukwudgies use their wits as well as magical weapons such as bows and arrows against those who anger them.

                                The earliest legend of the pukwudgie seems to be connected to Wampanoag people. The Wampanoag believed in a creation giant named Maushop. He was responsible for creating much of the land the tribe called home. Maushop and his wife Granny Squanit were much loved and revered by the tribe. They lavished them both with affection and respect.

                                The smaller and less powerful pukwudgie were jealous of Maushop, as all their efforts to be helpful to the Wampanoag usually backfired. Instead of being loved, they were considered a nuisance. Rather than help the tribe, they decided to annoy them instead. Things soon escalated and the tribe turned to their creation giants.

                                Maushop was invoked to help rid the natives of their pukwudgie problem. He scooped up the little critters, shook them senseless, and tossed them all around the New England area, killing many of them in the process.
                                Eventually the surviving pukwudgies returned and exacted revenge on the tribe by setting fire to their homes, kidnapping their children, and luring many to their death deep in the woods.

                                Maushop again was called upon to help. This time he sent his five sons to take care of the problem. It wasn’t long before the pukwudgies dispensed of the five by shooting them with magic arrows.

                                An outraged Maushop and Granny Squanit went on a rampage crushing as many pukwudgies as they could find. Those that got away scattered across the region, laying low until Maushop faded into the native mythology.

                                Whatever colorful story folklore gives us about the pukwudgie, eyewitness accounts have been around for generations. Some believe that they are elemental type beings whose intent is to trick or tease their target. A run-in with this type would be scary to be sure but not necessary dangerous. But for others, the pukwudgie is more than a bothersome elemental. It is capable of causing accidents, pushing people off cliffs, and driving them to suicide among other things.

                                Interestingly, some of the places the pukwudgie have been known to frequent are connected to other supernatural beings. Recent reports put the pukwudgie in Massachusetts at the Freetown-Fall River State Forest on the Watuppa Reservation, an area belonging to the Wampanoag Nation. Fall River is the home of the infamous accused axe murderess Lizzy Borden, who may or may not be haunting her old residence.

                                Mounds State Park in Anderson, Indiana is another active pukwudgie area. Mounds State Park is the site of ancient mounds built by early native tribes who inhabited the area. Mythical properties are attributed to these mounds. A very famous haunted prison, Moundsville State Penitentiary, is not far from the Park.
                                Round Rock, Texas, is also considered a hot spot for these beings. People have encountered strange little gnome-like creatures while traveling Hairy Man Road. Round Rock hosts the Hairy Man festival, which is named for—you guessed it—Bigfoot!

                                Is it coincidence that these places are “supernaturally charged?” Maybe, although I personally believe that such things are more common than one might think.

                                Crytid, myth, or figment of the imagination, the pukwudgie is not to be ignored. Maybe those campfire tales told to us as small children have a sliver of truth behind them. Whatever the case may be, it is best to show respect and reverence for the world around us, whether that be the physical or metaphysical realm.

                                A Ciguapa is the Dominican Republic’s version of a Succubus.These wild creatures are nocturnal, and legends has it that they enjoy seducing men, luring them into the forest, only to kill them after having sex with them. At night time, the Ciguapas leave their forest homes to look for food such as fruit, fish, and birds. Not only dangerous and seductive, these creatures are also mischievous. When women are not in their kitchens, the Ciguapas will come and steal from them. They are always female with long, beautiful, dark hair. Their hair is so long, in fact, that it is the only covering for their otherwise naked bodies.

                                These creatures also have feet that face backward, which makes them particularly hard to catch, as their tracks are hard to follow since it’s impossible to tell which way they are going. The Ciguapas generally have dark skin, either brown or blue.

                                While descriptions of their bodies differ depending on the region of the Dominican Republic – some claim they are short and out of proportion, others say long-legged and thin – all agree that they have beautiful faces. However, no one has heard a Ciguapa speak; instead, they make a high-pitched squeaking noise, like a whine.

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