Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

A Walk in the Hedge

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Axelgear
    replied
    I kinda hope we get some magical weather Tilts. I'd like a bit more in the way of weather magic in 2e. Felt kinda weird that Elementals couldn't conjure a rainstorm unless they joined the Spring Court.

    Leave a comment:


  • nofather
    replied
    Seriously. Constant mantras of fear in these forums. 'Those things I don't know about are probably going to be a disappointment.'

    It's coming, and there's no need to be superstitious. Thinking something might turn out well is not going to fate it to awfulness. There's more open development that will be revealed, I'm sure, and Rose is a proven developer and writer. Blood and Smoke was fantastic. And it sounds like her team aren't a bunch of slack-jawed yokels who've never played a game before. And they're all fans of Changeling. Even if there are aspects you don't like, there's like two other builds that are going to be available you can hack off of and this forum is full of homebrewers and the system has proven itself very easy to move around like that, especially regarding setting changes.
    Last edited by nofather; 04-22-2017, 01:21 AM. Reason: No offense intended to slack-jawed yokels.

    Leave a comment:


  • Charlaquin
    replied
    Originally posted by milo v3 View Post
    I still worry about that, since the only bit missing from the preview appears to be the dreaming roads (which appear to have replaced bastions).

    I hope it'll be more obvious in the mechanics section I suppose.
    I share your worry, but I am comforted by Rose's track record of expressing metaphor through mechanics. Requiem 2e is a shining example of this done well, so I trust she will be able to pull it off with Changeling too.

    Leave a comment:


  • Omegaphallic
    replied
    Originally posted by Charlaquin View Post

    It's not really something you are, it's a quality of commentary on fiction. When you explain something in fiction from an in-universe perspective, the explanation is wattsonian. When you explain it from an out of universe perspective, the explanation is Doylist. Both are important for critical analysis of fictional works.

    EDIT: for a concrete example, a Wattsonian explanation of the purpose of the eponymous Labyrinth in Jim Henson's film would be that it's there to prevent Sarah from getting to Toby (or in the graphic novels, to test the ice queen's love for Jareth.) A Doylist explanation would be that the Labyrinth exists to set up and then break audience expectations.
    I was referring to personal preference.

    Leave a comment:


  • milo v3
    replied
    Originally posted by Charlaquin View Post

    Ok, I like that. I do hope that will be conveyed a bit more clearly in the full text, but this is a really cool interpretation.
    I still worry about that, since the only bit missing from the preview appears to be the dreaming roads (which appear to have replaced bastions).

    I hope it'll be more obvious in the mechanics section I suppose.

    Leave a comment:


  • Charlaquin
    replied
    Originally posted by Omegaphallic View Post

    I had to look up Doylist. I tend to be a mix if Watsonian and Doylist leaning heavily towards Watsonian.
    It's not really something you are, it's a quality of commentary on fiction. When you explain something in fiction from an in-universe perspective, the explanation is wattsonian. When you explain it from an out of universe perspective, the explanation is Doylist. Both are important for critical analysis of fictional works.

    EDIT: for a concrete example, a Wattsonian explanation of the purpose of the eponymous Labyrinth in Jim Henson's film would be that it's there to prevent Sarah from getting to Toby (or in the graphic novels, to test the ice queen's love for Jareth.) A Doylist explanation would be that the Labyrinth exists to set up and then break audience expectations.
    Last edited by Charlaquin; 04-21-2017, 10:48 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Omegaphallic
    replied
    Originally posted by 21C Hermit View Post

    So, the context of Pain from the previous version is still here. Except that it's been widened and softened to Risk.

    Now I finally get it. Risk. It all clicks in.

    Ironside is Reality, and Faerie is Fantasy. The Hedge is what separates Ironside from Faerie. Risk is what separates Reality from Fantasy. The Hedge is what connects Ironside and Faerie. Risk is what connects Reality and Fantasy.
    Good summary.

    Leave a comment:


  • Omegaphallic
    replied
    Originally posted by Charlaquin View Post

    I was looking for something a bit more Doylist. I understand the Hedge's place in the fictional universe, what I'm not seeing yet is its purpose in the narrative of Changeling: the Lost.
    I had to look up Doylist. I tend to be a mix if Watsonian and Doylist leaning heavily towards Watsonian.

    Leave a comment:


  • Diggs
    replied
    Originally posted by Charlaquin View Post
    You're describing its superficial qualities, not its narrative role. I'm not asking what fictional fairy tale world it resembles, I'm asking what it does to enhance the story.
    I was not trying to answer your question. I'm not sure enough information was provided to know the answer, but good luck with that. I was trying to make a statement of what the text conveyed to me. I don't think answering "what" is superficial and "why" more deep. I need both answers. Sorry, can't help with your quest. I assume the book will at least answer your question. It should.

    Leave a comment:


  • Charlaquin
    replied
    Originally posted by 21C Hermit View Post

    So, the context of Pain from the previous version is still here. Except that it's been widened and softened to Risk.

    Now I finally get it. Risk. It all clicks in.

    Ironside is Reality, and Faerie is Fantasy. The Hedge is what separates Ironside from Faerie. Risk is what separates Reality from Fantasy. The Hedge is what connects Ironside and Faerie. Risk is what connects Reality and Fantasy.
    Ok, I like that. I do hope that will be conveyed a bit more clearly in the full text, but this is a really cool interpretation.

    Leave a comment:


  • 21C Hermit
    replied
    Risk, Bargains, and Adventures.

    Already I'm liking Changeling more than I did a few days ago.

    Leave a comment:


  • Satchel
    replied
    Originally posted by 21C Hermit View Post

    So, the context of Pain from the previous version is still here. Except that it's been widened and softened to Risk.

    Now I finally get it. Risk. It all clicks in.

    Ironside is Reality, and Faerie is Fantasy. The Hedge is what separates Ironside from Faerie. Risk is what separates Reality from Fantasy. The Hedge is what connects Ironside and Faerie. Risk is what connects Reality and Fantasy.
    It also feeds nicely into the loose economic theme that Changeling metaphysics approach* through the lens of Fortune — almost every move you can make constitutes some form of investment, and losses stemming from losing out on a risky venture can be very painful indeed.

    * Even without Goblin Markets and Goldspinners and the like, I will never get tired of pointing out that Changeling was the first line in Chronicles to have a literal and explicit mercenary bloc as corebook antagonists.

    Leave a comment:


  • Axelgear
    replied
    Originally posted by Rose Bailey View Post

    Changeling is about reclaiming your life. But when you're doing that, you have to take risks and be vulnerable and go places that the people living lives of safety and privilege don't. You can avoid going back to the things that hurt you worst -- Arcadia -- but life is still about risks and climbing out on limbs and admitting that you need things that don't come easy. And then when you do those things, you find that some of them go badly and hurt you, while others are unexpectedly rewarding and growth-encouraging.

    The Hedge is those kinds of necessary risks made into physical reality.
    In a word, "adventure". Both in the traditional and non-traditional senses.

    Leave a comment:


  • 21C Hermit
    replied
    Originally posted by Rose Bailey View Post

    Changeling is about reclaiming your life. But when you're doing that, you have to take risks and be vulnerable and go places that the people living lives of safety and privilege don't. You can avoid going back to the things that hurt you worst -- Arcadia -- but life is still about risks and climbing out on limbs and admitting that you need things that don't come easy. And then when you do those things, you find that some of them go badly and hurt you, while others are unexpectedly rewarding and growth-encouraging.

    The Hedge is those kinds of necessary risks made into physical reality.
    So, the context of Pain from the previous version is still here. Except that it's been widened and softened to Risk.

    Now I finally get it. Risk. It all clicks in.

    Ironside is Reality, and Faerie is Fantasy. The Hedge is what separates Ironside from Faerie. Risk is what separates Reality from Fantasy. The Hedge is what connects Ironside and Faerie. Risk is what connects Reality and Fantasy.

    Leave a comment:


  • Charlaquin
    replied
    Originally posted by Diggs View Post
    Wonderland is what I pictured from the new text. The earlier text seemed darker to me. I have no particular preference, but I have a much harder time explaining how to describe the earlier expression to someone that doesn't get it on their own. If someone says to me "you say the Hedge is like Wonderland but which version?" then I would say all of them, sometimes all at once, savvy? There is advantage in that and the other way had its advantages as well. There is risk to really hone into a narrow laser-like focus. Pros and cons either way.
    You're describing its superficial qualities, not its narrative role. I'm not asking what fictional fairy tale world it resembles, I'm asking what it does to enhance the story.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X