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Nameless Torment: A new kind of Immortal for Mummy 2e

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  • Nameless Torment: A new kind of Immortal for Mummy 2e

    Hey folks! Here's a first draft of a new type of immortal - the Nameless. They're part of a series of new immortals I've been putting together who are significantly more potent and also a lot more weird than the lesser immortals in the new Mummy 2e core, each with some sort of association with one of the five Pillars (even if veeeeery loose or only theoretical) - these guys are for Ren. These guys in particular are, I have to admit, quite blatantly inspired by the Nameless One of Planescape: Torment, and also the lengthiest write-up of the new ones I've done so far. Take a look and let me know what you think!

    The other drafts I've done so far are the koldun/heartless, powerful blood-sorcerers who keep their hearts sealed away in safety, and ghostwalkers/shadowless, necromancers short-cutting to a fragile immortality who must contend with their own dark reflection. My intention is to put a final series of all five up on the Storyteller's Vault once the new Mummy book is out and released; for now, I've put provisional first drafts of both of those up on my Patreon ( https://www.patreon.com/acrozatarim ) if you want to a look at those ones too.

    For now, here's the Nameless.

    Nameless Wanderers

    The Nameless present a strange phenomenon, especially to the Scribes among the Arisen who find them so fascinating. They are both powerful and yet diminished; immortal, but losing something of themselves with each death they experience. Arisen who have a chance to study the Nameless see something of the mummy’s own experience in these Endless and the inevitable collapse of each subsequent personality the immortal bears, but the Nameless have done something that seems unthinkable to the Arisen, something blasphemous; they are, as the title suggests, without name. Not something so petty as a mere moniker that others know them by, of course, but the true name, the Ren itself—the very identity and nature of the Nameless has been scoured away, tossed aside to unmoor them from the flow of time and to shatter the inevitability of oblivion.

    The Nameless are monstrous; they’re parasites of pain, drawing their power from the anguish and emotion of those who they catch in the orbit of each life. They’re dangerous, since the Memory of the Arisen is a particularly potent source of power to them. They’re often pathetic, losing themselves to one stripe of madness or another before the current personality is extinguished in the fading fire of self. And yet… and yet they have an allure of their own. Some Arisen believe the Nameless to be a personification of the Law of Suffering, a direct representation of the Judges’ own intent, and they certainly do stir the flow of Sekhem through the world with the torment they leave in their wake. A Nameless can be a potent ally, at least for a time.

    But in the end, they’re without something vital, something essential. In the hekau of the Arisen, the name matters. If the Nameless are without such a fulcrum of existence… what are they?

    Becoming Nameless
    Even among immortals, Nameless are rare. There’s no particularly proven path to becoming one, and in many cases a Nameless achieves her state not because she desired this specific form of immortality but because she failed in her attempt to achieve another—and failed dramatically, in a manner that inflicted catastrophic metaphysical consequences. Every Nameless should, as far as the universe is concerned, be dead. The world’s fundamental magic does not treat them as living; but their paradoxical nature ensures that nor can they be treated as without life. Maybe half of Nameless come about in this misbegotten manner—errors that reality struggles to cope with and cannot quite understand how to resolve.

    A few Nameless manage to achieve the path purposefully and independently, drawing on nightmarish or foolish sorcery to hide themselves or scour their identity away. Most would-be Nameless entirely erase themselves from existence, and the context needed to achieve Namelessness in this way requires unusual confluences to enact—as such, each self-made Nameless is entirely unique. One manages to breach the Underworld with crude magic and finds his way to a distant rivulet of dead water that flows only under a specific alignment of lifeless planets, following it to the shore of an expanse that should not still exist, and bathes until his name bleeds out of his mouth and is swallowed down by the waiting god-thing there. Another anneals her name into that of a potential saviour, a blessed figure who can bear her sins, and then murders then so that her identity dies with them. Trying to reenact the path that a prior Nameless has walked is an invitation for disaster.

    Others find their Namelessness with help. Some Scribes collect tales of this blasphemous act; petitioners seek dead witch-queens who stir in ancient temples that speak of a second Irem, or walk to the edge of eternity along unknown paths and kneel before non-gods, or seek out a servant of Ammut and offer up their Ren alone to oblivion’s maw, or hunt out the whispers of the Eater of Names and embrace its blessing even as it takes something fundamental from them. One line of belief has it that all these sources of Namelessness are actually one, a single being—perhaps Ammut—that steals these names away to feed itself or wield them as terrible tools. Perhaps each different story is just a separate manifestation of such an entity, or perhaps they are in turn servants to that greater force and bear a fragment of its power. The Nameless themselves can offer little insight, because none of them can remember.

    Enduring Namelessness
    The first time the Nameless dies is the moment of their creation—the pivot from named to unnamed, from alive to… whatever it is the Nameless become. The symbolic death of the name being torn free wipes the slate clean, and the Nameless awakens without memories of their own identity.

    The new Nameless does not experience the same foundational lack as a newborn. Muscle memory remains, as does a certain amount of fundamental and general understanding; the Nameless comprehends concepts they knew before they died, such as what a car is, or if someone is being threatening, or that people live in houses and don’t run around naked. This isn’t some sort of senility, but simply the excision of memory and nature. The Nameless can recall nothing of their prior life, or of who they were, but is otherwise relatively functional and retains instinctive capabilities. A Nameless who was a dangerous combatant beforehand remains one now—she just doesn’t know how or why she followed that path. A silver-tongued liar is just as capable as being mendacious—but he may no longer feel the desire to lie, or even finds it offensive to the new moral framework he builds for himself.

    The new Nameless has an extremely strong sense of self-identity—it’s just entirely fresh and new, ready to be filled out by their new experiences and discoveries. That identity remains absolutely ironclad regardless of how those experiences might break a normal human; the Nameless is shaped by new traumas or travails, but never flinches in their self-belief. What breaks a Nameless, over time, is not exposure to horrors but simply the repeated experience of death.

    A Nameless is immortal—to a point. She is incredibly resilient, her undying form repairing damage at a rapid rate, and she doesn’t age. If killed, she will soon revive. Total bodily destruction isn’t enough to stop her; she’ll reform from the ashes. Inventive methods might trap a Nameless, but usually only for a while; a Nameless can chip or scrape her way out of any prison with time, and burying one in concrete merely means her pulverized remains will reform on the surface instead. However, each death chips away at that iron core of self-identity. It slowly drives the Nameless mad, breaking her on the wheel of resurrection.

    Eventually, she loses everything and… the process starts again. A final death pushes the Nameless’ new identity too far and it simply shatters. She wakes afresh, remembering nothing of what came before in her past lives, her self-identity strengthened and newly empowered.

    But this time, it takes just a little less to push her to the brink again.

    These experiences of death strengthen the Nameless; each annihilation of self isn’t quite total, instead burning a particular mark of suffering and eternity into her soul from which she can draw power. Yet as the descent is a little shorter each time, the cycle begins to move more swiftly; the Nameless needs fewer deaths to wipe her identity clean, and emerges more potent yet less spiritually whole than before, and so things escalate until the final descents that the Nameless experiences are dizzyingly swift from the perspective of immortality.

    There’s two ways off this Endless train. The first is to let the cycle run its course; to die so many times, live as so many new personalities, that eventually even Namelessness falls away. At the culmination, these ruined lives and the suffering they have seen forge a new Ren, a shining and brilliant and glorious one—and the Nameless, now re-Named, returns to one final life. Die this time, and it’s for good. No other form of Endlessness can shake the inevitability of her demise; her new Name is seared too deep into the fabric of reality.

    The other means is to rediscover the immortal’s original Ren—or to make a new one via incredibly potent occult means. It’s not enough for an Arisen or magician to simply ‘declare’ a new name via powerful Ren hekau, and finding one’s original Ren when it was tossed into the maw of Ammut is a perilous prospect indeed. A restoration of original Ren returns the immortal’s first persona, and grants them comprehension of all their lives since—likely a traumatic experience in and of itself. Occult rumors swirl that a constructed Ren, one prized from the gates of Duat itself or stolen from the mad gods of otherworldly realms, can offer a Nameless something truly powerful—the opportunity to make their future self entirely in accordance with their desires. Needless to say, no sturdy record of prior successes exists as a foundation upon which to build such ventures. Everything about the reclamation of Ren lies purely in the realm of supposition and theory. Any Nameless who have Named themselves keep their nature hidden, along with any prize they may have seized from their apotheosis.

    Nameless Suffering
    The Nameless are vortices of suffering and passion. They attract those experiencing anguish, burning with dark ambitions, or who are simply lost in a world they struggle to come to terms with. Falling into the orbit of a Nameless gives the suffering something to cling onto, a sense of purpose, but in many cases it’s twinned with further misery; the Nameless draw power from the lost and the damned, and often cultivate misery and desire in those around them, whether intentionally or instinctively.

    Every time a Nameless perishes and returns, the suffering she has surrounded herself with will likely mark her in some way. These soul marks mar the Endless’ flesh; some are literal scars, others tattoo-like shapes, scarification patterns, elaborate images, even actual messages welling up as swathes of literature beneath the skin. The more an Endless dies, the more soul marks bubble forth in this way; a Nameless near the end of a cycle has much of her body covered in them, though rarely ever touching the face. A final death that resets the Nameless’ personality washes away almost all the soul marks, but some remain burned in deep, becoming firm anchors that persist from reincarnation to reincarnation.

    Soul marks are powerful, and reflect some significant event or some moment of suffering that the Nameless caused during a life now past. They’re often linked to the companions—or victims—who the Nameless has caught in her orbit, and may include symbols relating to a specific person. If an engineer called Rose fell in love with the Nameless and ultimately gave her life for him even though he never returned her affections, his next life might see a burn-mark that’s oddly angular and machine-like in appearance, or a tattoo of a rose, or a swirling pattern that reflects the waves at the beach she would bring the Nameless to in hopes that he would find it somewhere in his undying heart to love her too. From Rose’s loss, the Nameless gains; he remembers her knack for fixing engines and feels that same talent in his own hands, or recalls the burning resentment she sometimes felt at a man who would not, perhaps could not, love her back and uses the dying embers of that passion to stir it in others. Thus are soul marks often a cruel record of a Nameless’ existence. Sometimes they become something else, a memorial to friends and fellows lost, or passions whose bearers have perished yet the Nameless decides to shoulder and carry forth; but most Nameless bear far more soul marks of suffering caused than of causes for which people suffered.

    To a Nameless, the Arisen present a powerful allure. Most soul marks come from mortals who have broken or suffered; but with Arisen, the Nameless feed from Memory instead. When an Arisen loses something of himself, when the cruel sands of time grind away at his own identity and understanding of his being, a Nameless instinctively absorbs some of the flayed recollection in a flush of potency. When a Nameless manifests a soul mark after a life in which she was involved with such Memory loss, the mark is drastically empowered. Thus, to a Nameless, the Arisen are invigorating and ultimately strengthening.

    By comparison, Nameless and the suffering around them provide a rich bounty of Sekhem; such lives wrung through the intensity of a Nameless’ involvement are fertile ground for the creation of Vestiges. Some Arisen seek out Nameless with the intent of exploiting this, and may even consider the scraps of their own Memory a worthy trade to offer. It’s a dangerous bargain to make, though. A Nameless who comes to understand that an Arisen’s wounded identity can strengthen her may start intentionally arranging for situations that threaten the Arisen’s Memory on purpose, hoping to harvest greater power from the relationship.

    Creating A Nameless Character
    Nameless are a kind of Endless, the lesser immortals who the Arisen sometimes encounter, but they don’t follow the usual rules for Endless such as Blood Bathers or Eternals. They don’t have a Sekhem rating, nor do they access the Gift of Years or its derived merits. However, they can still be Invested, and hold the same tier of cultist as other immortals if this occurs.

    Nameless: A Nameless has no name for any supernatural purposes. Whatever name she calls herself is meaningless at an occult level. Magical effects that require the user target a name or identity known to them will simply fail to affect a Nameless, and a Nameless cannot be magically tracked, scryed upon, or bound.

    Madness: A Nameless always has the Madness Condition and cannot resolve it normally. If a supernatural effect would remove it permanently, it instead suppresses the Condition for a scene.
    Immortal: A Nameless does not age. She regenerates damage at a rate of 1 bashing damage per turn, 1 lethal damage per minute, and 1 aggravated damage per 15 minutes. If killed, she returns to life after one scene with her health track fully restored; if the death occurs via heavy bodily damage, or even total bodily destruction, she instead returns to life within a day. Death removes all Conditions, Tilts, and other supernatural affects that may be lingering on the Nameless other than her Madness Condition and any Soul Marks she possesses.

    Reincarnation: A new Nameless has her Integrity set to 10. She does not suffer breaking points and her Integrity cannot be changed by any means other than her death. Whenever she dies, her Integrity drops by 1. When her Integrity would drop to 0, the current personality is wiped clean and she reincarnates as a new, clean-slate personality, setting her Integrity to 10 – the number of True Soul Marks she now bears. If she has 10 True Soul Marks when she reincarnates—and thus would reincarnate to Integrity 0 again—she instead ceases to be Nameless, loses all but one True Soul Mark, and otherwise becomes a normal human being again; her Integrity resets to 9, she remembers the lives from her previous reincarnation cycle, and she cannot become any other form of Endless.

    Retinue: A Nameless builds potent magical connections to people around her. Anyone who has suffered an Integrity loss within the past year who meets and interacts with a Nameless can instinctively choose to regain that lost point of Integrity—but in return, they become entangled with the Nameless’ fate in this reincarnation. The intensity of the emotions they feel towards the Nameless—positive or negative—are inflamed, and the Nameless always treats them as having 3 fewer Doors for Social Maneuvering. When suffering an Integrity Breaking Point due to the Nameless’ actions, or because they’re undertaking an action on behalf of the Nameless’ desires or goals, such characters restore all expended Willpower points; whenever they would regain one point of Willpower for indulging their Vice when around the Nameless or following the Nameless’ goals, they instead regain two. A Nameless can maintain up to a dozen characters in this retinue, although both Nameless and retinue are unlikely to be consciously aware of this. A character leaves the retinue by either being away from the Nameless for at least a month, by dying, or by the active rejection of the Nameless; upon leaving the retinue, the character loses the dot of Integrity they had previously regained, and automatically dramatically fails the next Integrity Breaking Point they experience.

    Soul Marks: Whenever a Nameless revives from death, she may gain a Soul Mark. If, during the life now lost, she was present when a mortal suffered a Breaking Point due to the Nameless’ actions, or if a member of her retinue suffered a Breaking Point when carrying out the Nameless’ directions or just in order to gain the Nameless’ approval even without direction, the Nameless may roll her Integrity and gain a Soul Mark on a success. If either of the above conditions are met and the person involved actually failed the Breaking Point, the Nameless may automatically gain a Soul Mark. If during her last life any of her retinue died either acting in her service, while trying to gain her approval or please her, or while trying to kill her or cause her misery or loss, she gains a second Soul Mark. No matter how many events may satisfy the above conditions, a Nameless can only ever gain a single Soul Mark due to the first set of conditions and a single due to the second set upon a given death, for a maximum of two Soul Marks.

    When a Nameless reaches Integrity 0 and then reincarnates as a fresh clean-slate personality within her body, she gains Soul Marks as normal for her prior life after gaining a True Soul Mark (as per below), even though she has no recollection of that prior life.

    Soul Marks should be thematically connected to one of the events that met the conditions, or to a strong emotional or traumatic undercurrent to the Nameless’ own experiences or drives in her last lifetime.

    True Soul Marks: When a Nameless falls to Integrity 0 due to death and then reincarnates, she must choose a single Soul Mark from those she has gained and make it a True Soul Mark. True Soul Marks remain when reincarnation removes normal Soul Marks, and will persist with the Nameless until the end; however, each True Soul Mark lowers her starting Integrity at the beginning of a reincarnation cycle by 1. A Nameless cannot choose not to pick a True Soul Mark upon reincarnation.

    Arisen Memory: When in the presence of an Arisen who fails a Memory Breaking Point, the Nameless gains the Inspired Condition, refills all expended Willpower, and adds 1 to all her Attributes until the end of the story, which may raise them above 5; a Nameless cannot glean the Attribute bonus more than once a story, but repeats the other benefits each time the conditions are met. Furthermore, when the Nameless dies, if she has been in the presence of an Arisen who fails a Memory Breaking Point during her last life, or if she has personally taken actions that have led to an Arisen failing a Memory Breaking Point, she may choose one Soul Mark from the Memory Mark list instead of the normal Soul Mark list. She cannot take two Memory Marks in one death, even if she has two Soul Marks to pick, but a Memory Mark can be made permanent via a True Soul Mark as normal. Memory Marks don’t have to be thematically linked to events or experiences.

    Sekhem Generator: Vestiges created by a member of the Nameless’ retinue are always 1 dot higher in rating, and can reach 6 dots. Draining a Relic in the presence of a Nameless who has gained a Soul Mark from her last life causes the Relic to give up an additional point of Sekhem.

    Investment: If a Nameless is Invested by an Arisen, they gain additional Soul Marks equal to the number of Pillars Invested, and lose the associated Soul Marks if those Pillars are spent, withdrawn, or otherwise lost. If Invested with points of Ren, a Nameless gains Arisen damage resistance, and can spend a point of Ren if killed to revive in the presence of the Arisen instead of their current location (emerging as appropriate from somewhere out of view in the relevant scene). Additionally, if Invested with Ren, the Nameless is treated as the Arisen for supernatural purposes that rely on identity or name, and the Nameless always knows the exact position, emotional state, and physical well-being of the Arisen for as long as any Ren remains Invested.

    Soul Marks
    • Mark of Action: The Nameless gains +3 to Initiative and Speed. Once per scene, as a reflexive action, she can interrupt an attack against her to move up to her Speed, which may foil the attack as a result.
    • Mark of Betrayal: The Nameless cannot be ambushed or surprised under any circumstances. She gains the rote quality on dice pools to surprise or ambush others.
    • Mark of Blood: The Nameless’ unarmed attacks and grapples deal lethal damage, and once per scene she can inflict the Arm Wrack, Blinded, or Leg Wrack Tilts with a successful attack that deals damage.
    • Mark of Conspiracy: Once per scene as a reflexive action, the Nameless can curse a victim; they must roll the dice pool for their next rolled action twice, and choose the worse result.
    • Mark of Darkness: The Nameless can see perfectly in the dark. Once per scene when the Nameless is attempting to hide and she would be detected by a successful perception roll or by a spotter moving to a position that she cannot hide from, she can interrupt it to move up to her Speed; if her new position blocks the would-be spotter from perceiving her, she remains hidden and is not noticed.
    • Mark of Decay: The Nameless becomes immune to poison and disease.
    • Mark of Destruction: The Nameless ignores Durability when damaging objects or structures, and automatically adds her Strength in points of structure damage when damaging such.
    • Mark of Endurance: The Nameless treats extreme environments as 2 levels lower than they actually are, and does not need to sleep.
    • Mark of Glibness: The Nameless always increases her first impression with a target by 2 stages unless they are actively hostile to her, and once per scene she can apply the Swooned Condition to a target she interacts with.
    • Mark of Hatred: The Nameless no longer suffers wound penalties and cannot be knocked unconscious from damage nor suffer the Knocked Down Tilt.
    • Mark of Lies: Once per scene, the Nameless can tell whether a statement made by another character is a lie. Supernatural means can never detect whether the Nameless herself tells a lie. If Invested with Ren, the Nameless can make herself appear as the Investing Arisen at will.
    • Mark of Loss: The Nameless gains 2 points of armour at all times.
    • Mark of Love: The Nameless is treated as having the equivalent of a supernatural potency trait rated at 5, adding it to dice pools and traits where appropriate in place of Sekhem, Blood Potency, or the like.
    • Mark of Loyalty: The Nameless adds 2 to her Defence, and retains her Defence against firearms and other attacks that would usually ignore it.
    • Mark of Murder: Once per scene, the Nameless can make a single successful attack deal aggravated damage rather than bashing or lethal damage. This Mark can be taken multiple times to increase the uses per scene.
    • Mark of Passion: Once per scene, the Nameless can inflict the Berserk or Obsession Conditions on a target she has interacted with.
    • Mark of Potency: The Nameless raises one of her Attributes by 1; raises from the Mark of Potency may bring an Attribute above 5. This Mark can be taken multiple times.
    • Mark of Resilience: The Nameless gains 3 health levels.
    • Mark of Secrets: The Nameless can sense supernatural beings and effects in her immediate environment, including an instinctive understanding of what they are or do. The supernatural senses of others will not detect the Nameless’ own nature unless she wishes them to.
    • Mark of Skill: The Nameless chooses a skill; once per scene, she gains the rote quality on that skill. This Mark can be taken multiple times, either adding the rote quality more times a scene for a skill, or gaining the rote quality once per scene with a new skill.
    • Mark of Suffering: Once per scene, the Nameless regains one point of Willpower. This Mark can be taken up to three times to increase the uses per scene.
    • Mark of Triumph: Once per scene, the Nameless may turn a successful dice roll into an exceptional success.
    Memory Marks
    • Mark of Black Dust: The Nameless takes no damage from falling any distance, and can spider-climb up walls and across ceilings at her full Speed with no loss of Defence.
    • Mark of the Black Oasis: Once per scene, the Nameless can inflict the Blind, Deafened, and Mute Tilts to a single target.
    • Mark of Blazing Agony: The Nameless is immune to damage or negative effects from fire or smoke, whether natural or supernatural.
    • Mark of the Blood Fly: Once per scene as a Reflexive action the Nameless can turn into a swarm, creating the Swarm Tilt with a Size equal to twice her own; she can reform as an Instant action on her turn.
    • Mark of Bone Jaws: Damage the Nameless deals is never downgraded or reduced, whether by armour or supernatural means.
    • Mark of the Broken Hourglass: Once per scene, the Nameless can perform an interval of an Extended action as an Instant action instead of taking its normal time, or can remove the Gift of Years from another Endless until the end of the scene with her touch. The Nameless doubles her Speed.
    • Mark of the Deceived: Once per scene, the Nameless can reflexively and instinctively retarget any supernatural effect that targets her onto someone else present in the scene, whom she knows the name of.
    • Mark of the Eaten Name: The Nameless can hide in plain sight without any sort of penalty, as long as she remains still.
    • Mark of the Endless Sands: The Nameless regenerates at an increased rate of 2 bashing or 1 lethal per turn, and 1 aggravated damage per minute.
    • Mark of Forgotten Stars: The Nameless can see and physically interact with entities in Twilight, and see and can pass through Loci, Avernian Gateways, and other such otherworldly portals.
    • Mark of the Hollow Pyramid: Mundane weapons that strike the Nameless are destroyed after dealing damage.
    • Mark of Howling Fury: Once per chapter, the Nameless can apply the Collapsing Ceiling, Earthquake, Heavy Winds, Inferno, or Sandstorm Environmental Tilts until the end of the scene; the Nameless is unaffected by the Tilt in question.
    • Mark of Killing Words: The Nameless can make ranged attacks using her Manipulation + Occult, her sorcerous word a flensing weapon with a damage rating equal to her Composure. Enemies defend with their Resolve rather than their usual Defence score. She cannot attack if she cannot speak.
    • Mark of the Ochre Prince: Once per scene, the Nameless can inflict the Madness Condition and Insane Tilt on a single target.
    • Mark of the Opener of Ways: Once per scene, the Nameless can unlock any lock or barrier, or can create a door or passage where none existed before. At the end of the scene, such a created passage will vanish once more.
    • Mark of the Ragged Hierophant: Once per scene, the Nameless can create an Awakened Thrall in the same manner as the Awaken the Dead Utterance. The Nameless can maintain up to her Presence in Thralls at a time.
    • Mark of the Shadow That Follows: Once per scene, the Nameless can move adjacent to anyone she can see, at any distance; she steps from one place to another, passing through the brief spaces between heartbeats and sane thoughts.
    • Mark of Unfettered Insight: Once per scene, the Nameless can look into the past of a location or person present, witnessing events within up to the past week.
    • Mark of the Watcher: The Nameless is aware of the precise location and state of any living characters present in the scene.
    Last edited by Acrozatarim; 03-02-2020, 04:42 PM.


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  • #2
    This is a superficial response just at first glance at what clearly had a lot of work put into it, and I'm going to try to remember to come back and give this the full read it clearly deserves.

    But the immediate observation I have is: ironically, you might want to rename it, perhaps to the "Unnamed" or somesuch. "Nameless" is a term which is already used across Mummy in several places, in the context of apotheosis and of the various Iremite gods, to mean something very different from what ails these Ren-damaged immortals: beings who own their own true name and thus their own fate, which therefore strips the privilege of using it from any others, thus why no one can speak the true name of the Nameless Jackal. Doubling up on terms to mean opposite things gets messy.

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    • #3
      For clarity, because it's implied in the descriptive text but not in the mechanics section: Full reincarnation after hitting Integrity 0 removes any non-True Soul Marks apart from the one(s) acquired from the death that reset the character's personality, such that a character will never have more than eighteen Soul Marks attached to a given personality (assuming both criteria for Soul Mark acquisition are met each time the character dies and loses Integrity). Is this accurate?


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      • #4
        I do like how those immortals represent a stranger yet more powerful version of the Reborn, like the Minor Guilds did with the Eternals and the Harvesters. The way they sacrifice their names to some unseen powers, be it Ammut, the Abyss, the Eater of Names of whatever other foul power which feeds upon identity and thought, is also terrifying, and I could easily see them also interacting with Prometheans, both in how they relate for the search after identity and the pain of torment (even if one suffers and ignites it, and the other draws and feeds upon it).

        Also, suddenly I'm beginning to be paranoid between this homebrew and Hunger in the Black Land that the Eater of Names may very well be Ammut- a great plot hook for a Mummy/Werewolf Chronicles, IMO.


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        • #5
          Originally posted by Stupid Loserman View Post
          But the immediate observation I have is: ironically, you might want to rename it, perhaps to the "Unnamed" or somesuch. "Nameless" is a term which is already used across Mummy in several places, in the context of apotheosis and of the various Iremite gods, to mean something very different from what ails these Ren-damaged immortals: beings who own their own true name and thus their own fate, which therefore strips the privilege of using it from any others, thus why no one can speak the true name of the Nameless Jackal. Doubling up on terms to mean opposite things gets messy.
          I'm not too concerned about that - CofD is chock full of doubled-up terms and blurry lines. You make a reasonable point but the existing Nameless elements are minor enough overall, and this is just some extra material I'm kicking out, so I'd rather keep the punchy name here, and make the homage to the Nameless One clear.

          Originally posted by Satchel View Post
          For clarity, because it's implied in the descriptive text but not in the mechanics section: Full reincarnation after hitting Integrity 0 removes any non-True Soul Marks apart from the one(s) acquired from the death that reset the character's personality, such that a character will never have more than eighteen Soul Marks attached to a given personality (assuming both criteria for Soul Mark acquisition are met each time the character dies and loses Integrity). Is this accurate?
          Er, yes. Could have sworn I made it clear somewhere that the regular soul marks get washed away at the Integrity 0 full reset, but apparently not.

          That's why this sort of thing is a first draft

          Originally posted by LostLight View Post
          I do like how those immortals represent a stranger yet more powerful version of the Reborn, like the Minor Guilds did with the Eternals and the Harvesters. The way they sacrifice their names to some unseen powers, be it Ammut, the Abyss, the Eater of Names of whatever other foul power which feeds upon identity and thought, is also terrifying, and I could easily see them also interacting with Prometheans, both in how they relate for the search after identity and the pain of torment (even if one suffers and ignites it, and the other draws and feeds upon it).

          Also, suddenly I'm beginning to be paranoid between this homebrew and Hunger in the Black Land that the Eater of Names may very well be Ammut- a great plot hook for a Mummy/Werewolf Chronicles, IMO.
          Yeah, they're in an interesting position for interactions with other lines and the related themes of personality, memory, and suffering.

          As for the Eater of Names, that's definitely an interesting plot hook to run with! I can neither confirm nor deny anything relating to what the EoN actually is at this time, of course


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          • #6
            It was something I was expecting from the Immortals in the Corebook. Very good.

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            • #7
              To Mr. Chris Allen:
              Virtually everything you've generously given out as freebies for the CofD---particularly for WtF---have been used or will be used in my games.

              The Nameless looks impressive. I love the whole "memory vampire" vibe they got going on.

              Could you give us a few hints about the other immortals you're working on, that you mentioned at the start of this thread?

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              • #8
                Getting a very strong Planescape Torment vibe and i love it !


                .

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Demigod Beast View Post
                  Could you give us a few hints about the other immortals you're working on, that you mentioned at the start of this thread?
                  So the ones that I've popped up first drafts of on my patreon are the Koldun/Heartless for Ab - powerful sorcerers who hide their hearts away, unkillable unless the heart can be found; and the Ghostwalkers/Shadowless for Sheut - reality-glitched necromancers bound to their own ghosts, who existence treats as if they've died but they never actually did die. I'm planning some sort of consciousness bound into either the immortal's own mummified body or a prepared artificial body for Ba, where they're undying but have only limited bursts of activity (a bit like mummies in that respect), and some sort of glutton/devourer type for Ka, who must keep consuming Sekhem or other sacred energies to maintain their immortality.


                  - Chris Allen, Freelance Writer & Developer

                  ​Like my work? Feel like helping me stay supplied with tea? Check out my Patreon

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                  • #10
                    Awesome! Yeah, I purchased Geist: The Sin-Eaters 2e not long ago, so undead are really on my mind.

                    Speaking of Mummy2e, when is that bad boy coming? Is it already out to backers? If so, when is it being opened up to the general gaming public?

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Demigod Beast View Post
                      Speaking of Mummy2e, when is that bad boy coming? Is it already out to backers? If so, when is it being opened up to the general gaming public?
                      Geist's KS happened in summer of 2018 and the backer copy went out a year ago for errata gathering. Mummy's KS was five months ago.


                      Resident Lore-Hound
                      Currently Consuming: Hunter: the Vigil 1e

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                      • #12
                        Cool stuff. How would you recommend statting out an established Nameless for a starting character, as opposed to one who just took the trip, is at Integrity 10, and has no Soul Marks of any type?

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                        • #13
                          For an established Nameless, I guess it's probably a case of choosing an Integrity value and beginning with half the possible permanent Soul Marks for that level of the cycle.


                          - Chris Allen, Freelance Writer & Developer

                          ​Like my work? Feel like helping me stay supplied with tea? Check out my Patreon

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