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[2E] Durability of Materials

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  • [2E] Durability of Materials

    Hello ,
    me and my friends are currently running Mage 2e and with the new addition which is SoS we have some questions... But for now one:
    What are the durabilities of normal materials?
    And by normal materials i mean:
    Gold
    Silver
    Mercury
    Copper
    Tin
    Lead
    and of course Steel/Iron which i think is 3 but dont quote me on that
    also it would be nice to know durabilities of things like Gems Glass Leather ?

  • #2
    Steel and iron are indeed durability 3 (page 223 of M:tAw2).

    Glass is going to be durability zero or maybe 1 unless it's reinforced in some way.

    Mercury is liquid at anything above -38 degrees C, and thus would have a durability of zero.

    For other materials I'd just extrapolate from the Mohs scale of mineral hardness. Since iron and steel are a Mohs hardness of 4 and a Durability of 3, it's probably safe to say Durability = Mohs hardness minus one.

    So gold and silver would both be durability one, tin would be zero, and copper would be two.


    Mentats - a 2e Free Council Obrimos Legacy (Mind/Forces) built around being a human computer; Thaumatech Engineers - a 2e Free Council Obrimos Legacy (Matter/Prime) focusing on the creation of Imbued items and the enhancement of Sleeper technology

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    • #3
      The table from VtR 2e:
      1: Wood, hard plastic, thick glass
      2: Stone, aluminum
      3: Steel, iron
      +1: per reinforced layer

      Originally posted by proindrakenzol View Post
      For other materials I'd just extrapolate from the Mohs scale of mineral hardness. Since iron and steel are a Mohs hardness of 4 and a Durability of 3, it's probably safe to say Durability = Mohs hardness minus one.
      Hardness is a very specific type of material resistance. Hard objects can still be very brittle, which would bring down their Durability. For example, porcelain has a hardness of 7 on Moh's scale, which would translate to Durability 6 with your method, and that's way too high for such a brittle material. Regular glass lands around 6 so Durability 5, which is also way too high.

      Originally posted by proindrakenzol View Post
      So gold and silver would both be durability one, tin would be zero, and copper would be two.
      I would increase all of those by one. Durability 0 is for things that has little to no resistance at all.


      When formed into objects, I'd also increase or decrease Durability based on how durable the shape is. A sphere tends to be highly resistant due to lack of weak points, curvature and compactness, while thin sheets tend to bend or shatter at almost no pressure unless reinforced somehow.


      Bloodline: The Stygians
      Ordo Dracul Mysteries: Mystery of Smoke, Revised Mystery of Živa
      Mage The Awakening: Spell Quick Reference (single page and landscape for computer screens)

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Tessie View Post
        The table from VtR 2e:
        1: Wood, hard plastic, thick glass
        2: Stone, aluminum
        3: Steel, iron
        +1: per reinforced layer



        Hardness is a very specific type of material resistance. Hard objects can still be very brittle, which would bring down their Durability. For example, porcelain has a hardness of 7 on Moh's scale, which would translate to Durability 6 with your method, and that's way too high for such a brittle material. Regular glass lands around 6 so Durability 5, which is also way too high.
        That's fair. Maybe divide by two or three for especially brittle material?



        I would increase all of those by one. Durability 0 is for things that has little to no resistance at all.
        I'd argue that tin has little to no resistance, a durability of .5: effectively one for mundane purposes and effectively zero for withstand.

        Copper should not be as durable as steel, and gold and silver shouldn't be as durable as copper.

        When formed into objects, I'd also increase or decrease Durability based on how durable the shape is. A sphere tends to be highly resistant due to lack of weak points, curvature and compactness, while thin sheets tend to bend or shatter at almost no pressure unless reinforced somehow.
        I like this idea.


        Mentats - a 2e Free Council Obrimos Legacy (Mind/Forces) built around being a human computer; Thaumatech Engineers - a 2e Free Council Obrimos Legacy (Matter/Prime) focusing on the creation of Imbued items and the enhancement of Sleeper technology

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