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The Presumption of the Gods: Imperial Contracts

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  • The Presumption of the Gods: Imperial Contracts

    The Gentry declare themselves royalty, the satraps and daimyo and papesses of Arcadia. Surely then, by way of analogy, it can be assumed that the Royal Contracts form the apogee of their great and terrible powers, yes?

    Bzzt, wrongo buster.

    Arcadian Contracts may represent pacts made with the pillars of reality from time immemorial, but Faerie holds deeper magic still, sealings not with amethyst or coatl but with the underpinning rules of a realm of beautiful madness, immortal covenants between Fae and Wyrd, metamagic that throws every foothold and assumption to the wind. These are the big occult guns, the sorceries that keep Autumn courtiers up at night—a little in fear, but mainly envy. As mighty as the Imperial Contracts are, they’re still Contracts, which means a brave and clever Lost can bargain for one, if they just know how.

    After all, what’s the worst that could happen?

    Systems

    Despite their Arcadian nature, Imperial Contracts transcend Regalia; in fact, each is more akin to a Regalia in itself. Neither do they possess any seeming clauses.

    Like their lesser kin, Imperial Contracts contain Loopholes. However, instead of allowing the user the chance to wield their powers free of charge, these Loopholes allow a changeling to use the Contract without rending her sanity to shreds. If a Lost activates an Imperial Contract without fulfilling its Loophole, she immediately and automatically suffers a point of severe Clarity damage. A True Fae can use an Imperial Contract without satisfying the Loophole three times per story, after which it is barred to them.

    A changeling of Wyrd 6 of higher may acquire a single Imperial Contract. This is a dangerous affair, as it involves bargaining with the underpinning forces of Arcadia itself, which means accomplishing a voyage back to Faerie to seek out the abstract concepts that empower these high magicks. It’s rumored (among the paltry handful of sages who even know about the existence of these things) that a Lost in possession of an Eldritch Entitlement may be able to gain a second Imperial Contract, but if such a proposition is true, no cases have ever presented themselves. A changeling with less than Wyrd 6 may also acquire an Imperial Contract if she currently bears a Court’s Crown, though if she loses her standing, she also loses access to the Contract until either she regains the Crown or raises her Wyrd to a high enough level. True Fae may possess up to one Imperial Contract for each Title owned, but any of the Gentry with more than one or two is vanishingly rare and more-than-ample reason to worry. Hobgoblins, Fae-Touched, and [REDACTED] may never obtain Imperial Contracts.

    An Imperial Contract costs 7 Experiences to learn. A changeling could theoretically enter into Pupil’s Devotion with one of the Gentry in order to obtain one, but, well. . . would you?

    Unsolid Flesh

    The Lost possess a wide suite of abilities to transform themselves, their tools, and even the scenery around them, but other sentient beings? Not so much. That’s the domain of the Other Place, where properties are a little less sticky than on Earth. By means of this Imperial Contract, the changeling brings the mutability of Arcadia with her wherever she goes.

    A changeling may target herself with this Contract, in which case no roll is required.

    Cost: 5 Glamour + 1 Willpower (optional)

    Action: Instant

    Dice Pool: Intelligence + Animal Ken + Wyrd vs Resolve + Wyrd

    Duration: Until the sun next crosses the horizon

    Success: The Lost curses her victim with the form of an animal no larger than Size 4, and no smaller than about that of a frog. If the user wishes, she may still allow the subject to speak with a human voice.

    If the fae spends a point of Willpower, she may transform the subject into a chimerical creation, a living form with no biological counterpart, even a mythological creature such as a qirin or tragelaphus, though lacking any inherent supernatural qualities.

    While inside the Hedge, the fae may instead transform her target into a hobgoblin, either a known variety or something completely novel. Mortals and other beings lacking Supernatural Potency gain a Wyrd rating of 1, while other entities translate their Potency trait into a Wyrd of equal amount. Beyond and within this, the fae chooses Contracts, Dread Powers, Aspiration, and the like as she desires, or she can leave it up to the Hedge to decide. Unlike with mortal animal transformations, there is no Size restriction.

    Exceptional Success: The subject becomes lost in the instincts of his new form, gaining the Bestial Condition. If turned into a hobgoblin, the subject gains an additional major taboo against causing the fae harm.

    Failure: The curse finds no purchase.

    Dramatic Failure: The Contract fails, and the subject is immune to its power until the end of the next chapter.

    Loophole: The subject has offended the changeling in some way in the same scene. This can be as small as a minor annoyance, such as talking over her or not addressing her by her preferred name, but it must be a real grievance. Petty or conniving fae go out of their way to engineer such offenses.

    There exists a variant of this Contract as well which transforms its victims into inanimate (albeit still cognizant) objects of Size 5 or less; its dice pool instead uses Crafts, and the caster may choose whether or not the subject may still move on their own accord. On an exceptional success, the changeling adds half her Wyrd rating (rounded up) as an equipment bonus when wielding the victim as a tool. Within the Hedge, the fae may instead transform the victim into a token of her own design, with a dot rating less than or equal to successes rolled; an exceptional success shields her from the item’s drawback.


    The Endless Tapestry

    Fae magic is always fleeting, gone before you know it, in the blink of an eye like a dream on the rising sun. Nothing glamorous can stay in a world of iron, but that doesn’t mean the Wyrd can’t be bribed to look the other way for just a minute more, and then another, and then another.

    Cost: 3 or 7 Glamour + 1 Willpower (optional)

    Action: Instant

    Dice Pool: None

    For 3 Glamour, the changeling adds one iteration of duration to one of her active Contracts. An effect that lasts for one scene now lasts for two scenes, and one that endures until the sun crosses the horizon will only fade after two such crossings. This Contract may be used multiple times to extend the duration of an enchantment indefinitely (so long as the Lost has the Glamour to spare).

    For 7 Glamour, a targeted Contract instead now lasts for a year and a day. However, the changeling must specify a particular event or condition that will cause the magic to end. Such conditions might be the target apologizing sincerely to the changeling, the Rams winning the Super Bowl, a solar eclipse, the crowning of a new Autumn Queen, and so on. The stipulated event can have a one-in-a-million chance of happening, but the possibility for its arrival must exist, no matter how slim. In addition, if the subject of a Contract enhanced in this way suffers at least one point of lethal damage from cold iron, the enchantment immediately breaks. A fae can maintain a number of lengthened Contracts at one time equal to half her Wyrd rating, rounded up.

    By spending a point of Willpower, the changeling can bestow the effects of this Contract on the magics of another fae, either while in the same scene as the targeted magic, or the original caster of such. This only works on Contracts and not other supernatural abilities such as vampiric Disciplines.

    Loophole: The changeling is extending the length of a Contract at the behest of another, who has offered a commensurate price for the favor. The fae does not have to actually collect on the fee, but it must be set on the table willingly.


    Cutting the Gordian Knot

    As a changeling grows in power and age, he often finds himself at the heart of a tangled web of promises, oaths, and foreswearings ever more complicated and perilous to navigate. The magic of this Imperial Contract empowers a Lost to simply walk away, say goodbye to all that, and start anew. Maybe if he’s feeling generous, he’ll even let his creditors know about it.

    Cost: 5 Glamour per pledge + 1 Willpower

    Action: Instant

    Dice Pool: Manipulation + Politics + Wyrd - Highest Wyrd rating among affected subjects

    Success: The changeling is immediately freed from as many magical promises as he has paid Glamour for, including not only Wyrd-bound pledges, but also other forms of promise magic such as Invictus Oaths or certain Fate Arcanum spells. Other parties involved in these promises are none the wiser to this trick, and are still compelled to uphold their end of the bargain or suffer the consequences. This Contract has no effect on pledges made with Rank 6+ beings. It does work on pledges sworn with the True Fae, but any Gentry are immediately alerted to the fact that they’ve just been bamboozled by an upstart fugitive.

    The changeling may alternatively use successes rolled to pay off Goblin Debt on a one-for-one basis.

    This Contract provides no relief against any prospective Clarity attacks that arise from the changeling breaking his word.

    Exceptional Success: The changeling gains +1 Armor against any Clarity attacks provoked from breaking promises he’s wriggled out of for the rest of the chapter. A True Fae learns the true name of one subject whose pledge it has shirked.

    Failure: The changeling remains stuck.

    Dramatic Failure: Not only is the Lost still bound to his word, the Wyrd immediately sticks him with the Oathbreaker Condition in retribution for his failed escape attempt. A True Fae who dramatically fails in using this Contract is immediately stripped of its offending Title.

    Loophole: None. The Wyrd always takes its due for such gross disregard of its like basic fucking rules, I mean how crass can you be? Get the fuck outta here and be glad you got off this easy.


    An Interlude’s Whisper

    Dreams are fragile beauties: Touch them the wrong way and they break, all your hard work for naught. By drawing on the semi-ephemeral existence of all things fae, a changeling can preserve their psychic handicrafts over multiple nights until they manage to perfect their masterpiece.

    Cost: 3 Glamour

    Action: Instant

    Dice Pool: None

    The fae activates this Contract while within a Bastion whose dreamer is in the process of waking. Instead of ejecting from the dissolving dream, the user fades into the background of the subject’s psyche, existing only as a faint whisper in the recesses of the mind. During this time, the user exists in her own dreamlike state, partially aware of what the subject is up to but unable to act, outside of resolving her current Shift Condition, which both takes effect and shunts her back onto the Dreaming Roads unless she spends a point of Willpower to remain dematerialized. When the subject next sleeps and dreams, the user reforms, keeping any Shift Condition she has maintained and Dreamweaving successes she has banked. For every consecutive use of this Contract on the same subject, reduce the Composure-derived penalty for dreamweaving actions by one die. If used inside a Bastion containing a Huntsman’s heart, consecutive uses additionally reduce the number of required successes to locate it by one.

    A changeling who uses this Contract after passing through the Gate of Ivory risks deprivation if enough time passes.

    In addition, merely possessing this Contract allows a fae to add half her Wyrd rating (rounded up) to the maximum number of successes she can bank while Dreamweaving.

    Loophole: The fae uses this Contract in the Bastion of a character with whom she has an active pledge.


    Bewitchery

    Ordinary mortals can’t behold the wonder and beauty of Faerie. It’s a shame, really. They’re missing out on so much. With the right song in their hearts, though—why, anything’s possible.

    This Contract can target any number of mortals (or other non-fae beings) that the changeling can perceive, and who can perceive her, at once. The glamour can be woven into a regular performance (such as a song or dance), with the fae selecting which specific members of the audience receive her blessing.

    Cost: 3 Glamour per subject

    Action: Instant

    Dice Pool: Presence + Expression + Wyrd vs Composure + Wyrd (if undesired)

    Duration: One week

    Success: All targets have their senses opened to the magic of the Wyrd, gaining the ability to see through the Mask. Mortals enchanted this way do not suffer Integrity breaking points for witnessing supernatural phenomena related to the fae. When this Contract expires, mortal subjects must succeed on a Resolve + Composure roll or their memories of their time bewitched become hazy and confused, as if everything fae they experienced was all but a dream. For the Contract’s duration, the changeling increases her impression level with all targets by one step; if her impression is already perfect, the target is treated as if having one less Door for the changeling’s Social Maneuvering attempts.

    Exceptional Success: The subjects become especially attuned to the Wyrd, gaining the Unseen Sense (Fae) Merit for the Contract’s duration. If a single mortal is the subject, the changeling may spend a Willpower dot to transform them into a Fae-Touched. If the target has an appropriate pledge with the changeling, they also may gain an appropriate Vow Merit. This transformation is permanent, but unravels if the character ever suffers at least one point of lethal damage from cold iron.

    Failure: The performance may be charming, but the enchantment doesn’t take hold.

    Dramatic Failure: The enchantment backfires. The changeling loses the ability to see through the Mask or sense Hedgeways until the sun next crosses the horizon, and immediately unleashes Bedlam with a number of automatic successes equal to half her Wyrd score (rounded up). She may end this effect early if she inflicts at least a point of aggravated damage upon herself with cold iron. A True Fae that dramatically fails this Contract while in the mortal realm may risk becoming a Charlatan.

    Loophole: Each subject has made a sincere declaration of loyalty, friendship, or love to the changeling.


    Corridors of Chronos

    The relationship between Arcadia and mortal perceptions of time is tenuous at best. Normally the Lost have no control over these temporal wendings, and even the Gentry seem disinterested in keeping track of whether a day or a decade has passed Ironside for a mortal plaything. With the proper bargains, however, one can use the Hedge as a passageway not just between points in space, but those in time as well.

    Cost: 5 Glamour + 1 Willpower

    Action: Instant

    Dice Pool: None

    The fae activates this Contract at the beginning of a Hedge Navigation attempt, declaring a point in the past or future he wishes to achieve. Add required successes to the chase based on the scope of the time travel:
    Measured in hours +1
    Measured in days +2
    Measured in weeks +3
    Measured in months +4
    Measured in years +5
    The scope of a temporal journey is limited by the fae’s Wyrd rating: A Wyrd 6 changeling can go forward or backward in time by 6 hours, or 6 days, or so on. If the period of time desired lies outside the character’s Wyrd, move the scope up one step on the chart, maxing out at the character’s Wyrd in years. The effects of this Contract are limited to Earthly time; the user can’t tamper with the flow of the Hedge, Arcadia, or stranger realms.

    If the changeling successfully navigates the Hedge, he finds a portal back to Earth opening onto the time period specified. The fae, along with anyone accompanying him, may step through into the past or future. Although the past is the past as it happened, the future the changeling enters represents only the most likely outcome out of all possible based on the circumstances of the (objective) present. A changeling who interacts with his past self suffers a Clarity attack with a base pool of three dice (modified up or down depending on the nature of the interaction). A character cannot use this Contract to prevent a changeling’s Durance; attempts to do so always end in the mortal being taken to Faerie in some other fashion, or even worse fates besides.

    The Contract lasts until the character next reenters the Hedge, or enough time passes that the past catches up to the present. Any changes made to the past then become set.

    Loophole: The changeling holds an object with an important connection to the desired timeframe. If lost while in the past or future, the Loophole is revoked.

    --
    Sidebar: Dreams of Dead Fairies

    If a changeling enters the Hedge in dream form while time traveling (usually by leaving a Bastion and stepping off the Dreaming Roads), things get a little thornier. If from the future, the changeling’s unconscious body fades away from the possible timeline, and when the fae exists the Hedge proper, she finds herself back in her physical form.

    If the changeling enters the Hedge in dream form from the past, her sleeping body grows still and silent, perfectly preserved like an incorrupt saint. The bodies of high-Wyrd changelings sometimes take on aspects of their seeming during this time, such as an Elemental turning into a stone statue, or a Darkling a shadow blackened onto a wall. The Wyrd conspires to keep these bodies safe, mostly, though accidents and meddlers in fate do still happen from time to time. The comatose body has a Durability equal to half the changeling’s Wyrd (rounded up) and Structure equal to Health. When the changeling next finds her way out of the Hedge, it is always at the site of her body, which she automatically rejoins.

    Curiously, the comatose body can be awakened early by a mortal with some connection to the fae, such as a family member, close friend, bitter rival, or hard-boiled occultist, through a moment of intimate contact and the sharing of fluids such as tears or a drop of blood. The changeling then rises, somewhat Fetch-like, acting in accordance with her Needle, Thread, and any pledges she has sworn. The person who woke her gains a perfect impression for Social Maneuvering during this time. A sleepwalker cannot gain or spend Willpower, and any Glamour spent is taken from the dream form’s own reserve. The Hedge always alerts the Lost when this has happened, through an image in a pool, the shape of a flight of sparrows, or the sudden appearance of a soothsaying hob. This effect concludes once the changeling finds her way out of the Hedge and back into her own body, as above.

    If a changeling’s comatose body is destroyed, she’s trapped in the Hedge until she can spin herself a new one (see Oak, Ash, and Thorn).
    --

    Editing the Script

    All magic alters the ebb and flow of fate. Every drop of tainted blood, every snarl of spiritual dominance, every spark of divine machinery tugs on the threads of destinies both great and small, individual and collective. The sidereal Wyrd sees all of this, and with careful attunement, a cunning fae can learn to reweave any enchantment, spinning an escape clause to a baleful curse, or sneaking a nasty twist into a blessing.

    Cost: 7 or 13 Glamour + 1 Willpower (for non-Arcadian magic)

    Action: Instant

    Dice Pool: Wits + Occult + Wyrd vs Resolve + Wyrd

    Duration: Until the sun next crosses the horizon

    This Contract targets one supernatural effect the fae can perceive, and whose details are known to him (such as through a successful Kenning roll). The effect must be the result of a discrete ability enacted with intent, such as a Nightmare, Transmutation, or Exploit, and not an inherent or emergent property of a being or the landscape, such as an Arisen tomb’s Lifeweb or a werewolf’s regeneration. The qualification of a Deviant’s Variations is left to Storyteller discretion. This can affect the powers of Rank 6+ entities when applicable, but such beings are more often than not altered to the fact that someone is meddling in their affairs.

    Success: The changeling may add or alter a single detail to the supernatural effect. This can’t de facto nullify a power, though it can restrict its use: For example, a changeling can’t use this Contract to stop a mummy from calling down a meteor strike with the Secrets Ripped From the Skies Utterance, but he could use it to stipulate that the falling space debris will only hit empty buildings or people who have broken a promise in the past week. If a numerical value is included, the fae can alter it up or down by up to half his Wyrd rating (rounded up), potentially turning a bonus into a penalty, or vice versa.

    Listed below are some examples of what this Contract can accomplish:
    • Changing the particulars of a mage’s Conditional Duration Attainment into a different condition of similar probability.
    • Stipulating that a changeling using the Chrysalis Contract finds their higher-order reasoning subsumed by the instincts of their animal form.
    • Defining a command that a victim of the Dominate Discipline may choose to ignore.
    • Providing the means for a werewolf to extend the duration of the Chain Rage rite.
    • Altering the Merit a demon receives from the Allies Into Gold Exploit.
    • Naming an action that a Claimed victim may take to suppress the possession for a scene.
    • Presenting an amulet that allows its bearer to issue commands to undead thralls created by a mummy’s Awaken the Dead Utterance.
    Note that unless otherwise accounted for, this does not take the altered effect out of the user’s control—a mage might simply cancel a spell that’s been meddled with and recast it—and so the most effective uses of Editing the Script require a measure of finesse and forward-thinking to pull off. This Contract cannot be used on any magical effect that involves iron in any capacity, whether the target is made of the metal, it’s used as a Yantra or other ritual tool, or so on.

    If the fae spends 13 Glamour, this Contract instead preemptively enchants one of the target’s supernatural powers, so that its effects are altered in the same stipulated way every time it is activated for the Contract’s duration. For instance, a changeling could curse a mage so that her Word of Command spell has no effect on tokens, or make a Beast suffer from a certain Condition every time he uses the You Are Lost Nightmare. The fae must speak the change aloud to at least one other listener (usually the victim since they’re already in the scene anyway, but it could just as easily be whispered in the ear of an onlooking third party), or instead write it down. This power ends immediately if a written injunction is erased or destroyed, or if the subject takes at least one point of lethal damage from cold iron.

    Exceptional Success: The alteration lasts for the entire duration of the affected magic, or until the fae dies, whichever comes first.

    Failure: The power remains unaltered, which might be the least of the fae’s problems now.

    Dramatic Failure: Not only does the Contract fail to take effect, but the Wyrd denies the user the chance to contest, resist, or withstand the next three supernatural actions the target takes against the fae until the end of the next chapter.

    Loophole: The fae is using this Contract to save the life or at least well-being of an individual who has performed for him a favor. Each enchantment requires a separate favor.
    Last edited by espritdecalmar; 03-10-2021, 09:47 AM.

  • #2
    Between the Clarity “cost” of these and how you can only ever know one I think they should be cheaper to learn. 5 XP perhaps?

    Corridors of Chronos should have an option to stay in the future permanently, effectively turning it into “Decide how much Ironside time your Hedge journey takes (yes you can choose 0).”

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by espritdecalmar View Post

      Systems

      A True Fae can use an Imperial Contract without satisfying the Loophole three times per story, after which it is barred to them.

      ...

      True Fae may possess up to one Imperial Contract for each Title owned, but any of the Gentry with more than one or two is vanishingly rare and more-than-ample reason to worry.

      ...

      An Imperial Contract costs 7 Experiences to learn. A changeling could theoretically enter into Pupil’s Devotion with one of the Gentry in order to obtain one, but, well. . . would you?

      ...

      Cutting the Gordian Knot

      As a changeling grows in power and age, he often finds himself at the heart of a tangled web of promises, oaths, and foreswearings ever more complicated and perilous to navigate. The magic of this Imperial Contract empowers a Lost to simply walk away, say goodbye to all that, and start anew. Maybe if he’s feeling generous, he’ll even let his creditors know about it.

      Cost: 5 Glamour per pledge + 1 Willpower

      Action: Instant

      Dice Pool: Manipulation + Politics + Wyrd - Highest Wyrd rating among affected subjects

      Success: The changeling is immediately freed from as many magical promises as he has paid Glamour for, including not only Wyrd-bound pledges, but also other forms of promise magic such as Invictus Oaths or certain Fate Arcanum spells. Other parties involved in these promises are none the wiser to this trick, and are still compelled to uphold their end of the bargain or suffer the consequences. This Contract has no effect on pledges made with Rank 6+ beings. It does work on pledges sworn with the True Fae, but any Gentry are immediately alerted to the fact that they’ve just been bamboozled by an upstart fugitive.

      The changeling may alternatively use successes rolled to pay off Goblin Debt on a one-for-one basis.

      This Contract provides no relief against any prospective Clarity attacks that arise from the changeling breaking his word.

      Exceptional Success: The changeling gains +1 Armor against any Clarity attacks provoked from breaking promises he’s wriggled out of for the rest of the chapter. A True Fae learns the true name of one subject whose pledge it has shirked.

      Failure: The changeling remains stuck.

      Dramatic Failure: Not only is the Lost still bound to his word, the Wyrd immediately sticks him with the Oathbreaker Condition in retribution for his failed escape attempt. A True Fae who dramatically fails in using this Contract is immediately stripped of its offending Title.

      Loophole: None. The Wyrd always takes its due for such gross disregard of its like basic fucking rules, I mean how crass can you be? Get the fuck outta here and be glad you got off this easy.

      I love this entire concept and most of the examples you've given. However, I have issues with this one specifically, for thematic and balance reasons.

      In terms of balance: One of the best and most thematic methods to put one over on a True Fae is to get them tangled up in contradictory Oaths. A Story for most games is not going to take more than a year or two. True Fae have lived far longer than that and start every scene with a full Glamour pool while in Arcadia. With each use, they could rid themselves of up to 12 Oaths over the course of a single Story even if they have no Titles (the number goes up with each Title). If they are doing this in Arcadia, they don't even have to do plot relevant things to obtain the necessary glamour. Thus, with this Contract, there's no guarantee that the old Oath a PC finds in some old flesh-bound grimoire will still have any effect on the Gentry.

      I understand the main counterargument to this: True Fae are NPCs. They are controlled by the ST and an ST working in bad faith would not even need this Contract to make a True Fae unbeatable. An ST working in good faith would leave enough Oaths unbroken for clever players to manipulate because that is what is fun. However, that leads me to

      Thematic problems: Gentry are even more beings of the Wyrd than Changelings. The Wyrd is the force of binding agreements. Why would the Wyrd provide a Contract that lets beings break its, as you say, "basic fucking rules"? And while True Fae are not just their Titles, they are defined by their Titles largely. Titles that are massive Oaths and Bargains manifesting as physical magic. The Oaths and Bargains are lynchpins that hold up the Title. And beyond that, nothing in 2e yet contradicts 1e's theory that the True Fae bargained with the universe itself to paradoxically bring themselves into existence. Thus, on a very basic level, they are beings not just bound, but defined by agreements. Just like a spirit cannot disobey its Ban while a Werewolf can, a True Fae should not be able to break agreements they made un purpose. I'd argue that they might even have trouble comprehending the concept of doing so outright (though abusing agreements is well-understood).

      So, I personally would just not use this Contract, but I'd also be willing to see how you could further restrict it as a compromise. Perhaps only make it available to Changelings? Have it require bargaining with esoteric forces antithetical to the Wyrd?


      A god is just a monster you kneel to. - ArcaneArts, Quoting "Fall of Gods"

      Comment


      • #4
        Just for flavor alone this is quite interesting. Would the bargain required possibly use a similar approach as founding a court?

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Master Aquatosic View Post


          I love this entire concept and most of the examples you've given. However, I have issues with this one specifically, for thematic and balance reasons.

          . . .

          So, I personally would just not use this Contract, but I'd also be willing to see how you could further restrict it as a compromise. Perhaps only make it available to Changelings? Have it require bargaining with esoteric forces antithetical to the Wyrd?
          It's the Contract I'm most unsure of out of the current batch. You're right that more careful scrutiny is required. An alternative idea: Like Editing the Script, it allows the user to change a single detail of a sworn pledge, generally by stipulating an exception ("Oh, you said I can't hurt them, but surely dream-poisoning isn't really harm if it makes their lives all the sweeter. . ."). Still no Loophole because the Wyrd isn't happy that the Fae managed to get this one out of it (How they did it, well, you'd ask to ask someone who was there. Maybe one of the Huntsmen. . .).

          I'm actually starting to waver into the notion that ICs shouldn't cost XP at all, and instead the acquisition must always be framed as a story in-itself. Or maybe that giving up Experiences means something a little more literal in this case.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by espritdecalmar View Post

            It's the Contract I'm most unsure of out of the current batch. You're right that more careful scrutiny is required. An alternative idea: Like Editing the Script, it allows the user to change a single detail of a sworn pledge, generally by stipulating an exception ("Oh, you said I can't hurt them, but surely dream-poisoning isn't really harm if it makes their lives all the sweeter. . .&quot. Still no Loophole because the Wyrd isn't happy that the Fae managed to get this one out of it (How they did it, well, you'd ask to ask someone who was there. Maybe one of the Huntsmen. . .).
            You don't need a Contract for that. Just 1000s of uears of experience in sneakily wording agreements even when you seem to be in no position to bargain


            A god is just a monster you kneel to. - ArcaneArts, Quoting "Fall of Gods"

            Comment


            • #7
              The only alteration to a pledge I can even remotely imagine the Wyrd begrudgingly countenancing is “Replace one of your obligations with a different but comparatively onerous one,” and even then only if the Contract is changeling-only because, like Master Aquatosic said, a true fae or a hob should always still be good for that promise they made one thousand years ago.

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