Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

So... what is Mummy about?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    Originally posted by Varsovian View Post
    Thanks!

    See, I didn't know that Mummies might have any long-term projects... From what I read, Mummies wake up for short periods and might spend decades inactive. So, how does one plan anything when "living" like that? Also, it seemed to me that they were rather passive characters, waking up merely on behalf of their cults or the Judges...
    They cannot awaken under their own power. But the Cult is modeled as a series of merits, similar to...Sanctum, I guess? You pour points into it and choose what those points mean. So the Cult is another player and Storyteller tool.

    Also, Arisen plans take time. Eugenics, architecture, excavations, tracking down relics... These things can take lifetimes. In a game I ran for my wife, her Mummy started looking for a ruin in the 1300s and ended up across the Atlantic in the 1700s before she finally found it.


    "Nihhina kalekal-zidu kal masun, kal manudanadu. Nihhina kalekal-zidu nukal shaghu-desasudu — nihhina kalekal-zidu kal innu-desasudu udhkal samm." Arthur Ashe
    Check out my tumblr for Chronicles of Darkness-related musings
    He/him pronouns, please

    Comment


    • #32
      Remember that beneath the awesome power and fading memories, Mummies are still people. They still have thoughts and feelings and opinions which drive them. After the first rush of the Descent, an Arisen begins to remember who they are, what they have done in the past, and how their current actions may (or may not) fit into a broader pattern. On Sothic Turns, or when an Arisen has completed its First Purpose, it may have time to explore its own interests. Those interests can be just as diverse as any human. The actions of an Arisen who fought alongside the Spartacus Rebellion, urged its Cult to participate in the French Revolution, and ultimately relocated to a suburb in England where it spent the 60s and 70s trying to foster a Communist commune may have its own ideas of how to spend its free time once it awakens 40 years later to a tiny cult of mostly disillusioned academics than, say, a religious fanatic of the Su-Menent whose cultists have always ridden a wave of fundamentalist religion to encourage new recruits. Indeed, these two may be rivals who have clashed time and again over the course of history, and have long-running plots to undermine the other and steal their relics.

      More generally though, I encourage you to consider Cults as a big offshoot of the Mummy. The character of the Cult and its objectives are going to play a big role. A Cult can awake a Mummy and give it a purpose, any purpose, not just "chase this relic". Consequently, a Mummy's purpose might be anything its Cult wants. Gang-based cults might wake up a heavy hitter for a land grab, a corporate cult may wake its "primary asset" to wield control over fate and the minds of others to help in a hostile takeover, a small family-based cult may wake their god simply because tradition demands that the Arisen bear witness to the sacred union between two members. Because the Cult drives the purpose, an Arisen can be given an objective of literally anything their thoroughly human followers might want, which runs the full gamut of the human experience. Cursed Necropolis DC had some interesting ideas on how those cults might be influenced in turn by the Arisen's objectives (cultists in airport customs are hot property), so it's not a one-way street either.

      Comment


      • #33
        One other fun thing to consider: a Mummy chronicle can easily consist of switching between playing one of the Arisen and one or more mortals, be they loyal cultists, rival sorcerers, or angry hunters. In a game that already heavily incentivizes flashbacks in play, alternating perspectives fits and allows for new angles on the plot from the perspective of someone who isn't an amnesiac Egyptian slave/god.


        Call me Regina or Lex.

        Female pronouns for me, please.

        Comment


        • #34
          I see. Thanks for the replies, it really broadened my view of the game!

          I might end up buying this after all...

          Comment


          • #35
            Originally posted by Varsovian View Post
            Thanks!

            See, I didn't know that Mummies might have any long-term projects... From what I read, Mummies wake up for short periods and might spend decades inactive. So, how does one plan anything when "living" like that? Also, it seemed to me that they were rather passive characters, waking up merely on behalf of their cults or the Judges...

            How do they plan? With redundancies. And delegation. Mummies (typically?) create the plan, then have their Cults carry out the necessary action as they "sleep". Hopefully, the Cult sticks to the plan, and doesn't distort or subvert it over time. The mummy might leave instructions to wake the periodically to adjust and plot out the next phases.


            Malkydel: "And the Machine dictated; let there be adequate illumination."
            Yossarian: "And lo, it was optimal."

            Comment


            • #36
              Here's another suggestion if you are unsure about Mummy... start your game with the Assassination of Franz Ferdinand. The themes that have been associated with World War 1 are similar to those of Mummy. The elite of an empire who do not understand that the world has moved on from their time and that their traditions are no longer relevant. Decades of carefully laid plans, torn up not by the Wrath of God, but by the wrath of artillery barrages. Friends, allies, and support networks called away to fight a pointless war that can't be won with little chance of ever returning home.

              Swap between the story of the Mummies and the stories of their cultists, both in the trenches and "safe" at home. Watch as the mortal dilemmas mirrors those of the immortals.

              Also, Mummies can be active from anywhere from a couple months if they are brash and unwise, to several years if they are prudent and lucky. Unless a Mummy dies multiple times, they should be active for about 380 days if they descend as quickly as (in)humanly possible. Mummies also earn descent resets by taking the following actions:
              • Creating great monuments to Irem
              • Destroying greater Amkhat
              • Punishing those who violate their tombs
              • Dedicating the deaths of rivals to the Judges in front of witnesses
              • Saving the unlives of mummies of the same judge
              Each of these can be motive enough when a Mummy has no immediate purpose. More importantly, these restart the waning of Sekhem. If you're at Sekhem 1, that means you get another 180 days before you have to pick up the dice again. The Mummy's experience alternates between careful planning and frantic work, but a smart Mummy can last years at Sekhem 1 if they pick their battles carefully and don't piss off the judges. There are Mummies who cannonically made it all the way through WW1. They still aren't active for long periods of time, but most probably get a couple of years instead of a couple of months.


              CofD booklists:
              Beast I Changeling | Geist l Hunter l Mage | Mummy | Promethean | Vampire

              Comment


              • #37
                A similarly exciting flashpoint: the Arab Spring. While the power structures in North Africa and the Middle East are young to the Arisen, these were powerful nations brought low and reshaped by the common people, using brand-new technologies that didn't exist a mere few decades ago. As protests turn into clashes with police and then the military, old Cults draw upon their Arisen patrons to help turn the tide or just survive the chaos. What does it mean to the Deathless to see the common man, the laborers and common folk that likely echo their societal role when they lived as mortals so long ago, rise up and overthrow their rightful leaders? What do explosive bullets, jet fighters, and Twitter mean to creatures of bronze and papyrus? Do they attempt to prop up the failing old governments, shape the rising new order, or try to carve out petty kingdoms in the war-torn madness of Libya and Syria, ruling openly for the first time in centuries?

                One year later, the Sothic Turn hits.


                Call me Regina or Lex.

                Female pronouns for me, please.

                Comment

                Working...
                X