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How would a Japanese Arisen adapt the story of Irem?

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  • ArcaneArts
    replied
    Which time period were you looking at?

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  • Leliel
    replied
    Originally posted by Michael View Post

    Do you mean a flaw in writing or a flaw in character? I mean, nothing says the Arisen have to be good at their jobs. There is something kinda interesting about an Arisen making their cult less viable by trying to blend in.

    Also, whilst religiosity may not be that important to most people in Japan, most people don't join cults. Japan does clearly have at least some audience for fringe religious groups.
    That, and I was thinking this particular mummy came over at an earlier time, when faith was still fairly major. They haven't quite adapted their cult from "variant of the faith" to "self-help guide for social harmony", because a true faith can snatch up people who are desperate for meaning - and because yes, this Arisen is stubborn and doesn't like changing what worked before. They're a specialist in Tribal styles of belief.

    Still, Arcane brings up a good point. That was my initial plan, but I can see now that the cult should be ethical guidelines for its members first, community second, myth third. It was my intent that their take on Japanese myth has more emphasis on what the Arisen values in the cult (especially the notion that vows are eternal, and even a brief break from them is bad - also the patrons feel bad for Izanami and felt the need to write a fix fic), but here I can see them intentionally writing the cult's myths in a way to proscribe certain behaviors that lead to greater success in the home and workplace, and being fairly open about these stories having a moral that transmits these teachings.

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  • Michael
    replied
    Originally posted by ArcaneArts View Post
    The big flaw in this is assuming that an Arisen's main venue of success for converting in modern day Japan is going to rely selling a version of Shinto rather than playing into just the national values. Religion isn't huge mover in Japan, but cultural unity is.
    Do you mean a flaw in writing or a flaw in character? I mean, nothing says the Arisen have to be good at their jobs. There is something kinda interesting about an Arisen making their cult less viable by trying to blend in.

    Also, whilst religiosity may not be that important to most people in Japan, most people don't join cults. Japan does clearly have at least some audience for fringe religious groups.

    Leave a comment:


  • ArcaneArts
    replied
    The big flaw in this is assuming that an Arisen's main venue of success for converting in modern day Japan is going to rely selling a version of Shinto rather than playing into just the national values. Religion isn't huge mover in Japan, but cultural unity is. A related subject is that the order of importance goes simple modern values, then Buddhism, and then Shinto, but really the Guild mentalities that dive more into the social order and away from the religion, such as the Maa-Kep and the Sesha-Hebsu (and the Tef-Aahbi, to a certain extent), are going to thrive more soundly. While going back in history makes that more fluid, as a broad, dumb look at history, that order continues.

    Second is that, while the Arisen don't shy away from selling along the lines of major recurring icons and themes rather than specific figures (Jesus is as good an Azar as any in most circumstances up to a certain point), they aren't going to deprioritize the major elements-if Re is a joke in Irem, then Re is a joke no matter how important Amaterasu is to the folks around them. The Arisen might keep their punchlines subtle as it goes, but they are going to play up Izanami as Ammut and Azar as Izanagi more than giving sudden credence to Amaterasu.

    It's too late for me to comment on more, but the rest is not a bad start, per se.

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