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Where I Read: Mummy the Curse 2e

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  • #16
    Originally posted by nothri View Post
    Oh I see. Well, I guess if you say its invalid it must be invalid. I mean, a clever demon is by far the most likely to be detected compared to a clever mummy, but if you've taken that into account, which you surely must have if you have determined my point is invalid, then obviously my point is invalid and that's that. The spy most likely to be exposed is the superior spy. End of discussion, I guess.
    Well, since you seem to have missed identifying a humorous response even when it’s flagged with a 😜 I think both mummy *and* demon spies are safe from your detection. 😁

    But feel free to keep taking free-flowing commentary on supernatural horror games as personal attacks, I guess.


    Writer. Developer. World of Darkness | Chronicles of Darkness | The Trinity Continuum

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    • #17
      The who's more clever, a demon or mummy reminds me of the Princess Bride




      Also, any chance we'll see sample settings or story hooks in the future since mummies jump around in time?

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      • #18
        Originally posted by branford View Post
        Also, any chance [/URL]we'll see sample settings or story hooks in the future since mummies jump around in time?
        My magic 8 ball says signs point to yes.


        Writer. Developer. World of Darkness | Chronicles of Darkness | The Trinity Continuum

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        • #19
          Hey Bunyip does this mean you wrote for Mummy Curse 2e? (You might have said something about this earlier and if so my bad but as I don't know I figured I'd ask.)

          Beyond that the whole idea of getting ideas and hooks for future points for Mummies is very very VERY awesome!!!!!

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          • #20
            Originally posted by LordHeru View Post
            Hey Bunyip does this mean you wrote for Mummy Curse 2e? (You might have said something about this earlier and if so my bad but as I don't know I figured I'd ask.)

            Beyond that the whole idea of getting ideas and hooks for future points for Mummies is very very VERY awesome!!!!!
            I did, yes.

            And here’s something Matthew shared with the rpg.net Mummy discussion a few days ago:

            At least one of the story hooks in the book is based on your mummies waking up on Mars at an uncertain point in the future, so yes, future play is definitely possible.


            Writer. Developer. World of Darkness | Chronicles of Darkness | The Trinity Continuum

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Bunyip View Post

              I did, yes.

              And here’s something Matthew shared with the rpg.net Mummy discussion a few days ago:
              Awesome. Cool stuff.

              And yeah I saw that and sort of laughed in glee at the idea that future play is in the cards.

              What is even more interesting is the fact that for the Mummy to wake up on Mars at some point his body has to have been brought there. That or some other confluence of events made said location a nexus point for his awakening. Which is awesome. Very very very awesome.

              One more full day and then we get to see the mechanics chapter, which I can't wait for as I want to see the template, merits, Sekhem, the Pillars, Affinities, and Utterances. All the really good crunchy stuff.

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              • #22
                Maybe the Mars setting is during the next Sothic Turn in the year 3,473‬

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                • #23
                  The Decrees
                  Overall I'm really enjoying the Decrees. Whereas the Guilds represent a mummy's approach to the afterlife, their role, and their mortal lives, Decrees represent their self and their Memory in that it's how they managed to stand up to the Judges in the first place. The Guilds talk about how certain mummies are tempted to Apotheosis, but the Decrees talk about how much of an uphill battle their existence is to begin with.

                  I like the Affinities. Everything's clicking except the Ashem's Why You Serve Us section where, in second person, it says to "flip fate the bird" and it really jaunted me out of the mood of the game. "Edgy" is too strong or specific of a word, but it just makes me think of like...I don't know. I can't picture a 5,000 year old mummy being like, "Yeah, man, flip him off. Like, whatever, man."

                  The Judges
                  Yeah, this will be hard to get used to. I know including a paragraph each for 42 Judges like in first edition might be overkill I still wish they were here. I suppose if second edition were your introduction to the game having seven choices is plenty, and it'll probably help portray the Judges more actively in the world, unlike how distant they were in first edition. Also not sure about being able to switch Judges, because that somewhat dilutes the theme of living under the weight of history and how difficult it is to escape your past, but it's probably not a big deal.

                  "DROWN THEIR TRANSGRESSIONS IN BLOOD." We're off to a good start. As I read through the Judges I can feel how good of a choice it was to go into a little more depth on a handful of them; so many wondered, "What do mummies do in this game other than chase relics?" Well, if fighting monsters, journeying through the centuries, and manipulating and leading cults weren't enough for you, now we see an old purpose re-emphasized: they fight crime.

                  Next up is Chapter Two, but first! Can someone just remind me in a sentence or two how the Judges, Shan'iatu, and the Iremite gods relate to each other? The Shan'iatu rebelled against the gods so they could be Judges? It's been years since I read Dreams of Avarice.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by reseru View Post
                    Next up is Chapter Two, but first! Can someone just remind me in a sentence or two how the Judges, Shan'iatu, and the Iremite gods relate to each other? The Shan'iatu rebelled against the gods so they could be Judges? It's been years since I read Dreams of Avarice.
                    With the caveat that I don't know how some of this may have changed yet:

                    The Shan'iatu — or at least the temakh at their cores — were the left hands to the Judges' right; they were what Mage might describe as sub-souls of the greater cosmic beings they served, which was precisely why their scheme ultimately failed — the Judges could not meaningfully relinquish their posts to their would-be usurpers, because their usurpers were essentially themselves.

                    The Iremite gods are sort of a mix of things; Sutekh was sibling to the Judges, born at the culmination of Creation's frantic self-justifying frenzy of generation by Kephera and Atum, and as the one child that did not drive his parent to despair, seized/was bestowed the highest authority of the bunch, which is why the Judges created the temakh to carry out his demand to satisfy Ammut's hunger with a wager instead of a down payment.

                    Anpu and Re are the two eyes of Sutekh, cast out of himself to rule in Duat and look upon the Scroll of Ages as the impetus for the twofold antes of living under the Law of Suffering; having deprived himself of his agency thereafter with the loss of his eyes, Sutekh's generative organs were refashioned into Azar, who acted as the voice of the Judges for the temakh and charged them with the instruction of the Remet and was later made the ruler of Duat in Anpu's place.

                    Ultimately, the gods are beneath the Judges in Iremite cosmology but were bestowed Will by Sutekh's passing as everything was; the Judges took names when they made the temakh, who served Azar in the same way that the Judges bent the knee to Sutekh.


                    Resident Lore-Hound
                    Currently Consuming: Hunter: the Vigil 1e

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by reseru View Post
                      The Decrees
                      Overall I'm really enjoying the Decrees. Whereas the Guilds represent a mummy's approach to the afterlife, their role, and their mortal lives, Decrees represent their self and their Memory in that it's how they managed to stand up to the Judges in the first place. The Guilds talk about how certain mummies are tempted to Apotheosis, but the Decrees talk about how much of an uphill battle their existence is to begin with.

                      I like the Affinities. Everything's clicking except the Ashem's Why You Serve Us section where, in second person, it says to "flip fate the bird" and it really jaunted me out of the mood of the game. "Edgy" is too strong or specific of a word, but it just makes me think of like...I don't know. I can't picture a 5,000 year old mummy being like, "Yeah, man, flip him off. Like, whatever, man."
                      Keep in mind when they wake up, Arisen don't remember most of those years. A good cult often ends up with an Arisen who is, mentally, a very young man.

                      Also, the Ashem are people who think Rick Sanchez's childhood never ended, pointing to all the times he rants about how meaningless life is, and only growing more certain when he explains his reasoning. Telling the impersonal forces of the world where exactly they can stick their concerns about how big the universe is sounds like something from the Sheut, especially when they're in full life coach mode. I'm planning on my Ashem's catchphrase being "Life is a joke." When pressed why she never actually seems to abusing her cults or tearing down the whole edifice, she reveals the hidden part: "Punching up's funnier."


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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Satchel View Post
                        ...Ultimately, the gods are beneath the Judges in Iremite cosmology but were bestowed Will by Sutekh's passing as everything was; the Judges took names when they made the temakh, who served Azar in the same way that the Judges bent the knee to Sutekh.
                        Ah, great; thank you. So Sutekh was the effective leader, and sibling of the Judges, made the temakh to ultimately stave off Ammut from destroying everything, then the gods were made from bits of Sutekh, while the Shan'iatu sought to replace the Judges by killing one of the gods. Wild.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by reseru View Post
                          Ah, great; thank you. So Sutekh was the effective leader, and sibling of the Judges, made the temakh to ultimately stave off Ammut from destroying everything, then the gods were made from bits of Sutekh, while the Shan'iatu sought to replace the Judges by killing one of the gods. Wild.
                          Sutekh did not EVER lead the Judges. Sutekh rejected the Judges when they agreed to appease the Devourer by giving her everything not them, in order to prevent her from consuming reality. Sutekh said people should at the very least get the chance to not be eaten. There was a compromise, people would get a chance to prove to be better, but the 42 sellouts would make the determination, they would get to Judge if we get consumed by primordial entity that thinks souls are delicious.

                          That is something I think is a tad important to the cosmology. The Judges oppose the embodiment of Will. Self determination has been a thorn in their side since they became aware of it.


                          Thoughts ripple out, birthing others

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                          • #28
                            Yeah, I knew and remembered Sutekh was the rebel who embodied self-determination, but I guess by saying “effective leader” I meant that he was the foremost among them.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by reseru View Post
                              Yeah, I knew and remembered Sutekh was the rebel who embodied self-determination, but I guess by saying “effective leader” I meant that he was the foremost among them.
                              He explicitly takes the crook and the flail in the account of Dreams of Avarice, so it's not terribly far off-base.


                              Resident Lore-Hound
                              Currently Consuming: Hunter: the Vigil 1e

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by reseru View Post
                                The Judges[/INDENT]Yeah, this will be hard to get used to. I know including a paragraph each for 42 Judges like in first edition might be overkill I still wish they were here.
                                Yeah, I had much the same reaction to this section. I loved that I now have a much better idea of how Judges inform the Arisen who serve them, what they actually stand for, and how to use them in a game. That's all awesome. But I have mixed feelings about Judges allowing Arisen the freedom to swap between patrons when the very idea of that kind of choice seems antithetical to the idea of Mummy, and the exclusion of the remaining 35 Judges feels strange. They wouldn't need to have the same level of write-ups, the seven super detailed ones work pretty well as examples that I can pretty easily use to extrapolate how the remaining 35 would work, but having those 35 missing entirely bothers me. The explanation that they are excluded because they concern themselves with narrow or conceptual transgressions is particularly strange in light of some of the Judges they opted not to include. I mean, setting aside the question of whether or not sexual violence should be so explicitly part of a game's fabric, one of the Judges that I can think of that they didn't include was Uamenti. Is rape considered narrow or conceptual when some of the Judges that did make the cut include non-state sanctioned acts of mass slaughter (that feels pretty narrow in scope to me) or simply "pride" (surely the definition of conceptual?). No significant percentage of Arisen consider it worthwhile pursuing such a serious crime that impacts a considerable portion of the population? Had they included the other 35 in shorter write-ups they could have reframed Uamenti if they weren't comfortable with the nature of that Judge, but its omission entirely creates the worst of both worlds in my head where its existence is presumed but the crime it stands against is minimalised by its exclusion from the list of important Judges.

                                There are surely other examples of worthwhile Judges that I would need to actually look at my book to recall, but I'm assuming that the presumption is that people will come to the second edition without any baggage from the first edition. That is 100% fair and I don't mind setting aside my prior knowledge, but it's nevertheless jarring on a certain level as someone who did spend a lot of time in first edition (presumably a reasonably sized portion of the target demographic of this book). I think my preferred route will be to reference the first edition book in my game for an expanded list of Judges

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