Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The Office Of Vizieral Counsel (2E)

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • The Office Of Vizieral Counsel (2E)

    "My magic for my queen. Nothing else matters."

    The requirements to join an eldritch order such as this are quite steep. These are not for weak-kneed changelings still trying to find their way in this strange world, oh no. This entitlement is for those Lost who have found their paths, hewing somewhat to certain archetypes. This particular entitlement is what one might suggest to be the grandest of the grand, the eldest of the eldritch. This can most certainly be part of a changeling's "endgame," should the game grow to that point.

    The story of the Office of Vizieral Counsel began eons ago, with a lunatic known as Lailoken. As the story goes, he was as powerful a changeling as had walked this Earth. His Wyrd had infused his entire being. Drunk on power, Lailoken began to lose. well, perspective. Sanity dwindled, torn to fringed ribbon.

    He heard the lilting melodies and dissonant songs of Faerie drift upon the breeze calling to him, whispered out of some Hedge door somewhere, and he wondered just what it was that he was becoming. It went on like this for weeks, months, and soon he began to suffer blackouts. Upon waking one morning, he bolted upright to find himself in the midst of a field of coes: Bodies charred, beheaded, some turned to ice, others with trees grown up through their chests. Lailoken had enough sanity to recognize he had gone almost completely insane. He didn't remember killing these scores of people. But the blood on his hands--his fingertips still smoldering with steam, smoke, fog -- made his sins clear.

    As luck would have it, the local Summer Court king was having a pass by, hunting stag upon his horse. The King, the warrior known as Cantigernus, saw what had become of these people at the hands of the lunatic Lailoken. He thought to destroy Lailoken on the spot, and then... an idea struck him. He knew the tales of this sorcerer. He knew not only of what this man was capable, but also knew that this changeling had a grasp of the Wyrd that he himself might never have. And so he made the mad murderer an offer: If Lailoken would act as Cantigernus' advisor, he would not only spare his life but help pull him back from the brink -- rehabilitating him, keeping him saner if not precisely sane.

    Using his last shred of sanity, Lailoken judged the bargain as a good one, given that he had little interest in having his head at the end of a pike. He agreed, offering a pledge to seal the deal. Thus was born the eldritch order of the Office of Vizerial Counsel (known then and sometimes now as the "Kin of Lailoken" or simply, "The Lailokin"). The members of this order all act as sorcerer-advisors to the kings and queens of the freehold. It is their sole purpose. While not all of them are addled madmen capable of leveling an entire town with some long-forgotten clause of some heretical Contract, many are, and joining this order helps keep their perceptions clear.

    Titles: Vizier, Eternal Advisor, Lailokin (mainly in Europe)
    Prerequisites: Wyrd 7, Politics 3, Occult 3, Forever and a Day

    Joining: Most changelings that join the Entitlement do so at the summons of another: The Viziers offer the changeling a chance to join their esteemable ranks, and unlike many other noble orders, this offer doesn't come only once. They make the offer as many times as they're able, actually -- provided the subject hasn't gone off the deep end or earned himself such enmity that the whole freehold wants his heart on a stick, then they will continue to urge the character to join the Viziers. Some even stage "interventions" for particularly troubled and troublesome fae. Of course, such interventions often require iron shackles and a trip far away from the nearest gateway to the Thorns.

    Approach: As an arcane advisor, a Vizier is expected to use his powers in service to the courts while standing apart from its politics. Huntsmen and the True Fae exploit the Entitlement's Approach by manipulating the Vizier to betray the freehold's current ruler in a manner which would inflict grave harm. Often, this leads the changeling to attempt to seize the throne herself.

    Mien: The Wyrd bleeds off the Vizier in waves -- and it seems to manifest as reflective of the character's core persona. A lustful Lailokin might find that the air above his flesh is suffused with tendrils of sultry red smoke. A frenetic or angry Vizier may crackle with shasnaps and pops of lightning or static. Charity as Virtue might cause a halo of burnished light, while a cruel and callous Vizier might simply be cast in an unsettling shadow.

    Background: As a magical advisor to the king or queen, a Vizier's life is hardly his own. While certainly some rulers will make this easier than others, for the most part running a freehold and juggling all the disparate elements (elements that can be as simple as negotiating peace between two arguing Lost or as complicated as stomping out a hobgoblin insurrection that threatens to come flooding out of the Hedge) is a painful and time-consuming job. Acting as a ruler's right-hand magician and advisor means that a lot of the sovereign's burden is shared squarely upon the Vizier's shoulder.

    What goes into this mighty job, this heavy millstone around the Vizier's neck? It means offering a number of social and mental advantages -- a Vizier must be a bureaucrat, a diplomat, an investigator, a sage. The Vizier will often act as a king's representative, operating on his behalf as a proxy. Plus, when issues of magic of Wyrd come up. the Vizier is expected to be the uttermost authority. Above all else, the changeling better know the ins and outs of Faerie magic and madness... or she at least will need to learn how to fake it with extreme confidence.

    Organization: To a large extent, each Vizier is an island. While some freeholds have more than one Vizier, many only have the one -- and that Vizier is expected to service all of the Court kings and queens.

    This is perhaps the most difficult thing about a Vizier's job. She's expected to be neutral, and her job does not end when the seasons shift or a new sultana or Moon Princess ascends to her position. She remains standing in place next to the throne, and advises the coming monarch. This is tricky for a number of reasons. In some domains, the rulers come to resent the Vizier -- after all, she acted as counsel for what may have been rivals, and because the Vizier represents a stable presence it's also likely that many of the freehold changelings come to her with their problems. Alternately, some rulers are happy that this is the case; if the Vizier wants to take the burden while the king takes the glory, so be it. Still, other rulers shut the Vizier out entirely. No explicit rule states that a king or queen must accept a Vizier's advisements or even let her give the advice in the first place. Of course, once one king accepts her advice, then all the rulers will jump on board.

    How a Vizier reacts is up to her. If she wants to be the power behind the throne and try to pull the puppet strings of one or several rulers, then that's the way it'll be. If she doesn't have the foresight and instead is the puppet instead of the puppeteer, then oh well. Maybe she's honest and good. Maybe she refuses to be shut out. Maybe she's happy to be shut out. For the most part, other Viziers simply don't get involved. Frankly, a once-deranged changeling is far more useful as a worthless or manipulative Vizier than as a loose cannon with the mad magic of Faerie fate at her fingertips. Some Viziers might get involved from afar and urge a ruler to heed the freehold Vizier's advice. Some might instead try to stir the character into action or to mend her scheming ways. Otherwise? They stay out of it.

    Privilege: Vizier's Boon
    Members of the Entitlement receive the following privileges.

    Clarity of Duty
    Joining the Office of Vizieral Counsel lays down an anchor for a changeling's perspective, likened by some to pulling back from the precipice to a stable, safe place. Members may regain a dot of Clarity once per story when their advice averts disaster to the freehold. Should they directly interfere in the affairs of the Courts, however, they suffer a Clarity breaking point, but receive a +3 bonus to the roll if their actions are meant to benefit the freehold as a whole.

    Clausemaker's Boon
    Magic comes easily to the Viziers, and they are able to use their heightened connection to the Wyrd to invoke powers beyond the reach of most Lost. A member of the Entitlement has an effective dot rating in Goblin Vow equal to her Wyrd. These purviews do not count toward the actual Merit, if purchased, and the Vizier can choose to replace them with new ones through sleep or a scene of meditation. In addition to this, when learning a new Contract, she also receives a free Seeming clause.

    Rumors of the Eternal Advisors:

    • These guys are eternal, right? Their crazy moonbat founder, Lailoken? Ask around, and you might learn that he never died. He's still out there. Working for some king or another. Maybe he doesn't call himself that anymore, but he's out there, all right. And given that he's been alive for a couple thousand years, let's all just hope he walks the narrow path and keeps on keeping on for the Viziers. Or we're all going to cower beneath his madness and might.

    • Face it, they have more power than the rulers themselves. They're always there, always a presence. Oh, sure, the kings and queens don't need to take their advice, don't even need to let them in the door. But they will. Why? Well, what I heard is that they get a Polaroid or other picture in an envelope slid under their door. And on that picture is a shot of them getting killed: mid-brain splatter or axe-to-chest. Written on the photo is a note: "You should listen to your advisor." And they listen. They always listen.

    • Rumor mill tells of one of them that tried to become a queen herself. That was a bad day for that freehold. First night of Winter comes, they hand over power to her. The curtain draws back. Her title is stripped from her -- she's no longer a Vizier. She ages, super fast. Skin like parchment, hair goes white, bones crack. She doesn't die, though. And she goes nuclear. Her mind fractures into a thousand tiny pieces. She went on a tear that night. Killed a good third of the freehold. They still talk about it: The "Night of the Winter Witch," they call it.
    Last edited by Deionscribe; 10-14-2016, 03:59 AM.


    "My Homebrew Hub"
    Age of Azar
    The Kingdom of Yamatai

  • #2
    Here's my attempt at a 2E Conversion for the Viziers. Critique will be especially appreciated for this one.


    "My Homebrew Hub"
    Age of Azar
    The Kingdom of Yamatai

    Comment


    • #3
      I like it. The changes you made to it make sense given the 2e changes to the rules.

      Making immortality a requirement effectivy instead of a boon makes sense.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Omegaphallic View Post
        I like it. The changes you made to it make sense given the 2e changes to the rules.

        Making immortality a requirement effectivy instead of a boon makes sense.
        Not to mention Wyrd in 2E gives a changeling a pretty big lifespan, by default. That said, I'm glad you like it. I was having some concerns about giving the Entitlement a Clarity benefit.


        "My Homebrew Hub"
        Age of Azar
        The Kingdom of Yamatai

        Comment


        • #5
          The clarity benifits with the Entitlements pupose, which is partly to keep them anchored and sane for a lack of a better word.

          Comment


          • #6
            The Clarity Benefit fits the fluff on the Entitlement, but it's also way more powerful than the Seeming Blessings. I'd change it so that Clarity of Duty applies only once per Story, like the Seeming Blessings, and that it also comes with a Curse- they suffer a Breaking Point whenever they interfere in the actions of the Courts, even to the benefit of the Freehold. I'm sort of picturing a combination of Merlin (for whom Lailoken was the historical basis) and Varys from Game of Thrones.

            Also, shouldn't these guys get an Approach? I'm reasonably certain that the revealed Entitlements come with Personal Approaches.


            My Homebrew Hub

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Arcanist View Post
              The Clarity Benefit fits the fluff on the Entitlement, but it's also way more powerful than the Seeming Blessings. I'd change it so that Clarity of Duty applies only once per Story, like the Seeming Blessings, and that it also comes with a Curse- they suffer a Breaking Point whenever they interfere in the actions of the Courts, even to the benefit of the Freehold. I'm sort of picturing a combination of Merlin (for whom Lailoken was the historical basis) and Varys from Game of Thrones.

              Also, shouldn't these guys get an Approach? I'm reasonably certain that the revealed Entitlements come with Personal Approaches.
              They have an Approach in their write-up. And it is written as being once per chapter, like with the Seeming blessings. I'm not sure, though, whether I should add in the Curse to balance it out, since the breaking point is perhaps implied by how the Approach was phrased.


              "My Homebrew Hub"
              Age of Azar
              The Kingdom of Yamatai

              Comment


              • #8
                Ah, so it is. Missed it there. Hmm... need to go back and reread the updated Seemings, I could have sworn the Seeming Blessing came into effect less frequently than once a Chapter.


                My Homebrew Hub

                Comment

                Working...
                X