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Prove you're not a Loyalist

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  • Prove you're not a Loyalist

    Assume the PCs must find a McGuffin that's been hidden by the Freehold more than a hundred years ago.
    The McGuffin has been very useful in the past to protect the Freehold from True Fae and Huntsmen, but the Courts feared that there may be Loyalist spies and infiltrators that would steal it. So they agreed to keep it hidden and well-guarded by guardians, magic and tests.

    What kind of tests or challenges could check if Changelings seeking the McGuffin were Loyalist or not?
    Note that the tests don't have to actually 100% work, only that they should, according to the minds of the courtiers that designed the challenges a hundred years ago.
    Last edited by moonwhisper; 02-16-2021, 10:00 AM.

  • #2
    Having escaped from Arcadia, all Lost can slip out of restraints with minimum effort. Loyalists, having never actually escaped, should not possess that ability - or so the logic of Courtiers goes. In order to prove one's allegiance, a Changeling must escape being handcuffed, chained or locked in a box. Different Courtiers debate whether this test would work on Privateers, but agree that better something than nothing.

    There's also the matter of "Sight of Truth and Lies" - a Goblin Contract that acts as a lie detector. Rational Changelings would use it whenever possible, but several caveats apply. 1) They need to know such a Contract exists, and be able to procur it. 2) They need to trust a Goblin Merchant on their word, that the Contract works as advertised. 3) This power can possibly be cheated by supernatural lies, like those enforced by the "Glib Tongue" Goblin Contract. An enterprising Goblin Merchant could offer both of these, depending on clientele.


    ~

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    • #3
      A simple (albeit somewhat boring/potentially silly) way is that, in order to access the object, a changeling must first swear a pledge (even a basic sealing works) to tell the truth to a guardian entity, and then state they're not a Loyalist (probably as thoroughly as possible). If the pledge doesn't break, they can pass on through to the next trial.

      Or maybe there's some sort of Token that reveals if someone touching it has worked against the Freehold within a given timespan.

      You might also incorporate the Freehold's history and culture into the trials. Did an infamous Loyalist in the past leave a heavy impression on the local Lost, coloring their assumptions about how they behave and operate? If they're prejudiced against the Courtless, maybe only Lost in possession of a Mantle can gain access. Or perhaps first a licensed Oneiromancer has to explore the prospect's dreams for signs of betrayal before implanting the first clue to the object's location within their subconscious.

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      • #4
        Reading the core book one detail comes to my attention, it seems that Loyalist are subjected to the behaviour limits imposed by the Courts bargains.
        Then the trials could incorporate such tests

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Teatime View Post
          Having escaped from Arcadia, all Lost can slip out of restraints with minimum effort. Loyalists, having never actually escaped, should not possess that ability - or so the logic of Courtiers goes. In order to prove one's allegiance, a Changeling must escape being handcuffed, chained or locked in a box. Different Courtiers debate whether this test would work on Privateers, but agree that better something than nothing.

          There's also the matter of "Sight of Truth and Lies" - a Goblin Contract that acts as a lie detector. Rational Changelings would use it whenever possible, but several caveats apply. 1) They need to know such a Contract exists, and be able to procur it. 2) They need to trust a Goblin Merchant on their word, that the Contract works as advertised. 3) This power can possibly be cheated by supernatural lies, like those enforced by the "Glib Tongue" Goblin Contract. An enterprising Goblin Merchant could offer both of these, depending on clientele.
          Whoa seriously? Is that just some headcanon for not being able to escape restraints? That's pretty clever way of seeing it

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          • #6
            I second the 'pledge to answer questions honestly' answer. It's easy to set up and tough to cheat if the interrogator is thorough. Back in first edition when pledges had more in the way of truly dire consequences I used it as an intimidation tactic. "I swear on my True Name to tell you no lies this day" was such a massive overreaction to "How do I know I can trust you?" that nobody ever asked for more proof.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Primordial newcomer View Post

              Whoa seriously? Is that just some headcanon for not being able to escape restraints? That's pretty clever way of seeing it
              From what i ve readed from the core, it seems to me that a Loyalist escaped from Arcadia but decided to come back, or was sent to another realm and still decided to come back.
              Then a Loyalist should still be able to escape restrains

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Primordial newcomer View Post
                Whoa seriously? Is that just some headcanon for not being able to escape restraints? That's pretty clever way of seeing it
                Yeah, it's just headcanon on my part. Moonwhisper outright stated that the test of allegiance doesn't have to actually work, so I allowed myself to slip this headcanon in as an assumption Changelings may make.

                Originally posted by Neos01 View Post
                From what i ve readed from the core, it seems to me that a Loyalist escaped from Arcadia but decided to come back, or was sent to another realm and still decided to come back.
                Then a Loyalist should still be able to escape restrains
                If we choose to take my headcanon as fact of the campaign, the former Loyalist should probably be able to slip bonds, but the latter likely wouldn't. I would replace that ability with something thematic, like being able to call Arcadian backup, or something similar.


                ~

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                • #9
                  Lots of interesting ideas here. Thanks!

                  Originally posted by Teatime View Post

                  If we choose to take my headcanon as fact of the campaign, the former Loyalist should probably be able to slip bonds, but the latter likely wouldn't.
                  I like it. A literal loophole in the rules that allows Loyalists to escape bonds? That's very much in the spirit of Changeling.

                  I guess having to swear a pledge not to lie, or a truth-detecting Contract is probably the simplest and most effective solution. But as there may be several trials, I could end up using several of the ideas proposed.

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