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  • Originally posted by BlueWinds View Post
    The Soul in Motion (•••, Supernatural)
    Prerequisites: Dexterity 3, Wits 3, Space 3
    Effect: Most beings are, on some level, static - stable enough that with the proper Imago, one can target them regardless of physical motion. The Mage breaks that rule. Her essence is motion. Her nature is flux. Any Sensory Range spell that would affect her rolls to hit as though it were Aimed (but with a +5 bonus) as the Imago slips off of her.
    Drawback: She cannot choose to lower this effect, and she cannot choose not to apply her Defense when targeted by spells (though if she's unconscious or otherwise immobile, she may not be able to do so).
    Problem: Supernatural Merits are restricted to humans (no major templates), while this mentions Mages and requires Space, which restricts it to Mages. It is literally impossible to take according to the rules. Dropping the Supernatural tag would be enough.


    Malkydel: "And the Machine dictated; let there be adequate illumination."
    Yossarian: "And lo, it was optimal."

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    • Originally posted by Moinen View Post
      Edit:
      Four Rules (• to •••••, Style)
      Prerequisites: Resolve 3, Gnosis 3
      Effect:You prefer releasing Paradox instead of containing. And you are good at it.
      Drawback: ???

      Anchor (•) - Substract dots in this merit from Paradox penalty to spells dice pool if released.
      Anchor
      v2 (•) - Halve Paradox penalty to spells dice pool if released. Round down.

      xxxxxx (••) -

      xxxxxx (•••) -

      Hammer (••••) - After ST rolled for Paradox you can spend Mana to cancel his successes with one-to-one ratio. You have do it in one turn and you are still limited by Gnosis and dots in this merit.
      Is it okay for me to bring this back up? The concept really got me excited, but then it dropped from the conversation. Hopefully Moinen will weigh the worthiness of my offering.

      I did like the offered drawback of more lasting Paradoxes from HerbertIsBestBert. But maybe it should be a more personal drawback, like penalizing the check for Wisdom loss? Perhaps the style imposes a penalty of half your merit dots (round up) when releasing Paradox into your spells? If so it could drive the mage to using their inured spells to circumvent the drawback, consequently drawing down more Paradox. On the other hand, it could simply be viewed as a borderline Left-Handed practice, weaponizing releasing Paradox into the world. The Guardians of the Veil at the very least would take a dim view of those practicing this style. Even if using the style doesn't in itself justify hunting you down, increased scrutiny isn't very good for anyone in the Chronicles of Darkness.

      As for the other two benefits, maybe something like these? Names are just my attempt at connecting the concept of the anchor to the hammer.

      Fulcrum (••) - Whether due to meditating on the powers of your Path, studying the Paradoxes others have released upon the world, or just simple practice, you have become somewhat inured to the effects of your released Paradoxes. You gain a bonus equal to your dots in the style for resisting the effects of any Paradox Tilts you cause.

      (a) Leverage (•••) - You've improved your ability to gauge just how much paradox you incur in your spells. You can have the Storyteller re-roll the Paradox die pool once when you cast a spell. Use the result of the re-roll, even if more successes are rolled.

      (b) Leverage (•••) - You've worked hard at your spellcasting, and have become used to releasing Paradox into them. You gain a +1 bonus to your roll when you check for Wisdom loss whenever you cast a spell and release the Paradox.

      Notes: The style does feel like it's compensating for the harm you're incurring by releasing Paradox, capping with suppressing the Paradox with Supernal might. I hope Fulcrum is in keeping with this, as protection from your own Paradox over and above not suffering it yourself, while not generalizing the protection to all Paradox Tilts. Leverage depends on whether that protection extends to your Wisdom, or if you've internalized the fact that you are committing acts of hubris. If it does, I thought generalizing the protection might be a good idea, so those unable to transgress their Wisdom just from releasing Paradox don't feel left out. If it doesn't, letting the player weigh the odds on the Paradox roll might help with the capstone ability. If it feels too strong, perhaps limiting it to the character's Praxis? Or maybe something else, if this treads too far into Scelesti territory?
      Last edited by KageMCS; 10-07-2018, 05:05 PM. Reason: Finally realized I didn't link the quote correctly. Or credit @HerbertIsBestBert. *facepalm* Hopefully I've fixed everything now.

      Comment


      • Originally posted by KageMCS View Post
        Or maybe something else, if this treads too far into Scelesti territory?
        Oh, it surely does that. Not that this is a bad thing, design-wise.

        I like the tone, here, which is non-judgmental. I'd consider making this a softer form of going Scelestus---Something that a character could rationalize or even like.

        Hmm: Perhaps add a Withstand rating vs. Paradox so the character is harder to affect directly with Paradox. It's not that Paradoxes are reduced, it's just that the merit means they aren't directly affecting the character. If you add the dice and Withstand at the same rate there will be more and bigger Paradoxes but the character will trend waltz through. They'll do more damage to everyone else and interfere with their own spells and such much less.

        Drawback, in that case, would seem to fit the theme. (Might just do a +1 to Paradox upgraded to +2 starting at 4, or something)

        Loss of a level of free Reach could be something to play with.



        Last edited by thenate; 10-06-2018, 08:58 PM.


        Grump, grouse, and/or gripe.

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        • Originally posted by thenate View Post
          I like the tone, here, which is non-judgmental. I'd consider making this a softer form of going Scelestus---Something that a character could rationalize or even like.
          Well, I can't take all the credit for that. Not originally my idea and all. Hopefully Moinen doesn't mind us playing around with his toy too much.

          Yeah, I like that "softer form of going Scelestus." I think it's what originally drew me. I'll adopt that as my platform.

          SCELESTUS-LITE, NOW WITH 0% BEFOULING, 100% "F*CK CONSEQUENCES."

          I'm thinking the style falls in a very grey area, not interacting with the mechanics for Befouling your spells. Not directly anyways. I'd imagine there being some old masters of Four Rules who have never Befouled any of their spells and self-righteously hunting down those students they catch straying. A "real" Scelestus, meanwhile, might not view practitioners of this style as necessarily part of their ziggurat like the Rabashakim (cupbearers) are, instead viewing them as "pilgrims" passing by the ziggurat that might be called over to worship. (Had to go back and refresh my memory on the terminology. Reminded me why I like these guys and what absolute pieces of work they can be.)

          Originally posted by thenate View Post
          Hmm: Perhaps add a Withstand rating vs. Paradox so the character is harder to affect directly with Paradox. It's not that Paradoxes are reduced, it's just that the merit means they aren't directly affecting the character. If you add the dice and Withstand at the same rate there will be more and bigger Paradoxes but the character will trend waltz through. They'll do more damage to everyone else and interfere with their own spells and such much less.
          Why you sly devil. I was just looking back and wondering how to protect the character from the Paradox Reach in their own spells. It's genius, and fits so well! I'd probably restrict that Withstand to your own Paradoxes though, just to keep the power from creeping up too much. If there's any organization to style practitioners, maybe they have friendly fire protection set into the style, but no more than that. So would adding the Withstand rating (equal to Potency, maybe?) be optional with an additional Paradox risk?

          Originally posted by thenate View Post
          Drawback, in that case, would seem to fit the theme. (Might just do a +1 to Paradox upgraded to +2 starting at 4, or something)

          Loss of a level of free Reach could be something to play with.
          I really like making more Paradox being the drawback. The whole style kind of revolves around taking the thought and care that's supposed to go into all spellcasting, and tossing it out the window. While making everyone else deal with the consequences. Wow, anyone who takes this style is kind of a dick. I love it. And if we're going full Scelestus-lite here, I should probably withdraw my idea of the style interacting with Wisdom at all. Scelestus are all about nihilism, and nihilism is a complete disconnection from any and all moral structures. And I kind of dig baking the philosophical underpinnings into the mechanics. Plus we don't know what the Joining as an Integrity analog is going to look like, so I probably should've thought about that angle a little more. So I second thenate, the main Drawback to the Four Rules (aside from being Scelesti-lite, and all THAT entails) is greater Paradox risk, reflected either as losing one free Reach, or always having a +1 to Paradox dice pools, whichever more elegantly fits with the main rules.

          Right now, Four Rules style looks like this with my and @thenate's ideas in brackets. Any version one benefits are Moinen's original formulation. Added fluff in brackets because while I like fluff, I don't know what Moinen will feel about it.

          Four Rules (• to ••••, Style)
          Prerequisites: Resolve 3, Gnosis 3
          Effect: You prefer releasing Paradox instead of containing. And you are good at it.
          Drawback: [You suffer greater Paradox risk. You lose one free Reach on all spells.]

          Anchor v1 (•) - [The first step in this style is improving your chances at successfully casting your spells. You no longer suffer penalties to your spellcasting roll below a certain threshold.] Substract dots in this merit from Paradox penalty to spells dice pool if released.
          Anchor v2 (•) - [The first step in this style is improving your chances at successfully casting your spells. You no longer suffer as great a penalty to your spellcasting roll.] Halve Paradox penalty to spells dice pool if released. Round down.


          [Fulcrum (••) - Whether due to meditating on the powers of your Path, studying the Paradoxes others have released upon the world, or just simple practice, you have become somewhat inured to the effects of your released Paradoxes. You gain a bonus equal to your dots in the style for resisting the effects of any Paradox Tilts you cause.]

          [Leverage (•••) - Further development of Fulcrum has extended your protection against Paradox Tilts to the Paradox in your own spells. You gain a Withstand rating equal to your spell's Potency effective against Paradox Reach.]

          Hammer v1 (••••) - [You've achieved all Four Rules. You can now suppress Paradox Reach with Supernal power outright instead of managing chances.] After ST rolled for Paradox you can spend Mana to cancel his successes with one-to-one ratio. You have do it in one turn and you are still limited by Gnosis and dots in this merit.
          [Hammer
          v2 (••••) - You've achieved all Four Rules. Through long practice, you can now better weigh the risk of Paradox in your spells. You can have the ST re-roll the Paradox dice pool once when you cast. Take the result of the re-roll, even if more successes are rolled.]

          I'm offering my Hammer version as an option if the Scelestus-lite feel is embraced, since suppressing Paradox with Mana doesn't feel like it fits with that theme. Plus it opens up the option of "real" Scelesti using it to increase Paradox.
          Last edited by KageMCS; 10-08-2018, 11:00 PM.

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          • One of the dev blogs used to describe using Blood Sacrifices as a Sacrament to gain a Yantra Bonus equal to Mana gain, in lieu of Mana itself. It looks like that got cut from the book, but I thought it was pretty awesome, so I built a merit around the idea.

            Blood Magic (Style, • to •••)
            Prerequisites: Awakened, Resolve •••, Composure •••
            Effect: You are particularly adept at the twisted art of fueling your magic with living sacraments.

            Blood-Stained Implements (•) -- You've learned how to preserve the lingering energies from a blood sacrifice, and by ritually coating a single magical tool in blood while performing a blood sacrifice, you may spend gained Mana to grant that tool an additional +1 Yantra bonus and expand it's semiotic associations appropriately for a single use per point of Mana spent.

            Bound in Blood (••) -- Blood can serve as a powerful conduit for magical energies, and you've learned how to use it to leach the most harmful of them away. You treat blood sacrifice Sacraments as if they were a Dedicated Tool, and reduce Paradox accordingly. Alternatively, you may use Blood-Stained Implements to annoint a specific tool with blood and use it as a Dedicated Tool (replacing the +1 Yantra bonus), though this effect only persists for half as many uses as it otherwise would (round down, minimum 1).

            Well of Sacrifice (•••) -- When performing a Blood Sacrifice as a Sacrament, you may opt not to gain any Mana from the sacrifice, and instead replace the normal sacrament Yantra bonus with a bonus equal to the amount of Mana you would have gained. You may still utilize Blood-Stained Implements, reducing the sacrament Yantra bonus by one for each use, as though you were spending gained Mana on the effect.

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            • I cannot recommend "Doing First Tongue Translations" thread enough. Among the First Tongue translations are some specifically Scelesti translations. So I made a request for a translation last thing before bed, and in the morning I found this waiting for me.

              Originally posted by Adrasalieth View Post
              KageMCS

              ​Id' propose either one (or both) of these:

              A) Thirik-Harmathakhdul ("Extensive Traveller of the Fallen World")

              It mimics the distinction made by Werewolves and spirits between the title of Gurihathakhdul ("one that has extensively travelled the Gurihal, the physical world of the Flesh") and this of Hisithakhdul ("one that has extensively travelled the Shadow"), but emphasizes on the world as it is Fallen (thirik: to fall, to collapse, to disintegrate; Thirik-Harmatha: the Fallen World).

              The reason for this emphasis in the case of an almost-but-not-quite-Scelesti is evident, though its exact implications are not that clear. Perhaps it cynically implies that Pilgrims are the only non-Scelesti mages that have seen enough of the Fallen World to understand how irremediably sundered from the Supernal it was, which makes them lucid enough to deal with the reality of the Fall rather than keep up vain and delusional pretenses of avoiding anything Abyssal. Unless it simply underlines that this reality Falls even lower everywhere a Pilgrim treads.

              B) Yageken-Thun ("Travellers of the Void").

              (same construction as Illusah-Thun, "the Travellers of Watery Trails", aka Riverkin)

              While "Yageken" (hole, void) is simply the First Tongue term for the Abyss,"thun" can either indicate the notion of travel ("to move, to travel; to place elsewhere") or the idea of digging, rocking, or churning around. So Yageken-Thun could also be understood as "Those who Displace the Void" or "Hole Diggers".
              I was all set to run with it, then I got a notification and found this.

              Originally posted by Adrasalieth View Post
              KageMCS

              Upon reflection…

              The ranks in the Scelesti hierarchy are not in First Tongue, but in various, more tardive Semitic languages: Rabashakim derives from Rabashak, the name or term used to designate the envoy of an Assyrian king in the Book of Nahum, while Aswadim comes from the Arabian word aswad (“black”). I think it’d be more fitting (and cooler) to maintain that stylistical continuity. (Also, it might be handy to have a word that is less of a mouthful than Thirik-Harmathakhdul...)

              Hence, while the First Tongue terms I give you may still be accurate to describe the Pilgrims (or even any kind of Befouler) from the standpoint of an Uremehir speaker, I’ve decided to submit to you a couple of terms in broken Akkadian.

              When speaking about Four Rules Pilgrims showing no interest in furthering their dealings with the Abyss, Scelesti refer to them as Nakrim or Nakarim (“foreigners, strangers, enemies”). The mere fact that an Awakened unbefouled could behold and make use of its dreadful wonders and get away with it, without paying the due toll in chaotic change and beautiful tragedy, is blasphemy without measure to them.

              Oppositedly, those who seem to embrace the tenets of the Scelesti and use their gifts to further their agenda receive the (slightly) less appellation of Ubārim (“visitors, guests; immigrants”). While it also indicates a level of foreignness, it also denotates some measure of acceptance. For her eagerness and deviousness, the Pilgrim is tolerated: the Abyss is not yet her home, but it may be, one day.

              Lastly. those with full understanding of the Four Rules probably earn themselves the title of Shanamzaqim (from the Akkadian ša namzaqi, "a doorkeeper, person in charge of keys"). Whether they gladly enter the building they spent so long to map and charter, finally merging with their Ziggurat, or simply swing open its gates without risking themselves in, Shanamzaqim are enablers to the Abyss, showering the world in its twisted blessings, and Scelesti respect that, however begrudgingly.

              Of course, the name of “Doormen” to qualify non-Scelesti unleashers and subduers of Abyssal Manifestations is not without reminding a certain Exarch of the Gate… (whistle gleefully in Parametric Language).
              And now Adrasalieth is my personal hero, for putting all that additional time and energy into my little request, and for dropping in a connection to the Gate. Please forward all likes to the original posts.
              Last edited by KageMCS; 10-09-2018, 03:21 PM.

              Comment


              • Originally posted by lnodiv View Post
                One of the dev blogs used to describe using Blood Sacrifices as a Sacrament to gain a Yantra Bonus equal to Mana gain, in lieu of Mana itself. It looks like that got cut from the book, but I thought it was pretty awesome, so I built a merit around the idea.

                Blood Magic (Style, • to •••)
                Prerequisites: Awakened, Resolve •••, Composure •••
                Effect: You are particularly adept at the twisted art of fueling your magic with living sacraments.

                Blood-Stained Implements (•) -- You've learned how to preserve the lingering energies from a blood sacrifice, and by ritually coating a single magical tool in blood while performing a blood sacrifice, you may spend gained Mana to grant that tool an additional +1 Yantra bonus and expand it's semiotic associations appropriately for a single use per point of Mana spent.

                Bound in Blood (••) -- Blood can serve as a powerful conduit for magical energies, and you've learned how to use it to leach the most harmful of them away. You treat blood sacrifice Sacraments as if they were a Dedicated Tool, and reduce Paradox accordingly. Alternatively, you may use Blood-Stained Implements to annoint a specific tool with blood and use it as a Dedicated Tool (replacing the +1 Yantra bonus), though this effect only persists for half as many uses as it otherwise would (round down, minimum 1).

                Well of Sacrifice (•••) -- When performing a Blood Sacrifice as a Sacrament, you may opt not to gain any Mana from the sacrifice, and instead replace the normal sacrament Yantra bonus with a bonus equal to the amount of Mana you would have gained. You may still utilize Blood-Stained Implements, reducing the sacrament Yantra bonus by one for each use, as though you were spending gained Mana on the effect.
                Double post, but this is definitely worth promoting. A complete style (Inodiv sure is better put-together than I am), and one about living sacrifices. Isn't it just a bit twisted blood sacrifices are part of the innate template and not just an add-on? I like how you start out improving tools, leading up to using the sacrifice for a truly powerful Yantra itself. Oh, you can get a potent Yantra relatively easily, but what will it cost you? Really brings up images of Aztec and Mayan sacrificial rites in my mind, especially the first two dots. I realize "magical tool" could be anything, but "knife" immediately sprung to mind for me.

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                • I had this idea some time ago, but then completely forgot to post it:

                  Fortune Fracking (•••)
                  Prerequisite: Fate •••

                  All mages possess the ability to scour their physical forms for Mana, but some learn ways of converting more esoteric aspects of their Pattern into mystical power. With this Merit, a mage can voluntarily accept a Hex with a Potency up to their dots in Fate; in return, the mage gains a number of points of Mana equal to the Hex's Potency. The Storyteller designs the Hex, and, like resistant damage, it cannot be mitigated or dispelled by supernatural means. Use of this Merit counts toward the number of times per day a mage may scour their own Pattern.

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                  • I came up with this Merit a while ago, but it might be of use for somebody!
                    Magical Focus(•• to ••••)

                    Prerequisites Awakened, Arcanum at 3 or more. Effect: Once a Mage has studied an Arcanum deep enough to understand its basics principles, he can begin to specialize in a given field within the Arcanum. When you buy this merit, you must choose one purview within the Arcanum chosen. A few examples are: Death (shadows), Fate (boons), Matter (solids) and so on. When casting spells within the chosen purview, the mage can use this merit as persona Yantra with a bonus equal to the points in this merit minus 1. Also, once per game session, and before rolling the spellcasting roll, you can choose to have an exceptional success on 3 successes. You can purchase this merit only once for a given Arcanum, but you can purchase it for a number of different Arcana equal to your Gnosis.
                    Last edited by Eleizel; 11-30-2018, 07:04 AM. Reason: Fixes the type of yantra and clarified how it works

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                    • Perhaps just +2 for the 4 dot version?


                      A god is just a monster you kneel to. - ArcaneArts, Quoting "Fall of Gods"

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Eleizel View Post
                        I came up with this Merit a while ago, but it might be of use for somebody!
                        Magical Focus(•• to ••••)

                        Prerequisites Awakened, Arcanum at 3 or more. Effect: Once a Mage has studied an Arcanum deep enough to understand its basics principles, he can begin to specialize in a given field within the Arcanum. When you buy this merit, you must choose one purview within the Arcanum chosen. A few examples are: Death (shadows), Fate (boons), Matter (solids) and so on. When casting spells within the chosen purview, the casting roll gains a +1 to +3 bonus dice and counts as a Yantra. Also, once per game session, and before rolling the spellcasting roll, you can choose to have an exceptional success on 3 successes. You can purchase this merit only once for a given Arcanum, but you can purchase it for a number of different Arcana equal to your Gnosis.
                        Neat idea. I’d clarify that the bonus is 1 per dot purchased after the initial 2 for purchase that grants +1. I’d also specify what kind of Yantra the bonus is, or require that the player determine what kind of Yantra it will be. Like perhaps the one with Matter (Solids) decides that it will be an Environment Yantra tied to workshops and places where machinery are used/made.

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                        • Thanks for the reply! Actually, yes, it would give +1 with the 2 merit version, +2 with the 3 merit version, and +3 with the 4 one. As a yantra I think it should work like the shadow name works, as a persona yantra resonating with the focus and the studies you haver undergone for the chosen purview.

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                          • Originally posted by Master Aquatosic View Post
                            Perhaps just +2 for the 4 dot version?
                            I have modified how the merit gives its bonus but it should work as this: +1 with the 2 merit version, +2 with the 3 merit version, and +3 with the 4 one

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                            • Originally posted by Eleizel View Post
                              I have modified how the merit gives its bonus but it should work as this: +1 with the 2 merit version, +2 with the 3 merit version, and +3 with the 4 one
                              I saw, but i still think that +3 bonuses are too powerful even for 4 dot merits, just personally. Even if it is limited in scope somewhat.
                              Last edited by Master Aquatosic; 11-30-2018, 01:08 PM.


                              A god is just a monster you kneel to. - ArcaneArts, Quoting "Fall of Gods"

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by Master Aquatosic View Post

                                I saw, but i still think that +3 bonuses are too powerful even for 4 dot merits, just personally. Even if it is limited in scope somewhat.
                                It just depends on the power level you want in your game. For me it has been working fine, while on combat, the player almost always just add one yantra anyways, and while ritually casting, one more dice has never be too unbalanced, so if for you works better to limit the merit to +2, then just go for it!

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