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Judges - Are they Great Old Ones or Idigama?

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  • #76
    Originally posted by Satchel View Post
    It's a pat simplification in general, but the Annunaki presumably have a similar relation to the world as the True Fae do: just like not all of the Gentry manifest their Titles as Keepers and other forms intent upon some stolen element of the waking world, much (inasmuch as "much" means anything in a place where quantity doesn't really exist) of the Abyss seems unconcerned with material reality unless it bothers them; that the hostility of the Abyss appears to have increased from the perspective of linear time as the Phenomenal World's history has moved on could be sampling bias or it could be indicative of the reality-hating elements of the Abyss getting more of their tendrils in the Tapestry, but for the most part the default state of an Abyssal entity in its normal state seems to be indifference to the world generated by the Supernal.

    By a similar tone, albeit at a reduced scale, the chthonians of Geist explicitly don't care about the ghosts around them unless they've stumbled into a hunting ground somewhere on the Rivers or elsewhere, being largely content to just eat each other and filter feed on the Essence carried down from the living world. No verdict yet on whether the Chthonic Gods (should they really exist) have any direct relation to the never-born "natives" of the Underworld, but the directive they impose upon Reapers is sufficiently interested-in-people that it somewhat outweighs their mythic scope.

    And then there's Weird Shit In The Anima Mundi, for which "psychic superbeings from the dreams of the world itself" initially sounds comprehensible until you remember that it's the source of a couple particularly worrying Legacies like the Unforgotten Scions and the Morphean Continuity; there's things in the Dreamtime that humanity only has tenuous terminology for, and many of them are content to go about their business beyond the Omphalos without ever seeing human contact.
    Thanks Satchel. It's a pat simplification to attempt to jam down unknowable entities into knowable game systems (or at least mythology)--but we'll do it!

    I'm not an expert on Lovecraft, Mythos or the well-regarded games that utilize them, so if you'll humor me a moment I'll toss out a few names and maybe you all might suggest which broad bucket they might fall into? I'll do further research based on targeting.

    * Shub-Niggurath
    * Yog-Sothoth
    * King in Yellow (ok, Chambers not Lovecraft)

    While a few of the Mythos creations are in fact oblivious to man's sentience, others seem quite engaged and have distinctly Egyptian themes to them. These seem like good attributions to Judges in my quite novice eye.

    The ones above are harder, however.

    --Khanwulf

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    • #77
      The Mythos isn't entirely staffed with entities that are unconcerned with humanity. The Migo go out of their way to harvest brains for example. And Narlehotep looks like a human and goes around doing wonder-shows for humans. Perhaps more disturbing is the possibility that Narlehotep doesn't look like humans but that humans look like Narlehotep and that if they go out into space and meet other civilizations we will be the ones that resemble cosmic horrors. Or perhaps even be them to others.

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      • #78
        Originally posted by Exthalion View Post
        The Mythos isn't entirely staffed with entities that are unconcerned with humanity. The Migo go out of their way to harvest brains for example. And Narlehotep looks like a human and goes around doing wonder-shows for humans. Perhaps more disturbing is the possibility that Narlehotep doesn't look like humans but that humans look like Narlehotep and that if they go out into space and meet other civilizations we will be the ones that resemble cosmic horrors. Or perhaps even be them to others.
        Well, can look like a human; a lot of Nyarlathotep's forms very much aren't.


        Scion 2E: What We Know - A wiki compiling info on second edition Scion.

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        • #79
          Originally posted by Exthalion View Post
          Perhaps more disturbing is the possibility that Narlehotep doesn't look like humans but that humans look like Narlehotep and that if they go out into space and meet other civilizations we will be the ones that resemble cosmic horrors. Or perhaps even be them to others.
          Tangental, but relevant to the concept of the cosmic horror of the Other:

          Years ago there was a series of probably YA sci-fi books in which the alien races were all herbivorous, innately peaceful creatures because the predatorial, conflict-driven ones immolate themselves prior to achieving superluminal travel. Man is encountered by a collective of such aliens that happens to be locked into a losing war with a (also herbivorous) psychic slaver alien race.

          They decide the risks of using Man are worth it and hire humans as mercenaries. The results are hilarious, since even the (volunteer, trained, armed) females have such highly-developed predatory instincts, optimized muscle and bone density and other violent adaptations that they tear enemy platoons to shreds. The larger, even more aggressive male humans are such a savage terror on the battlefield (and off it) that they leave the collective almost wetting themselves.

          It was both an amusing and sobering look at Man.


          --Khanwulf

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          • #80
            Originally posted by Khanwulf View Post

            Tangental, but relevant to the concept of the cosmic horror of the Other:

            Years ago there was a series of probably YA sci-fi books in which the alien races were all herbivorous, innately peaceful creatures because the predatorial, conflict-driven ones immolate themselves prior to achieving superluminal travel. Man is encountered by a collective of such aliens that happens to be locked into a losing war with a (also herbivorous) psychic slaver alien race.

            They decide the risks of using Man are worth it and hire humans as mercenaries. The results are hilarious, since even the (volunteer, trained, armed) females have such highly-developed predatory instincts, optimized muscle and bone density and other violent adaptations that they tear enemy platoons to shreds. The larger, even more aggressive male humans are such a savage terror on the battlefield (and off it) that they leave the collective almost wetting themselves.

            It was both an amusing and sobering look at Man.


            --Khanwulf

            You may be thinking of the Damned Trilogy by Alan Dean Foster. If so, it wasn't just the females, but old ladies. The first human the aliens got into contact with was trying to keep humanity out of the war so chose the worst group of initial volunteers they could find. They all came back having loved the experience and doing disturbingly well.

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            • #81
              Originally posted by Exthalion View Post


              You may be thinking of the Damned Trilogy by Alan Dean Foster. If so, it wasn't just the females, but old ladies. The first human the aliens got into contact with was trying to keep humanity out of the war so chose the worst group of initial volunteers they could find. They all came back having loved the experience and doing disturbingly well.

              That's it exactly. Thanks!

              An overt plot point is the question: "Once your alien monster has won the war for you, what do you do with it?"

              --Khanwulf

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