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  • #46
    Originally posted by Master Aquatosic View Post

    Sorry about this post. Did some sleep-posting yesterday. And I guess a certain someone decided to drop in
    No problem

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    • #47
      Originally posted by Madhatter View Post

      Very Cool! Were did you get inspiration for this True Fae?

      Been thinking about it for a day or two. Wasn't sure if I should post it, because it sounds like everybody else was taking real world examples of mythology.

      I wrote that one up on my own. Though for inspiration, I'd have to say something of a combination between Hellraiser and the Wall of the Faithless.

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      • #48
        The Tarasque is a legendary dragon from Provence, in southern France, that was tamed by Saint Martha of the New Testament. The dragon's story is very similar to that of King Kong's and the Beast's from Beauty and the Beast.

        According to the Golden Legend, a collection of the biographies of the saints and eccelesiastical leaders, the Tarasque terrorized the area Nerluc, causing massive devastation. The creaure was also believed to have been born to the Onachus, a bison-like beast who burnt anything it touched, and the Leviathan, a supposedly serpetine-like creature discussed in biblical texts. Its place of birth is believed to be Galatia.
        The king of Nerluc attempted to kill the beast by sending in his knights and catapults, but they both failed to defeat the beast. It is then that Saint Martha tamed the creature by using hymns and prayers. She then returned the tamed creature to Nerluc. The Tarasque was immediately killed by the fearful residents of the town despite the fact that the creature didn't try to defend itself.
        After the creature's death, Martha converted many of the townspeople to Christianity. The people of Nerluc felt very remorseful for killing the Tarasque, and renamed the town Tarascon as a tribute to it.

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        • #49
          It is said that the elusive unicorn can only be captured by the efforts of a virgin, all other attempts to restrain them will result in failure. So it is that the White King roams freely through his realm, evading the relentless pursuit, and mischievous tricks of his rivals who would seek to steal his power for themselves. His coat is the purest white, exhibiting not a single flaw or blemish anywhere on his person, while his golden mane and tail shine like sunlight. His hooves and horn are the color of silver, yet strong as diamonds, and his eyes are like blue sapphires that glimmer in their sockets. He cleanses anything he comes into contact with, purging diseases and toxins with a simple touch and restoring the youth and vitality to the wild lands he calls home. But while he freely roams the land with the wind sweeping through his mane and hooves galloping upon the grass, he remains ever weary of the one thing that can issue his downfall. And in the logic of the True Fae, he has decided that the best way to eliminate the threat to his freedom is simply to ensure there are no virgins within his vicinity. And like any True Fae, he is not particularly concerned whether or not the virgins are compliant with his decision.

          The White King has issued a decree to his subjects that no virgin is to be allowed within 100 yards of his location, and has given them autonomy to dispose of them as they see fit. In response to this, those who loyally serve him are contractually obligated to target virgins on sight and strip them of their power to harm their lord. The more intelligent servants go about this diplomatically, using charms and seduction to trick their targets into relinquishing their power voluntarily. The less intelligent ones are more brutish in their approach, and quickly draw the fury of the more offensively minded Courts around the Freehold. Sometimes, the White King considers one of these ex-virgins to be enticing or valuable enough to join his subjects. When this happens, he has them dragged through the Hedge to become a new addition to his wild paradise!
          Last edited by Nyrufa; 05-02-2017, 12:55 PM.

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          • #50
            Originally posted by Madhatter View Post
            In Folklore, fairies were broken into former pagan gods, demons, fallen angels, as well as ghosts and cursed humans. To me, it made sense that True Fae would be gods or even high court demons.
            That's actually what I choose to go with, too. I don't like the idea of the God Machine, or techno-demons, so I just chuck that mythos out of the game entirely. If I need a god / angel / demon / cosmic power, there's more than enough True Fae, Spirits and Ephemeral Beings capable of fulfilling those roles.

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            • #51
              Originally posted by Nyrufa View Post

              That's actually what I choose to go with, too. I don't like the idea of the God Machine, or techno-demons, so I just chuck that mythos out of the game entirely. If I need a god / angel / demon / cosmic power, there's more than enough True Fae, Spirits and Ephemeral Beings capable of fulfilling those roles.
              I agree completely to me CoD is about telling your own stories with some basic lore to keep things grounded, I hate having this underlying backstory, Part of the fun of games like this is keeping some things a mystery. I don't want to be TOLD how things are connected or who's in charge I want to make it up myself.

              I like making my own True Fae too there's nothing wrong with taking from mythology since Changling relies heavily on old fairy tales but sometimes its fun to do more than just grab a demon of wikipedia (not that that isn't a valid way to create a Fae since its still up to you to figure out to work them into the games rules).

              Here's an idea I've been tossing around and just now am fleshing out.
              The King of Thorns, The Queen of Roses, Warmonger


              There is one corner of Aracdia that is always torn by war. There are two massive kingdoms lead by two Fae, the Kingdom of Thorns and the Kingdom of Roses. They are both ruled by Warmonger, a Fae that has two bodies that of the King of Thorns, and that of the Queen of Roses. Their changelings are forced to take part in the endless war that the Fae rages against itself. The land that Warmonger inhabits consists of the two capital cities, the castles inside them, and a massive battlefield between them that is always caked in the blood changeling and hobgoblin alike.

              The shear size of the war that Warmonger wages means that almost any kith can emerge from its thralls. An Oger may result from one of his warriors while Beats may result from the beats of burden and war dogs that inhabit the battlefield. Darklings may come from the iron mines and forges that create the steel its soliders wield while the living bodies that fuel the forges may become Elementals, Wizzend may result from the couriers that must travel across the battlefields to deliver offers of ceasefire that and inevtiably shunned (and often result in the changeling becoming a prisoner of the "opposing" monarch).

              I'm going to work more on this now thanks a lot I was planning on doing something useful this weekend lol

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              • #52
                Here's one that I used over on the Play by Post section a while back.


                The Collector: it is not uncommon for hobbyists to display eccentric personalities and interests over the course of their hobby, even less so for those of the True Fey. The one known simply as The Collector is fascinated with human mythology and collects symbols and creatures derived from such legends. Of late, he has turned his attention towards astrology and the idea of horoscope birth signs. He's already collected the Greek Zodiac, and now turns his attention on that of the Chinese. When he visits the mortal world, he does so in the form of an elderly shop keeper who sells knickknacks and curios to other hobbyists like himself. But he always has a specialty item for sale; a golden figurine of whatever he is trying to add to his collection. These figurines are cursed with a pledge bound contract. The first mortals who purchase these figurines have agreed to travel to Arcadia and become part of the collection. In other words,the first customer to purchase a figurine of Scorpio would find themselves transported to Arcadia and taking on the form of a giant scorpion!

                Fortunately, there is a catch, as the contract does not explicitly state the customer is obligated to remain as part of the collection indefinitely. They're free to leave any time they want, so long as they manage to find a way to do so. Like most collectors, however, they value their possessions to the point of mania, and their Keeper's realm is loaded out the ass with security measures designed to keep them locked up on display. Only one piece of the collection is ever allowed to freely roam The Collector's realm at a time; and that's the star piece of the show. Members of the western Zodiac got to run around freely for about a month or so before they were locked up and another was freed from the shelf. But when it comes to the Chinese Zodiac, they get an entire year's worth of freedom! A whole year to search for a way out of this nightmare and return to freedom. If they fail, they're locked back in their display cases for 11 years until it's once again their turn to be let out. But that's assuming that The Collector isn't already focused on building another collection to replace them as his favored trophies...
                Last edited by Nyrufa; 03-19-2017, 03:31 PM.

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                • #53
                  Originally posted by Nyrufa View Post
                  Here's one that I used over on the Play by Post section a while back.


                  The Collector: it is not uncommon for hobbyists to display eccentric personalities and interests over the course of their hobby, even less so for those of the True Fey. The one known simply as The Collector is fascinated with human mythology and collects symbols and creatures derived from such legends. Of late, he has turned his attention towards astrology and the idea of horoscope birth signs. He's already collected the Greek Zodiac, and now turns his attention on that of the Chinese. When he visits the mortal world, he does so in the form of an elderly shop keeper who sells knickknacks and curios to other hobbyists like himself. But he always has a specialty item for sale; a golden figurine of whatever he is trying to add to his collection. These figurines are cursed with a pledge bound contract. The first mortals who purchase these figurines have agreed to travel to Arcadia and become part of the collection. In other words,the first customer to purchase a figurine of Scorpio would find themselves transported to Arcadia and taking on the form of a giant scorpion!

                  Fortunately, there is a catch, as the contract does not explicitly state the customer is obligated to remain as part of the collection indefinitely. They're free to leave any time they want, so long as they manage to find a way to do so. Like most collectors, however, they value their possessions to the point of mania, and their Keeper's realm is loaded out the ass with security measures designed to keep them locked up on display. Only one piece of the collection is ever allowed to freely roam The Collector's realm at a time; and that's the star piece of the show. Members of the western Zodiac got to run around freely for about a month or so before they were locked up and another was freed from the shelf. But when it comes to the Chinese Zodiac, they get an entire year's worth of freedom! A whole year to search for a way out of this nightmare and return to freedom. If they fail, they're locked back in their display cases for 11 years until it's once again their turn to be let out. But that's assuming that The Collector isn't already focused on building another collection to replace them as his favored trophies...
                  I think your ideas for True Fae are rather interesting. Do you have any ideas for wyrd 10 changelings?

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                  • #54
                    Originally posted by Madhatter View Post

                    I think your ideas for True Fae are rather interesting. Do you have any ideas for wyrd 10 changelings?

                    Not at this time, unfortunately. Waiting on Changeling 2nd edition to come out. Then it's going to be the next book I get for CoD.
                    Last edited by Nyrufa; 03-19-2017, 07:46 PM.

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                    • #55
                      Here are some Dragons that would make interesting True Fae.
                      Níðhöggr a powerful dragon in Norse Mythology that lives among the roots of the tree Yggdrasil which holds the 9 realms of Norse cosmology together. Níðhöggr also chews on the roots of the tree for all eternity with hopes to damage it and topple it. He has a rivalry with an unnamed eagle that lives at the top of the World Tree and the two exchange harsh words and messages through Ratatoskr, the giant mischievous squirrel, that bears the words between the two. It is said that the Níðhöggr will go off to Raganorak, the Norse Judgement day to aid the giants in their battle against the gods.

                      Sithi is a dragon from Baltic mythology that takes the form of a human woman to visit humans.

                      Smok Wawelski In Poland, a long time ago, in a den at the foot of Wawel Hill, there lived a terrible dragon. None of the inhabitants of the city Krakow from the poorest beggar to His majesty King Krak didn't know where it had come from and how it got there.

                      Everyone always trembled with fear. Always having the scary thought that the knigths guarding the dragon made their hair stand on end when they heard the monster roar. People said there was no weapon and no way that they were going to defeat the dragon.

                      As the days past the dragon made himself feel more at home living there which scared the villains even more.
                      One day King Krak told a poem to the people of Krakow:
                      He who once and for all puts this dragon
                      Shall recieve my sceptre and my royal crown,
                      So come and defeat this most horrid beast
                      And win my daughters hand and a wedding feats.
                      After that many brave and valient knights made their way from different countries to reach Poland to defeat the dragon.

                      Swords and arrows shattered on its scaly body as if on a shield. But nobody was able to kill this dragon or even drive it away. Time passed, the dragon laid waste to the grounds of Krakow. Fewer knights came every day. More people cam to desert the town, until one day a young man, a shoemaker known to know one, knocked on the gates of the town. He bore no arms and wore no amour. Some twine, a needle,and sharp mind were his only weapons. The guards wouldn't let him in unless he immediately went to see the king.

                      King Krak had heard what the boy was saying and decided to put some trust in him so he could have a go. The boy said that he would need: lambskin, some sulphur and mustard seed. The king nodded his acceptance to him.
                      All night long the shoemaker spent hard working on his plan. Local residents would peer through the window staring at his work. He took the lambskin, filled it with sulpher, pitch and mustard seed, and skillfully sewed up the hole of the lambs belly.

                      Everyone was now wondering what the morning would bring.
                      At sunrise the shoemaker set off to see the dragon with his bag of his ideal plan.There he laid his bait and quickly hid in the nearby bushes waiting to see what was going to happen.

                      The dragon awoke. The dragon knew he was hungary so he walked a bit for food. Suddenly the dragon saw a dead lamb(as it looked to him), looked at it and greedily jumped down to eat it and swallowed it whole with his jaws.
                      The dragon suddenly went "BANG!" and exploded. Exactly what the shoemaker had planned.

                      The villagers went silent. Then the sudden cheer began. All the knights ran to the bottom of the hill. The dragon was dead. But one thing was not. The river Wistula had been gulped up.

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                      • #56
                        Here are some Persian Gods that would make interesting True Fae. Drug
                        An ancient Iranian female demon, the representation of the lie. She causes much evil. She is the eternal opponent of Asha vahishta.

                        Angra Mainyu
                        God of darkness, the eternal destroyer of good, personification and creator of evil, bringer of death and disease. He is also known as Ahriman, and his name means "fiendish spirit". He is seen as the personification of evil, he leading the dark forces against the hosts of Spenta Mainyu, the holy spirit, who assisted Ahura Mazda, the wise lord, and final victor of the cosmic conflict. Ahriman introduced the frost in winter, heat in summer, all manner of diseases and other ills.

                        Dahaka
                        An ancient Persian god of death and demon of deceit and mendacity. He loves destroying life. Dahaka is usually depicted with three heads, while scorpions and lizards crawl all over his body.

                        Zarich
                        Zarich is one of the female members of the Daevas and the personification of ageing. Her eternal opponent is Ameretat.

                        Daeva
                        One of the Daevas, Aesma Daeva ("madness") is the demon of lust and anger, wrath and revenge. He is the personification of violence, a lover of conflict and war. Together with the demon of death, Asto Vidatu, he chases the souls of the deceased when they rise to heaven. His eternal opponent is Sraosa.

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                        • #57
                          I am surprised it took me so long to include these monsters as inspiration for the True Fae.

                          In the Aesir Kingdom of Asgaard, several prophecies had been handed down to the Gods, warning them that three unique siblings would appear who would bring such terrible disaster, that nothing but evil would come of it. Soon, the Gods of Asgard heard about Loki’s three children with the giantess Angrboda; Hel, Fenrir, and Jormungard.

                          When the Gods first learned about the children, they realized almost immediately that they might be the same children that they had been warned about. At first, they chose to believe that it was simply because of the terrible nature of their mother. Then, after they had considered it for a while, they came to realize that the children were the same ones mentioned in the prophecies; however, it was not because of who their mother was, that caused them such great concern; it was actually because of who their father was. Their father was Loki, who was known for causing great destruction and evil. Loki also happened to be the brother of Odin, the leader of the Aesir, which was a patriarchal and warlike tribe of Norse Gods and Goddesses.

                          Fenrir, The Eldest child of Loki was a monstrous and gigantic wolf who proved extremely difficult for the Aesgard to contain. Three different types of fetters, or bindings, were created before the gods were successful in confining the wolf. The first was called Leyding. It did not last long as one sharp kick from Fenrir snapped the chain apart. The second attempted fetter was twice as strong as Leyding and was known as Dromi; though it took Fenrir longer to break, it did meet the same fate as the first. By the third attempt the gods knew they needed skill beyond their own. Odin, the primary chief of the Æsir, sent word to the dwarves of Svartálfaheimr, the land of the black elves. These dark dwarves lived underground and were ill-natured for the most part, but they nonetheless agreed to craft a chain powerful enough to prevent the giant wolf from escaping. The dwarves soon presented Odin with Gleipnir, a shackle made of six mythical ingredients: the sound of a cat's feet, the roots of a mountain, a bear's sinews, a woman's beard, a fish's breath, and a bird's spit. With these six ingredients—supposedly no longer in existence today due to this procedure—the resulting chain was as smooth as ribbon, but as strong as iron would be to mortals. When the fetter was to be placed upon Fenrir on the island of Lyngvi, even the wolf doubted his ability to escape. And when the gods goaded him into trying to break free, Fenrir demanded a show of good faith before allowing it to be put upon him.

                          The god of law and justice, Tyr stepped forward then and placed his hand in the mouth of the wolf, the only god of the Æsir brave enough to risk himself for the good of the whole. Only then did Fenrir allow himself to be chained again, the goading as successful a tactic as Tyr's bravery. Every attempt the wolf made to be freed turned out to be futile. In anger at his failure and the gods' ability to entrap him, Fenrir snapped off Tyr's hand. Relieved that Fenrir was bound, all except Tyr of course, the Æsir looped Glepinir's cord Gelgja through a massive stone slab called Gjöll, and anchored it with a large rock known as Thviti, effectively binding Fenrir permanently to one spot. The wolf's unrelenting howls led to a sword being shoved between his jaws, the hilt keeping his mouth wide, silencing him until the time of Ragnarök. Then and only then would Fenrir see freedom. The shaking of the earth and the uprooting of mountains would tear Gleipnir apart, unleashing the wolf on Odin, enabling him to swallow the chief of the gods whole.
                          Hel daughter of Loki and Angrabota, she is a grotesque hag with gangrene legs, a body that is half blue, and a hideous face.The name Hel, quite literally means "one that hides" or "one who covers up." If you look at it as if it was the actual root of a name, you might discover that there appears to be a great many places which quite possibly may have been named after her, such as Holland, Helsinki, Holstein, Helvetia and Holderness.

                          because her appearance caused the other Gods to feel so uncomfortable that they avoided having anything to do with her. Being seen as an oddity, being avoided, and having no friends was very difficult for Hel to deal with. She was extremely unhappy, and filled with great loneliness and despair. After much deliberation, Hel made an important decision. She went to Odin and explained to him how difficult her life was there, and then she asked for his permission to leave Asgaard. Odin sympathized with Hel, so he granted her wish. Much more importantly, he also gave her the World of Niflheim, one of the Nine Worlds of Norse Mythology, to rule. He even went so far as to name that place after her, calling it Helheim or Hel. That was how Hel became the Goddess of the Dead.

                          Upon being banished to the Underworld by Odin for her hideousness and evil, she quickly made the realm her own. Unlike Satan/ the Devil’s version of hell, Hel’s realm of cold, damp, dank, and boring, filled with apathetic souls whose cardinal sin was being boring buggers who spent their lives sitting on their asses instead of fighting, pillaging, and raping. Her Underworld is melancholy and boring instead of a fiery pit of eternal suffering.

                          Jormungandr The youngest child of Loki is the Midgard serpent, who is said to encircle the world and bite it own tail. When the Aesir took it in, it soon grew too large for them to control. So Odin threw it into the ocean to render it harmless.
                          The 'Prose (or Younger) Edda' recounts how Thor almost slew Jormungand. In the land of giants, Thor went fishing with the fisherman giant Hymir. Hymir, unaware that his companion was the thunder god, refused to recommend any particular bait, so Thor chopped off the head of Hymir's largest ox, named Himinhriot, and put it in the boat. Thor rowed skillfully, taking the boat out into the open sea, far beyond the place where the giant usually fished. He fastened the ox's head to the hook and threw out his line. The Midgard Serpent, languishing in the ocean bed, stretched its mouth around the ox head and was caught fast on the hook. Using his tremendous strength, Thor hauled the serpent up and locked eyes with him. Thor was about to kill the serpent with a blow from his magic hammer, Mjolnir, when Hymir, in a panic that his boat would capsize and terrified at the sight of the serpent, cut the line with his bait knife. The serpent escaped and sank back into the sea. Thor threw his hammer after it, and while some believed the serpent dead, the 'Prose Edda' says, "the Midgard Serpent lives still and lies in the encircling sea."

                          In another encounter, a magician-giant tested Thor's strength by challenging him to lift a grey cat. The cat was so heavy that Thor only succeeded in lifting one paw off the ground. Although the giant feigned contempt for the puny deed, he later confessed that he was astonished at Thor's feat, for the cat was really the Midgard Serpent, and Thor had lifted it "not far from the sky."

                          At the end of time, during Ragnarok, the final battle between the forces of good and evil, Thor was destined to encounter Jormungand again. He would at long last kill him with a hammer blow, but he would himself survive only long enough to take nine paces from the serpent before succumbing to its poison. In this way, the Midgard Serpent and Thor would kill each other at the end of the world


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                          • #58
                            Here's a Berserk conversion!


                            The Idea of Evil: not all ideas are good ones, and some in particular are especially detrimental to society. The Idea of Evil is an ancient, primordial Fey from the dawn of mankind's earliest existence. It claims to have been granted life by humanity's inability to accept the chaos of the world. Bad things didn't just happen for no reason, there had to be a cause. This philosophy gave birth to the beings we know now. It's soul existence revolves around giving humans a reason for their suffering. It has been watching our world, manipulating the laws of causality with the skillful hand of a god. It orchestrates events that span across generations, all to set the pieces in place for tragedy and wickedness to plague our lives.

                            But as powerful as this thing is, it does not operate alone. Sometimes it finds a particular mortal that it takes a liking to, somebody who has the potential to advance its plans on earth. When it finds such a human, it singles them out, bestowing them with a hedge spun relic that binds them into a contract of servitude. Once received, The Idea of Evil visits upon them a tragedy of such proportion, that they have no choice but to sacrifice their heart in order to survive. That is when they change, becoming apostles of evil. Then it sets them loose upon the mortal world to indulge in their new existence, or the rail against it in a fit of rage and sorrow.
                            Last edited by Nyrufa; 03-31-2017, 06:39 AM.

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                            • #59
                              These are two religious figures that would make fascinating True Fae.
                              Gog Magog or Ya'juj Ma'juj are satyrsthat appear in the Qur’an, Book of Genesis, the Book of Ezekiel and the Book of Revelation. They are variously presented as hairy humanoids, demons or national groups that lurked upon the land. Gog and Magog occur widely in mythology and folklore and their existence is accepted by many religions including Islam, Christianity and Judaism. The widely accepted belief both in Christianity and Islam holds that “He of the Two Horns” (a great and righteous ruler) or Two Ages (one who impacts on two ages) travelled the world in three directions, until he found a tribe threatened by Gog and Magog, who were of an “evil and destructive nature” and “caused great corruption on earth.” The people offered tribute in exchange for protection, he agreed to help them, but refused the tribute; he constructed a great wall that the hostile nations were unable to penetrate. They will be trapped there until doomsday, and their escape will be a sign of the end: “The War of Gog and Magog” would precede the end of the world.

                              The etymology of both the names Gog and Magog remains uncertain. The ma- at the beginning of Magog may indicate a land, or it may mean "from", so that Magog means "of the land of Gog" or "from Gog". Gog may originate as the Hebrew version of the name of Gyges of Lydia, who made his kingdom a great power in the early 7th century BC, but this explanation, although common, is not universally accepted. A different theory is that "Magog" might be a reference to Babylon, by turning BBL ("Babylon" in Hebrew script, which originally had no vowel-signs) into MGG (Magog), but this account, like the others, has problems.

                              The story of Gog and Magog is mentioned in the Qur'an in two occasions. First, in the 18th chapter and second in the 21st chapter. In Surat Al-Kahf ("The Cave", 18:83–98) of the Qur'an, a pious warrior king called Dhul-Qarnayn whom Allah gave power journeys to the place between the East and the West. On his journey to the West, he comes across a people who live near a murky water (identified as modern day Black Sea). He then decrees to punish those who were found to have done acts of Dhulm (i.e. injustice and oppression) and reward those who have faith and do good deeds. And then he sets out to the direction of the East until he comes upon people who live a primitive way of life so he leaves them undisturbed. On his third journey (towards north, identified as the Caucasus Mountains) he meets "a people who scarcely understood a word". They seek his help by building a barrier that separate them from the people of Gog and Magog who "do great mischief on earth" and live across the mountain. He agrees to build it for them, and warns that when the time comes (Last Age commences), Allah "will make it to dust" and the people of Gog and Magog will breach through the barrier. The clue of that time could be found in chapter 21:95-96.

                              They ask thee concerning Dhu'l-Qarnayn. Say, "I will rehearse to you something of his story. Verily We established his power on earth, and We gave him the ways and the means to all ends. One (such) way he followed, Until, when he reached the setting of the sun, he found it set in a spring of murky water: Near it he found a People: We said: "O Dhu'l-Qarnayn! (thou hast authority,) either to punish them, or to treat them with kindness. He said, "As for one who does acts of Dhulm (i.e. injustice and oppression), we will punish him. Then he will be returned to his Lord, and He will punish him with a terrible punishment. But as for one who believes and does righteousness, he will have a goodly reward, and we will speak to him from our command with ease. Then followed he (another) way, Until, when he came to the rising of the sun, he found it rising on a people for whom We had provided no covering protection against the sun. (He left them) as they were: We completely understood what was before him. Then followed he (another) way, Until, when he reached (a tract) between two mountains, he found, beneath them, a people who scarcely understood a word. They said: "O Dhu'l-Qarnayn! the Gog and Magog (People) do great mischief on earth: shall we then render thee tribute in order that thou mightest erect a barrier between us and them? He said: "(The power) in which my Lord has established me is better (than tribute): Help me therefore with strength (and labour): I will erect a strong barrier between you and them: "Bring me blocks of iron." At length, when he had filled up the space between the two steep mountain-sides, He said, "Blow (with your bellows)" Then, when he had made it (red) as fire, he said: "Bring me, that I may pour over it, molten copper. So (Gog and Magog) were unable to pass over it, nor were they able to dig through it. He said: "This is a mercy from my Lord: But when the promise of my Lord comes to pass, He will make it into dust; and the promise of my Lord is true. Magog is the second of the seven sons of Japheth mentioned in the Table of Nations in Genesis 10. It may represent Hebrew for "from Gog", though this is far from certain. Magog is often associated with apocalyptic traditions, mainly in connection with Ezekiel 38 and 39 which mentions "Gog of the land of Magog, the chief prince of Meshech and Tubal" (Ezek 38:2 NIV); on the basis of this mention, "Gog and Magog" over time became associated with each other as a pair. In the New Testament, this pairing is found in the Book of Revelation 20:8, in which instance they may merely be metaphors for archetypical enemies of God.

                              Trojan-British War (Caesar's Invasions of Britain) 54-55 BC
                              Gogmagog - also Goemagot, Goemagog or Gogmagoc - was a legendary giant in British folklore. According to the 12th Century Historia Regum Britanniae ("The History of The Kings of Britain") by Geoffrey of Monmouth, Gogmagog was a giant inhabitant of Albion, and was thrown off a cliff during a wrestling match with Corineus who was a companion of Brutus of Troy. The Historia Regum Britanniae relates that Albion was only inhabited "by a few giants" when Brutus and his fellow Trojans arrived. Corineus was given Cornwall to govern, where there were more giants than in any other province. Among these giants "was one detestable monster, named Goëmagot (Gogmagog), in stature twelve cubits, and of such prodigious strength that at one shake he pulled up an oak as if it had been a hazel wand". When Brutus is holding a feast with his companions in Totnes, (or more likely Dartmouth which is much nearer the sea) some twenty giants led by Goëmagot descend on the company "among whom he made a dreadful slaughter". At last the giants were routed and slain except for Goëmagot who is captured so that Corineus can wrestle with him. The giant breaks three of Corineus's ribs, which so enrages him that he "ran with him, as fast as the weight would allow him, to the next shore" and "getting upon the top of a high rock, hurled down the savage monster into the sea; where, falling on the sides of craggy rocks, he was torn to pieces". The place where he fell "is called Lam Goëmagot, that is, Goëmagot's Leap, to this day”.

                              Solomon Island WW2 1940s

                              The Solomon Islands are an island chain east of Papua New Guinea that is comprised of nearly 1,000 individual islands. These islands experienced some of the fiercest fighting in World War II, and are most famous for the bloody Battle of Guadalcanal. Japanese soldiers had more to contend with than allied soldiers on the Solomon islands. While traversing the islands’ numerous remote, thick rain forests, the soldiers often reported coming across giant, hairy hominids ranging from 10 to 15 feet in height. In many instances, these were not fleeting glimpses of the creatures either, as some units reported the giants as being quite aggressive and even attacking on occasion. Indeed, the Solomon Islands have a long history of mysterious giants, and the local people are well aware of them. There is a rich tradition of folklore, as well as sightings and footprint evidence of giant hairy hominids on the islands that continue right up to the present day.
                              These creatures are described as being commonly around 10 feet tall, but as large as 15 feet tall. They are said to be covered in long, brown to reddish brown hair, with prominent brows, flat noses, and wide mouths.

                              A good resource for more information on these giants is the book Solomon Island Mysteries, by Marius Boirayon.

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                              • #60
                                Here are two crypts that would make fun True Fae.
                                The Ayia Napa Sea Monster is a cryptid, claimed to inhabit the coast off of Ayia Napa in Cyprus, a popular tourist resort on the Mediterranean. Most sightings occur around Cape Greco (Cavo Greko). It is known by the local fishermen as “To Filiko Teras”,which translates as “The Friendly Monster”. There have been no reports of it causing any harm, although it has been reported at times to rip and drag away fishing nets. There have been countless sightings of the “Creature from the Depths”, with some local newspapers calling the mystery the “Cyprus Loch Ness”. It has been speculated to be something like a crocodile or serpent.
                                There is no evidence that the monster actually exists, except in folklore and through various sightings by tourists and locals alike. There exists little photographic evidence, except unverified short-films and pictures. A search for the monster was recently featured in a Destination Truth episode on the SyFy (formerly Sci-Fi Channel) series in Series 04 (episode 13).

                                Many believers of the myth of the Ayia Napa Sea Monster like to link it with the common mythical sea monster of Greek mythology called Scylla, which is depicted in the mosaics that remain in the House of Dionysus, a Roman villa from the 2nd century AD in Paphos, Cyprus. Many ancient authorities describe it as a monstrous form of a giant maiden in torso, with a serpent for its lower body, having six snarling dog-heads issuing from its midriff, including their twelve forelimbs. This is the form described by Gaius Julius Hyginus, the Bibliotheca and the Suda, among so many others, and it is this form most often depicted on vase paintings. According to a description from Hyginus, a Latin author, actually it possessed “more heads than the vase-painters could paint”, and whoever encountered it was killed almost instantaneously.

                                Government officials have started a search for the monster and its existence. The hope of spotting the Ayia Napa Sea Monster remains a highlight for many tourists on boating day-trips. Many hotels boast to being close to sightings. There is no possible link to any such sea monster and any monster said to be living in Kouris Dam, which according to reports are more likely to be crocodiles that had been kept as pets but unlawfully released.

                                The Grootslang or Grote Slang is a Legendary cryptic said to dwell in a cave deep in Richtersveld, South Africa.

                                According to legend, the Grootslang is a primordial creature as old as the world itself. Tales state that gods (who were new to the crafting of things) made a terrible mistake in the Grootslang's creation, and gave it tremendous strength, cunning, and intellect. Realizing their mistake, the gods split the Grootslang into separate creatures and thus created the first elephants and the first snakes. But one of the original Grootslangs escaped, and from this first sire all other Grootslangs were born. It is claimed to devour elephants by luring them into its cave. The cave is known as the "Wonder Hole" or the "Bottomless Pit". Supposedly, it connects to the sea which is 40 miles away. According to local legend, the cave is filled with diamonds. It is also said to live in warm rivers and lakes.

                                In Benin, it is said to be a huge elephant-like creature with a serpent's tail. Also according to the tale, Grootslangs covet gems, particularly diamonds, and despite the creatures' lust for cruelty, victims can often bargain for their freedom by offering a Grootslang enough precious gems. While searching for treasure in the Richterveld of South Africa in 1917, English businessman Peter Grayson disappeared after members of his party were attacked and injured by lions, prompting legends that the Grootslang had killed him thereof.

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