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What is Hakkar-Zoser?

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  • What is Hakkar-Zoser?

    OK, so I have to admit that Hakkar-Zoser (Book of the Deceived, p.48) kind of confuses me. All of the other Temakhs have a pretty clear art that they invented/brought/practiced, but I don't really get the Hive-Soul. What is he the Shan'iatu of?



  • #2
    Originally posted by ajf115 View Post
    OK, so I have to admit that Hakkar-Zoser (Book of the Deceived, p.48) kind of confuses me. All of the other Temakhs have a pretty clear art that they invented/brought/practiced, but I don't really get the Hive-Soul. What is he the Shan'iatu of?

    Tattoos, body modification, and art using biological materials, largely. With more than a minor interest in natural beauty.


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    • #3
      "Who is Hakkar-Zoser? He is supposed to be Turkish. Some say his father was German. Nobody believed he was real. Nobody ever saw him or knew anybody that ever worked directly for him, but to hear Kobayashi tell it, anybody could have worked for Zoser. You never knew. That was his power. The greatest trick the Devil ever pulled was convincing the world he didn't exist. And like that, poof. He's gone."



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      • #4
        The other temakhs' Stereotypes sections provide some insight (and inspiration, revelation, visions, etc):

        The Musician: The interlocutors of [the Philosopher] enjoy proclaiming their prophetic minds, but after us, the only other mystics among our kind are [the Keeper]’s.
        The Dancer: There can be no doubt that our masters are of the same blood and that what we seek to harness is the same — one within, one without.
        The Philosopher: We understand them in essence, but not beyond. They are trusted allies who seek as we seek, but in the beasts beneath the stars rather than within the stars themselves.
        The Poet: Once upon a time, a king kept a crocodile as a pet. He admired the creature’s beauty and power. One day, he leaned too close and was eaten alive.
        The Singer: Guardians of an ancient and important art, their wisdom is one of the things keeping us from spiraling off into the outer dark after so much unlife.
        The Painter: What purpose is there in revelation without communication? A cavalcade of selfish mystics.


        It's also worth remembering that the temakhs lay claim to forms of artistic and cultural expression, besides being a fairly bitter pack of iconoclasts — the Philosopher doesn't lay claim to philosophy so much as cultural expressions of a rational lens, just as the Dancer's demesne is more motion than dance and the nuances of the Singer's craft is a little more broad-yet-particular than song.

        The Keeper's artform lends itself most directly to an iconoclastic lens, because, per the parable of the heron and the crocodile, the form is unimportant verging on counterproductive: "Know me, for all the bleating and carving and smearing of ink is but a veil for the hammering heart."

        It's the Philosopher's lesson from the opposite end — rather than extend the false divisions of reality unto atomistic meaninglessness, the Keeper holds sway over a recurrent return to the primal state other arts evoke through words and forms more singly and directly.

        It's why he's got so much truck with the archetypal and mad beggars and ecstatic hermits — cutting away the trappings of civilization is both the point and the means.


        Resident Lore-Hound
        Currently Consuming: Hunter: the Vigil 1e

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        • #5
          Basically, the goal of a Keeper's "Artform" is to inspire an epiphany born from irrational or instinctual experiences. Reason has to be suppressed and a dramatic insight learned from the madness that results. Fasting, ritual scarification, alchohol or stronger mind altering substances, sensory deprivation, I would allow all of these to work. Basically, they are seeking insight from chaos and madness, finding order in disorder. That's my take, at least.

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