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  • Dark Era Geist

    I'm really liking the look of the new Dark Eras book. While God's Own Country doesn't immediately resonate with me (I don't understand the inherent "Geist-ness" in the same way I do for other periods and settings), I'm looking forward to learning more.

    It's also inspired me to try my hand at this period lark, and I humbly suggest using the following for your own game.

    "The Hungry Eye"

    Essentially, this is Geist set during the Irish Potato Famine of 1845-1852.

    I'll post more here when I have time, but the highlights are huge amounts of death, workhouses, coffin ships, desperation, and potentially strange, starved figures picking their way across the country, neither alive nor dead.

    Thoughts?

  • #2
    Well I'm interested


    “There are no rules. Only Principles and natural laws.” - Promethius
    My Homebrew no longer fits in a signature, you can find an index of it here.
    Full length fan-books I contributed too: Princess: the Hopeful, Leviathan: the Tempest, Dream Catchers

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    • #3
      The title comes from an old Irish saying:

      Feiceann an tsúil ocras i bhfad

      Roughly translated "The Hungry Eye sees far"

      More to come. Suggestions/questions very welcome.

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      • #4
        I'll probably have something after you've posted more.


        “There are no rules. Only Principles and natural laws.” - Promethius
        My Homebrew no longer fits in a signature, you can find an index of it here.
        Full length fan-books I contributed too: Princess: the Hopeful, Leviathan: the Tempest, Dream Catchers

        Comment


        • #5
          I'd play it! Damn, Irish folklore, mythology and Christian iconography would be excellent for Geist!

          Also: I totally know that old saying, too!
          Last edited by NateD; 02-04-2015, 08:15 PM.


          Freelance OPP. Dark Eras, Shattered Dreams, and counting!

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          • #6
            Right so.

            First up: some funeral traditions.
            I've recently been in the unfortunate situation where I've attended a number of family funerals, however one thing I did to semi-distract myself was note some of the (seemingly insane) funeral traditions. These are by no means exhaustive, but my own Family (and others in the area) observes the following:

            - After the death, the burial happens as soon as possible
            - The body is laid out in the deceased's home until the burial
            - While the body is being waked, a vigil must be observed. At least one person must stay with the body at all times. At least one person must be awake at all times.
            - All mirrors in the room with the body must be covered, turned to face the wall or removed. Any clocks must be removed.
            - The deceased must have rosary beads wrapped around their hands at least, occasionally their feet is also done.
            - If there had been a recent death in the household (aapart from the current one), then sometimes a small table is set up with a photo of the recently deceased, a candle, and usually somethingredients like a glass of whiskey or something of equivalent relevance - essentially a sort of Irish ofrendes
            - Before the coffin is closed and locked shut, the deceased is anointed and buried with a number of personal items and photos of loved ones
            - When shouldering the coffin, it cannot be shouldered anti-clockwise through the graveyard. This sometimes results in very long processions, but apparently you must walk clockwise.

            Feel free to suggest any further rites, etc.

            Anyhow. In The Hungry Eye, this need for rites and traditions is a problem. Due to the nature of the period, some or all of these cannot always be observed. This results in something crawling back into the body after the person has left.

            The result is The Famished (I'll also accept The Ravenous, The Empty, The Hollow, or any other suggestions); Painfully thin, ragged, corpse-like figures with hollow eyes, bloated stomachs and perhaps green stains around their mouths. The stumble across the land, endlessly hungry. For what though?

            Comment


            • #7
              *Shudder* Awesome!

              Are they traditional Irish funeral traditions? Interestingly, my family are (Protestant) Irish Australians, and haven't done any of that (apart from perhaps the funeral procession - i just went where I was told to go.)

              Not sure what a good hunger is (apart from offrendes), but I have a really disturbing mental image of a revenant/zombie-like Famished kneeling awkwardly, trying to chew on a pile of rocks or concrete. Teeth shattered, jaw progressively more and more mangled, but still just kneeling there, trying to fill their empty belly.

              (Aaaaaaand now I won't be sleeping tonight. Thanks! )


              Freelance OPP. Dark Eras, Shattered Dreams, and counting!

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              • #8
                They are real traditions in the sense that my (Catholic) Family observe them. Most I have seen other families do too.

                Aside: I'm not religious, but I do enjoy the blatantly pagan traditions that Catholicism has absorbed or have latched on.

                In terms of hunger, I reckon that that's likely a good starting point. They're hungry for anything. They walk and walk and walk and eventually they stop due to broken and bloody feet or for some other reason. And they eat.
                Stories of bloated bellies splitting open from skeletal figures drinking from rivers till they drown, or jaws being mangled from eating rocks, or wood. Other, darker stories tell of children that were carried away. Though nobody listens. Children are carried away to the workhouse all the time, they're probably just confused.

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                • #9
                  Another issue for Sin Eaters to deal with are the graves. Huge, unmarked mass graves are dotted across the land, filled with those who died from starvation, exhaustion, disease or a mixture of all three. These graves are locuses for ghosts - hordes of confused and angry dead linger on, unsure of what to do. What can the Sin Eaters do about this though?

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                  • #10
                    Three other images or ideas here:

                    1. The Workhouse. A hellish sentence, rarely willingly volunteered for. Sample problem: the ghost of a woman who was denied access to her child and died from exhaustion haunts the building, causing accidents, killing off other children etc.

                    2. Coffin Ships. It's well known how much of a risk passage on one of these to the colonies is, but what choice do we have. That said, there are rumors of strange figures skulking on board after dark, before the ship leaves port...

                    3. Travellers. Those tinkers that have set up shop outside of the village seem strange. One of them seems to be able to cook a full dinner from anything. Another hurts people to look at her, and that hairy one is big as a giant. The seanachaí is full of stories of little people and forts, but he has better things to be doing than talking rubbish in times like this.

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                    • #11
                      My pitch for a Geist Dark Era is one set in the Antebellum United States focusing on the Underground Railroad, actually incorporating in the literal Autochthonous Depths and slave folklore.

                      Which ironically enough would set it exactly contemporaneously to baileyborough's pitch!


                      Check out my expansion to the Realm of Brass and Shadow

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                      • #12
                        I suggested geist during the Boxer Rebellion, since the boxers claimed they had techniques to attract spirit possession, including ghosts (especially historical figures).

                        That sounds like a perfect story hook for sin-eaters to me.

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                        • #13
                          Or an overworked Uratha campaign.


                          Check out my expansion to the Realm of Brass and Shadow

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                          • #14
                            Yes, it could definitely work as a crossover setting.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by baileyborough View Post
                              Right so.

                              First up: some funeral traditions.
                              I've recently been in the unfortunate situation where I've attended a number of family funerals, however one thing I did to semi-distract myself was note some of the (seemingly insane) funeral traditions. These are by no means exhaustive, but my own Family (and others in the area) observes the following:

                              - After the death, the burial happens as soon as possible
                              - The body is laid out in the deceased's home until the burial
                              - While the body is being waked, a vigil must be observed. At least one person must stay with the body at all times. At least one person must be awake at all times.
                              - All mirrors in the room with the body must be covered, turned to face the wall or removed. Any clocks must be removed.
                              - The deceased must have rosary beads wrapped around their hands at least, occasionally their feet is also done.
                              - If there had been a recent death in the household (aapart from the current one), then sometimes a small table is set up with a photo of the recently deceased, a candle, and usually somethingredients like a glass of whiskey or something of equivalent relevance - essentially a sort of Irish ofrendes
                              - Before the coffin is closed and locked shut, the deceased is anointed and buried with a number of personal items and photos of loved ones
                              - When shouldering the coffin, it cannot be shouldered anti-clockwise through the graveyard. This sometimes results in very long processions, but apparently you must walk clockwise.

                              Feel free to suggest any further rites, etc.

                              Anyhow. In The Hungry Eye, this need for rites and traditions is a problem. Due to the nature of the period, some or all of these cannot always be observed. This results in something crawling back into the body after the person has left.

                              The result is The Famished (I'll also accept The Ravenous, The Empty, The Hollow, or any other suggestions); Painfully thin, ragged, corpse-like figures with hollow eyes, bloated stomachs and perhaps green stains around their mouths. The stumble across the land, endlessly hungry. For what though?
                              As Protestant Irish I can confirm we do almost all of these too, except for the Rosary Beads. Also in my experience the funeral is always 3 days after the death.

                              Another one that I've been party to too many times is that the coffin is carried from the persons house to the edge of the local townland and only at that point is it placed on the hearse.
                              It's also worth noting that an Irish wake usually consists of lots of drinking (tea in the daytime, spirits in the evening) and telling stories about the deceased. If the person was old, it is rarely a sombre event.

                              I also wanted to add that this would be an awesome setting, although potentially a little too dark for many. It would be a true horror game, but I'd be interested in hearing more.

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