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  • New Goblin Contracts

    [Migrating old material I've created to the new forums]

    Hello everyone! So, this is sort of my bizarre brain-child from Blood Sorcery -- I had originally intended to make a changeling sorcery, but then I realized that I've been moving away from the very free-form styles of spellcasting there involved. So instead, I decided to take the things I had in mind for effects and simply turn them into a mass of goblin contracts. So... here they are!

    These contracts are powerful (the idea was to be able to make more of a Baba Yaga type character possible), but one may notice that a couple of them actually have dot ratings of 6+, which would require the usual limitations on having a high Wyrd rating. Others just have fairly significant drawbacks.

    In any case, tell me what you think! Balanced, not balanced, any potential rules-issues, and any other interesting faerie-tale powers you think I should write up?


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    Bottom's Predicament (•••)
    Bottom's Predicament (•••)

    For understandable reasons, Shakespeare is often the favorite author of the Lost, and A Midsummer Night's Dream is his most popular work. Thus, whatever original name this ancient enchantment had in years gone by, (and it is a very old enchantment), modern Changelings invariably call it Bottom's Predicament.

    With this spell, a changeling sorcerer is able to give the target the head of an ass (or a frog, or a goat, or a leopard, or what-have-you), or at least some of the features thereof. This transformation is only visible to the Fair Folk (and to the target), but even the unensorcelled notice the target taking on some unattractive habits.

    Cost: 3 Glamour
    Dice Pool: Animal Ken+Wyrd-Target's Composure
    Action: Instant
    Catch: The target is asleep.

    Dramatic Failure: The curse rebounds on the caster, giving them the head of an animal, and a -3 penalty to all social roll.
    Failure: The curse fails to take effect.
    Success: The target takes on some of the features of an animal, chosen by the sorcerer. A man cursed to become more like a swine loses his sense of personal hygiene and becomes needlessly greedy and gluttonous, while a man cursed to become wolfish turns ruthless and cruel (note that this is based on a folkloric perception of the animal, not on the animal itself). No matter what the animal, however, the traits are always unpleasant to those around them. The target suffers a penalty equal to (Successes) on all social rolls until the sun next crosses the horizon (until the next dawn or dusk, that is).

    To the Ensorcelled, the target's head also seems to take on some of the features of the animal (the more successes rolled, the greater the likeness). Those cursed to become like pigs become jowly, their eyes sunken into their flesh, while those cursed to be like toads find their skin turning warty and their eyes bulging out. The unensorcelled may notice some mild changes but will never think them anything odd or supernatural. The target may be mildly concerned, but unless they are Ensorcelled, they too consider it unimportant.

    Unfortunately, Shakespeare's faeries were never the most perceptive of sorts, cursing the wrong people and succumbing to love potions, and so the user of this contract suffers a -2 penalty to all Wits rolls for the duration of the effect. If they use it on more than one person, then they receive further penalties, which stack.

    Exceptional Success: Aside from inflicting higher penalties, if the sorcerer rolls five or more successes then the Ensorcelled will perceive the target as having not just the likeness, but the very head of an animal. The unensorcelled still see nothing wrong, and even an unensorcelled target will take it in stride and soon forget about it.

    Suggested Modifier
    Modifier | Situation
    +1 to +3 | The proposed transformation is symbolically appropriate (a glutton into a pig, a warrior into a wolf)
    -1 to -3 | The proposed transformation is noticeably symbolically in-appropriate (a glutton into a stork, a warrior into a rabbit)


    Circe's Curse (•••••)
    Circe's Curse (•••••)

    Unlike it's "little brother" spell, Circe's Curse is no laughing matter. It draws its name from the ancient story of Odysseus, who landed upon the island of Circe, a daughter of Helios (or perhaps Hekate). She turned his men into swine, and Odysseus escaped only with divine help. There are other stories like it, such as the famous tale of the Frog Prince, or the lesser known story of the White Cat.

    Of course, in these less supernatural times, the thought of a faerie sorcerer keeping someone transformed for months or years is absurd, and changelings (mostly) don't believe it. Still, better safe than sorry.

    In order to use this contract, the changeling must be within (Wyrd) yards of the target, and must either look them directly in the eye, or must say their name loudly – this does not have to be their True Name.

    Cost: 4 Glamour + 1 Willpower
    Dice Pool: Manipulation+Wyrd vs. Resolve+Supernatural Resistance
    Action: Instant
    Catch: The target has transgressed -- in a spectacularly sacrilegious manner --against the caster. Robbery or murder is insufficient, unless combined with something such as the abuse of an oath of hospitality, parricide, cannibalism, or some similar defliement (look at Morality 1 sins and Ancient Greek tragedies for a good idea of the kinds of things that trigger this catch).

    Dramatic Failure: The curse goes awry, partially transforming the spellcaster into an animal, changing hands into paws, twisting backs and deforming tongues, inflicting a -3 penalty to all physical and social rolls for the rest of the scene.
    Failure: The curse fails.
    Success: For the rest of the scene, the target is turned into an animal. They may be transformed into any animal from a mouse up to a horse. Unless transformed into something like a monkey or a parrot, the target loses their ability to speak and loses its opposable thumbs (and thus any ability to easily use tools or weapons).

    Aside from a change in Size (and the accompanying bonuses to stealth), they retain all of their attributes, skills, and traits. A man turned into a frog becomes an exceptionally sturdy frog. They also retain all supernatural abilities. That said, their lack of thumbs or speech may render many powers and skills impossible to use. A cat may not fire a pistol, for instance, at least with any hope of hitting something, and communication barriers prevent Vainglory 5: Words of Memories Never Lived from being used for much.

    Fortunately, their curse comes with a certain level of inviolability. The Wyrd considers Circe's Curse punishment enough. First, if anyone harms the target before the end of the scene (inflicting 1 or more lethal damage), then the curse is broken. And if the caster harms the target before the end of the scene, then the curse rebounds back to them, transforming them into some manner of animal instead (though with the same inviolability). For this reason the transformation cannot be such as would automatically kill the target (turning someone into a fish on dry land, say).

    Exceptional Success: At the end of the duration, the spellcaster may pay the cost of Circe's Curse to extend it for an additional scene. The caster may extend it indefinitely, providing they are willing to pay the glamour and willpower. Of course, if the catch applies, then the curse may be extended indefinitely... leading to legends such as those of Circe herself.

    Suggested Modifier
    Modifier | Situation
    +1 to +3 | The proposed transformation is symbolically appropriate (a glutton into a pig, a warrior into a wolf)
    -1 to -3 | The proposed transformation is noticeably symbolically in-appropriate (a glutton into a stork, a warrior into a rabbit)
    +3 | The changeling sorcerer uses the target’s True Name in their spell.




    GM of the Walking Shadow Campaigns
    New System and Setting Material

  • #2
    Phantasmagoria (••••)
    Phantasmagoria (••••)

    In the late 18th and through the 19th centuries, phantasmagoria was a kind of theater, where a performer would use a magic lantern to project various terrifying images upon a wall, depicting ghosts or demons or skeletons cavorting. The cleverest of performers projected the images onto smoke, and used multiple small, moving projectors to create a semblance of movement, three-dimensionality, and ghastly liveliness to the spectacle. One early 19th century Belgian inventor, Étienne-Gaspard "Robertson" Robert, staged his phantasmagoria in the abandoned crypt of a Capuchin Monastery, and was once stopped by the police before he could bring back the spirit of Louis XVI.

    Of course, Robertson's phantasmagoria were only technological tricks (probably). With this power, however, a changeling can take shadow-puppets and give them a semblance of life and mobility, turning them into three-dimensional illusions that can affect all of the senses, and obey the changeling's whim.

    To use this power, the changeling must first have some suitable shadows at hand (meaning that this power cannot be cast in absolute light or darkness, where there are no shadows). The shadows need to have at least a vague resemblance to the desired illusion, so most changelings that use Phantasmagoria either carry paper cutouts and flashlights, or else grow skilled at making shadow-puppets with their hands.

    Cost: 3 Glamour (+1 Willpower, optional)
    Dice Pool: Subterfuge+Wyrd
    Action: Instant
    Catch: The changeling uses the shadow puppets created by a magic lantern projector, which must remain running so long as the illusions are active.

    Dramatic Failure: The changeling loses themselves in shadows and illusions, momentarily losing their grip on reality. This is a Clarity 6 Breaking point.
    Failure: The shadows remain stubbornly shadows, and not illusions.
    Success: The shadow-puppets transform into three-dimensional illusions, encompassing one or more senses. Anything at all is possible, from simply creating a painting on a wall that had not been there before, to simulating a full-scale SWAT team assault. A changeling can create a rotting corpse, a bed of roses, the Lord Mayor of London, a fire-breathing dragon, himself, his Keeper, a bathing nude, a sword, whatever his imagination can encompass.

    Each use of this power creates a single discrete illusion no larger than (Successes x Wyrd) in cubic yards. This is either a single object or person, or a small group that stays very close together (such as the aforementioned SWAT team). Each illusion must have a single, coherent subject. Thus one could not summon both a bed of roses and a SWAT team with a single casting of this power, though one could summon a SWAT team with their armored van, for instance.

    Illusions may encompass up to all 5 senses, but they are intangible and unable to affect the real world. Anyone interacting with an illusion may roll Wits+Investigation(+any supernatural sensory tricks such as Auspex) to realize its unreality (opposed by the illusion's Successes). Illusions cannot physically harm anyone, though they can be distracting, inflicting up to (Successes) penalty on sensory rolls (an illusory orchestra can make it difficult to hear).

    Illusions can be made to move. If the caster is present, he may direct the illusions with but a thought. He can also leave 'programming' instructing a river to continue to flow, or an illusory guard dog to patrol a corridor. Illusions have no ability to respond to stimuli.

    Illusions last for the remainder of the scene. If the changeling spends one point of willpower, however, the illusions last until the next dawn or dusk.

    The drawback of dealing with such illusions, however, is that the changeling divorces themselves from reality and the idea of what is true and what is not. They automatically dramatically fail the next perception check they are called upon to make.

    Exceptional Success: Extra successes are their own reward, creating illusions that are difficult to tell for what they are.

    Suggested Modifier
    Modifier | Situation
    -1 to -4 | For each sense past the first that the illusion encompasses.
    +3 | The illusion is static and unmoving.
    +2 | The illusion is used to frighten.


    Playing the Piper (•••••)
    Playing the Piper (•••••)

    Fairy Tales, as any changeling will tell you, are not nice. But few are quite as horrific as that of the Pied Piper of Hamelin, the rat catcher who took all of a town's children away, never to be seen again, when the town reneged on its promise to pay him. With this dark piece of goblin magic, one of the Lost can Play the Piper, charming away a town's rats... or a town's children... with his music. If he doesn't mind risking his own death, that is.

    Despite the extremely fell reputation this magic has, it can actually be a beneficial one. It can be used to pipe away vermin of all types, whether one is talking about rats or flesh-eating bacteria, and destroying them. It's just that when that same piece of magic can be used to massacre scores of children, people tend to look at it askance. In order to use this contract, the changeling must be singing or playing some manner of instrument.

    Cost: 4 Glamour
    Dice Pool: Expression+Wyrd vs. highest Resolve+Composure of those summoned
    Action: Extended (Special; each roll represents ten minutes of playing music)
    Catch: The contract is being used to take vengeance on someone who has cheated the Piper.

    Dramatic Failure: The summoning works, and the target is drawn to
    Failure: The summoning fails.
    Success: The Piper gathers all of a specific kind of 'vermin' to himself, drawing them from an area up to (Wyrd x 100) yards away, though the Piper can choose to work in a smaller area. Once gathered, the Piper may instruct the summoned vermin to follow him, to move to a specific area within hearing range, or to disperse back to where they came from, so long as he keeps playing (making one Wyrd+Expression roll every five minutes, which he can do without end, unlike normal extended action rolls). For the purposes of this contract, vermin may be rats, pigeons, insects, stray dogs or cats, germs or bacteria, or even children (which says something about how children were viewed when the contract was written).

    The contract is really as simple as that, and gives the Piper no further power over those summoned beyond the ability to move them about.

    Summoned vermin arrive under their own power, as quickly as they can, though they cannot do impossible things in order to reach the Piper (laboratory rats cannot escape their cages, etc). They must also be actually present in the area -- summoning malaria while in the Rocky Mountains is unlikely to work. At all times, they are quiescent, and won't attack or infect the Piper or anyone else so long as the changeling keeps playing his music.

    This migration is unnoticed and unnoticeable by any who are not Ensorcelled -- the rats may swarm down the street in a carpet of grey fur six inches deep and no one will notice. Children will be assumed to be going to some kind of club, and even if the contract causes death or destruction, the Wyrd simply has it all explained away, no matter how improbable the explanation.

    The drawback to Playing the Piper is that the summoner is using their own life force to power this great magic. The Piper takes 1 point of Lethal Damage for each roll he takes. This is a vivid and bloody cost -- flutists and singers cough up gobbets of their lungs, violinists work their fingers to the bloody bone. And yet to Play the Piper is such a glorious feeling of creation, that it requires a Resolve roll to end the spell, to cancel the summoning or to not take one more command. Pipers have been known to die while using this contract.


    Exceptional Success: Gaining an exceptional success on any individual roll allows the Piper to avoid the lethal damage for that ten minute period.

    Suggested Modifier
    Modifier | Situation
    +5 | The Piper is using an instrument of exceptional value (a Stradivarius Violin) or one that he has crafted entirely out of human tissue (a flute of human bone) by hand
    +2 | The Piper is using an instrument that he has crafted by hand
    0 | The Piper is using a purchased instrument of good quality (costs Resources 3 or more)
    -2 | The Piper is using a purchased instrument of poor quality (costs Resources 2 or less)
    0 to -5 | Ambient noise (0 means silence, a busy street is a -2, next to a jet engine is -5)


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    • #3
      Poison Present (••••)
      Poison Present (••••)

      From Snow White with her poisoned apple and Sleeping Beauty (or Briar Rose) with her poisoned spindle, poisoned presents appear repeatedly in folklore and fairy tales. Of course, they've a long and proud pedigree before then, poison and witchcraft intertwined in story and myth. Medea poisoned her rival for Jason's love with a poisonous gown, and when the Bible pronounces 'Thou Shalt Not Suffer a Witch to Live', one alternative translation for 'Witch' is 'Poisoner'.

      They tend to be wicked types, these poisoners, cruel and vindictive. They're never poisoned by their own venoms, for poison knows its own. In the oldest myths (such as that of Medea), poisonous gifts lead to a direct and very nasty death, but the more modern version simply puts the victim into a death-like sleep, one from which they may never awaken.

      For obvious reasons, using this contract tends to lead to degeneration rolls, and knowledge of it is prohibited in most right-thinking freeholds. That said, there's always some foul Hedge-witch or cat-faced Hob willing to teach it, for a price.

      Cost: 3 Glamour
      Dice Pool: Medicine + Wyrd
      Action: Instant
      Catch: The poisoned object is a gift to the victim, offered and freely accepted.

      Dramatic Failure: The changeling botches the roll, poisoning themselves (still at a Toxicity equal to their Wyrd).
      Failure: The object is not poisoned.
      Success: This is a straightforward contract. With a touch, the changeling poisons a single object of no more than Size 3 (such as an apple, a comb, a spindle, a dress). The poison has a Toxicity equal to the changeling's Wyrd. The object remains poisoned for 24 hours, and has symptoms similar to that of a heart attack.

      When the object is used (an apple is eaten, a spindle touched, a dress put on, etc), some part of it lodges deep inside the victim's body (a splinter in a finger, a slice of poisoned apple in their throat). This triggers the poison, prompting the target to roll Resolve+Stamina, minus the poison's Toxicity. If they fail, they fall into a deep, enchanted sleep, a death-like coma for the next (Successes) Days - during which time they require no food, water, will not die from exposure (though they will if physically attacked), and are essentially in stasis. They may also be awakened if the poisoned object is somehow removed from their body (which usually requires an Int+Occult and a Dex+Medicine roll in opposition to the contract's successes).

      A few strange limitations apply to the poison's effectiveness. First, the caster is never affected by their own poison (as a product of their own wicked natures, they are immune to it). At the same time, the poison can never be forced on a target. A sword can be poisoned and given as a gift, and the recipient will then accidentally cut themselves and so poison themselves; but the sword cannot be poisoned and then used to stab someone. The poisoned apple must be willingly bitten, it cannot be force-fed. This contract is a tool of murder, not a weapon.

      The recipient of a poisoned gift may notice that something is off with a subconscious Wits+Occult roll, though the poisoner can soothe their fears (if they are present) with a Manipulation+Subterfuge roll. If the recipient succeeds on their roll, then they notice that something is 'off' about the object and will not want to use it, though they are unlikely to make the leap to 'poison'.

      Finally, the drawback of this goblin contract links into the link between poisoners and hags and crones. For one week after poisoning the object, the changeling suffers a -4 penalty to any rolls to seduce, beguile, entertain, or otherwise use their physical beauty (negating any Striking Looks bonus in the process). Additional uses of the contract extend the duration.

      Exceptional Success: The Toxicity of the poisoned gift is equal to the changeling's Wyrd+2, and if the target fails their resistance roll, they are enchanted into sleep for (Successes) Weeks.

      Suggested Modifier
      Modifier | Situation
      -2 | The object is very modern (invented within the last century) -- a cellphone, a can of soda.
      +2 | The object is old and mythologically potent (at least five hundred years old in style) -- an apple, a gown.


      Lost in the Woods (••••)
      Lost in the Woods (••••)

      Getting lost is an integral part of many faerie tales. Little Red Riding Hood strays from the path, Hansel and Gretel’s trail of bread crumbs are lost, Baba Yaga’s captive needs directions to get home. With this curse, the changeling can ensure that the target gets lost, and worse, that anyone with them gets led astray as well. If the targets are lucky, that’s all that happens to them… otherwise…

      To use this contract, the target must either be within visual range of the changeling, or the changeling must have a personal belonging of the target. They may decide to simply let the target get lost, or else may have the target’s feet lead them to a location of the changeling's choosing.

      Cost: 3 Glamour + 1 Willpower
      Dice Pool: Survival + Wyrd vs. Composure + Supernatural Tolerance (the roll occurs when the target sets out on a journey, not when the glamour and willpower cost is first paid).
      Action: Instant
      Catch: The target is travelling through woods or caves or some other area where there are no signs or roads or other markers.

      Dramatic Failure:
      Failure:
      Success:The roll occurs when the target next sets out on a journey – if they travel nowhere within the next 24 hours, the curse expires. If the target is travelling with a group (who share a point of origin and a destination, not simply that the target is taking a bus), then they gain a +1 bonus to their contested roll per additional person with them.

      If the target is simply enchanted to get lost, then for the duration of their journey, all travel times are multiplied by (Successes+1). If it normally takes the target a half hour to drive across the city, and the changeling gets 4 successes, then suddenly the target takes two and a half hours to get where they are going. If the target is tracking anything, then their Survival rolls are further penalized by (Successes), in addition to the travel time increase.

      Alternatively, the target finds themselves arriving at an area of the changeling’s choice. The target is not compelled to do anything when they arrive, but they do arrive. The chosen location must also be within a reasonable distance of the target – a target driving in New York may be led to a warehouse in Queens but not to a church in Omaha.

      The drawback is that meddling with time and space in such a way is dangerous; within the next month, an important message will fail to reach the target in time. This may be a plea for help, a lawyer’s subpoena, or simply an electrical bill, but its loss will noticeably and negatively impact the changeling’s life.

      Exceptional Success: The curse lasts for the next two journeys the target makes – either making two journeys slow, or foiling the first attempt of the target to leave the chosen location.

      Suggested Modifier
      Modifier | Situation
      +4 | The target has been specifically warned to stay to a path or to follow directions.
      +2 | The target is travelling to some place they have never been before.
      -2 | The target is travelling to a local landmark (City hall, the local public library).
      -4 | The target is travelling to a well-known, national landmark (the Eiffel Tower, Big Ben).



      GM of the Walking Shadow Campaigns
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      • #4
        Speak of the Devil (•••••)
        Speak of the Devil (•••••)

        Speak of the Devil, and he will come. Names are power among the Lost, and names are a greater power among the True Fae. Why do people never call the True Fae by their names? Why are they always the Fair Folk, the Good Neighbors, the Gentry, the Keeper? Some of it is for fear, assuredly, But not just fear of giving offense. There’s also fear that if the True Fae hear their names, from as far away as Arcadia, then they will come and find out just who is talking about them.

        The Gentry are the most famous practitioners of this magic, but they are not the only ones. With this contract, a powerful changeling can enchant their name as well, letting them know when people are talking about them.

        When using this contract, the changeling has to specify a specific name that is used for them – not necessarily their True Name, but one by which they are known. The contract lasts for one lunar month.

        Cost: 3 Glamour
        Dice Pool: Politics + Wyrd
        Action: Extended (10 successes; each roll represents ten minutes of incantation)
        Catch: The character is using their True Name.

        Dramatic Failure: Something goes disastrously wrong, and the changeling’s name echoes across the world. In Arcadia, their Keeper hears its echo, and knows precisely where the changeling is at the time of the failed incantation. The Lost had best make themselves scarce, and quickly.
        Failure: Nothing happens.
        Success: The contract lasts for one month, and has a radius equal to (Wyrd) in miles, and covers both the mortal world and the Hedge.

        Whenever anyone in the area says the changeling’s name (the one chosen by the caster of this contract), the changeling is made aware of it. It must be that specific name, though it can be just a portion of it – if the full name is Thomas Wright, then ‘Wright’ would qualify. The effect is only triggered if the people are talking about the changeling, further. Even if there are a thousand people named ‘Thomas’ in the city, the contract only picks up when Thomas Wright the Changeling is being spoken about.

        The first time any character says the changeling’s name in a scene, the changeling is merely made aware that ‘someone has said their name’. The second time any character says the changeling’s name in a scene, the changeling knows their rough direction (to the nearest cardinal or semi-cardinal direction) and rough distance (to the nearest quarter-mile), as well as whether the speaker is on earth or in the Hedge. The third time any character says the changeling’s name in a scene, the changeling know their precise direction and distance.

        The drawback to binding one name to the wind is both potent and subtle. By becoming more like the True Fae, able to hear their names on the wind, the character grows more susceptible to thinking like the True Fae, and suffers a -1 to all Clarity Degeneration rolls for the duration of the contract.

        Exceptional Success: The third time any character says the changeling’s name in a scene, the changeling is also given a rough idea of who is saying the name, “a middle-aged Caucasian policeman” or “a toad-faced hob” or “a Swimmerskin that looks like an otter.”

        Suggested Modifier
        Modifier | Situation
        -3 | The name is incredibly common: “John Smith” or “Michael Thompson”
        0 | The name is normal but not incredibly common in the area: “Sean Gillespie” or “Miss Bell”
        +2 | The name is very uncommon or noticeably foreign (in areas without large foreign communities): “Horace Murthwaite” or “Sergei Valentinovich Zaitsev”
        +4 | The name is some kind of faerie-tale name or title: “Mary O’Brine” or “The Jack of Crows”


        The Beggar Woman's Gift (•••••)
        The Beggar Woman's Gift (•••••)

        One repeated motif in faerie tales and myths is that the questing hero does a favor for someone mild and unassuming -- a rabbit caught in a snare is freed, an old woman is given the hero's meal -- and in return he receives some potent boon or blessing. With this contract, the changeling can bestow such a magical trinket onto another person, an unassuming object that nevertheless contains a sliver of their own power -- though by so doing they are themselves lessened.

        Cost: 3 Glamour + the activation cost of the chosen clause
        Dice Pool: Crafts + Wyrd
        Action: Extended (The selected Clause's level x2 successes; each roll represents one minute of fiddling with the object)
        Catch: The chosen recipient of the gift is not yet an adult (under 18 in most Western countries, though the definition may alter based on the culture -- unmarried is another common definition), and does not know about the supernatural world.

        Dramatic Failure:
        Failure: Nothing happens.
        Success: The changeling takes an object of no larger than Size 3 (a comb, a broom, a piece of bread) and imbues a single Contract clause into it, and then gives the object to the recipient, who must be another changeling, a mortal, or some other kind of faerie-entity (hobgoblin, fetch, etc). Thereafter, the next time the recipient uses the object (combs their hair, eats the bread), they are able to activate the contract -- even if they themselves are a mortal. They can set all parameters of the contract as if they were using it normally, but they use the changeling's dice pool for the activation roll and the cost of the contract is already paid.

        The object may not be given away to anyone else -- only the chosen recipient can use it. Further, if the object is stolen or otherwise illicitly taken, then it does work... but the stored contract's activation results in a Dramatic Failure.

        This gift last indefinitely, until the stored clause is used or until the changeling who gave it spends 1WP to revoke it. However, so long as the gift exists, and for a further 24 hours afterwards, the changeling is unable to use the stored clause -- they gave it away and it will take some time to find its way home.

        Exceptional Success: When the stored clause is used, it gains a +4 to the activation roll.

        Suggested Modifier
        Modifier | Situation
        -2 | The object in which the clause is stored is particularly ornate or valuable -- a golden ring, an iPhone
        +2 | The object in which the clause is stored is particularly homely or worthless -- a broken comb, an old pair of sneakers
        +5 | The recipient has just done an act of kindness even though it came at their own expense in some way; this does not apply if the act was carried out specifically so as to benefit from this contract.


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