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  • Mummy as a Video Game

    There's a winding line of thought behind it, but what does everyone think of playing one of the Arisen in a God-of-War-esque kind of game? You could even say the icons indicating an enemy can be finished are in-universe signs from Fate.

    If any game-line lends itself to the kind of over-the-top mayhem and video-game-necessitated railroading, its Mummy, I think.


    Malkydel: "And the Machine dictated; let there be adequate illumination."
    Yossarian: "And lo, it was optimal."

  • #2
    Hm, the nature of the descent is a bit problematic in video games though. The two games that spring to mind are the Batman Arkham ones, where Batman's character model gets steadily more beaten up as the game progresses, and the Undead campaign of Warcraft III's Frozen Throne expansion. The former is just aesthetic, but that might be all you could get away with in an action game in order to convey the theme without frustrating the player. The latter had a mechanic wherein you started the campaign with a level 10 hero (Arthas) and he lost levels as the campaign progressed.

    The alternative would be constructing the game around Apotheosis, or running a game with a large focus on flashbacks, but I think the descent by its very nature is alien to how video games work. If you take the time to build up muscle memory relating to abilities you then lose, that's not usually going to lend itself to a good gaming experience.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Vent0 View Post
      There's a winding line of thought behind it, but what does everyone think of playing one of the Arisen in a God-of-War-esque kind of game? You could even say the icons indicating an enemy can be finished are in-universe signs from Fate.

      If any game-line lends itself to the kind of over-the-top mayhem and video-game-necessitated railroading, its Mummy, I think.
      I have to disagree. The game line that lends itself to something on the same level of brutality as God Of War is Werewolf. On top of that, your Uratha would need very high Primal Urge, tons of Gifts, crazy high Attributes/Skills and 4 to 5 dot Fetishes and Talens to play like Kratos. Let's not forget that the truly epic fights would probably take place in the Shadow against godlike Spirits. My honest suggestion for how to play an approximation of God Of War is to set the story in Pangaea, with the PCs and NPCs all tending toward a higher power level.

      As for what a video game of Mummy would be like, I'm reminded of specific aspects of very different games. Imagine what it would be like to play Majora's Mask without the option to rewind time, and every success or failure has a meaningful impact on the plot.

      The general atmosphere would be similar to that of Dark Souls: grim determination juxtaposed to a melancholic spiral into dehumanization. Helpful NPCs would be few and far in-between, and though you may get to see the whole world change over millennia, nothing seems new and you always feel trapped.

      Whatever powers you have would be awesome in a very Biblical sense, but the game would repeatedly offer opportunities to use these powers to pursue your own goals, making each personal mission a calculated risk.

      You would have recurring allies and enemies in the form of your Cult and other immortals, of course, with moral ambiguity being important to convey sensibly. The machinations of Fate and the revelations granted by increasing Memory could be handled like in Planescape: Torment. The ever present cosmic horror tying very different people together in terrible and glorious quests should definitely take cues from Eternal Darkness: Sanity's Requiem, Call Of Cthulhu: Dark Corners Of The Earth and the like.

      As for how searching for Relics and remnants of the Nameless Empire would be handled mechanically, I don't think it would need anything groundbreaking. A Metroidvania-esque exploration might do the trick, with incentives to re-visit cleared areas if you raise your Memory.

      All in all, it would not be a very empowering experience, so it would probably not be a triple A release. This could be mitigated by a greater focus on the possibility of Apotheosis as an almost Golden Ending, but the writers, composers and so on would have to be careful with the application of drama and psychological horror. Even if it was a commercial failure, I can definitely imagine it gaining a cult following (pun intended).

      I'd totally play it.
      Last edited by GibberingEloquence; 01-14-2016, 05:52 PM.


      "Fate is a cruel jester with a finely developed sense of irony." - Sir Night as portrayed by Leliel, The Horror Recognition Guide

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      • #4
        Planescape: Torment is the closest we'll ever get to a Mummy video game. It's about an amnesiac immortal dealing with the messes of his past lives and engaging in some pretty compelling philosophy.


        Just call me Lex.

        Female pronouns for me, please.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Azahul View Post
          Hm, the nature of the descent is a bit problematic in video games though. The two games that spring to mind are the Batman Arkham ones, where Batman's character model gets steadily more beaten up as the game progresses, and the Undead campaign of Warcraft III's Frozen Throne expansion. The former is just aesthetic, but that might be all you could get away with in an action game in order to convey the theme without frustrating the player. The latter had a mechanic wherein you started the campaign with a level 10 hero (Arthas) and he lost levels as the campaign progressed.

          The alternative would be constructing the game around Apotheosis, or running a game with a large focus on flashbacks, but I think the descent by its very nature is alien to how video games work. If you take the time to build up muscle memory relating to abilities you then lose, that's not usually going to lend itself to a good gaming experience.
          Well, one way is if each stage/mission/chapter is its own Descent. It's kind of like a timer, in that respect. Would it be brutal in that it forces your to be concerned with time and weaker towards the end? Yeah, but brutal games hardly stop players. The key, I think, is to get skilled at your Affinity based abilities, and be a bit lavish with Utterances to speed your way at first (high-tier Utterances being treated like a crutch, in this respect).

          Originally posted by GottaGoFeast View Post
          I have to disagree. The game line that lends itself to something on the same level of brutality as God Of War is Werewolf. On top of that, your Uratha would need very high Primal Urge, tons of Gifts, crazy high Attributes/Skills and 4 to 5 dot Fetishes and Talens to play like Kratos. Let's not forget that the truly epic fights would probably take place in the Shadow against godlike Spirits. My honest suggestion for how to play an approximation of God Of War is to set the story in Pangaea, with the PCs and NPCs all tending toward a higher power level.
          Well, I didn't mean God of War specifically, but more to bring to mind the slaughter-your-way-through-enemies and hit-enemy-with-special-finisher-now features. And Mummy is great for that (especially at high Sekhem, but even low Sekhem mummies aren't pushovers).

          Originally posted by GottaGoFeast View Post
          As for what a video game of Mummy would be like, I'm reminded of specific aspects of very different games. Imagine what it would be like to play Majora's Mask without the option to rewind time, and every success or failure has a meaningful impact on the plot.

          The general atmosphere would be similar to that of Dark Souls: grim determination juxtaposed to a melancholic spiral into dehumanization. Helpful NPCs would be few and far in-between, and though you may get to see the whole world change over millennia, nothing seems new and you always feel trapped.

          Whatever powers you have would be awesome in a very Biblical sense, but the game would repeatedly offer opportunities to use these powers to pursue your own goals, making each personal mission a calculated risk.

          You would have recurring allies and enemies in the form of your Cult and other immortals, of course, with moral ambiguity being important to convey sensibly. The machinations of Fate and the revelations granted by increasing Memory could be handled like in Planescape: Torment. The ever present cosmic horror tying very different people together in terrible and glorious quests should definitely take cues from Eternal Darkness: Sanity's Requiem, Call Of Cthulhu: Dark Corners Of The Earth and the like.

          As for how searching for Relics and remnants of the Nameless Empire would be handled mechanically, I don't think it would need anything groundbreaking. A Metroidvania-esque exploration might do the trick, with incentives to re-visit cleared areas if you raise your Memory.

          All in all, it would not be a very empowering experience, so it would probably not be a triple A release. This could be mitigated by a greater focus on the possibility of Apotheosis as an almost Golden Ending, but the writers, composers and so on would have to be careful with the application of drama and psychological horror. Even if it was a commercial failure, I can definitely imagine it gaining a cult following (pun intended).

          I'd totally play it.
          All great options.


          Malkydel: "And the Machine dictated; let there be adequate illumination."
          Yossarian: "And lo, it was optimal."

          Comment


          • #6
            I think Mummy would make a great indie-style game (I know it's kinda a broad term). I can see the resource management of dwindling powers be seen as rather intuitive in the video game world, where you typically become stronger rather than weaker, so that's why I see it as a great concept for an indie developer to run with

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            • #7
              I would propose Journey as a Mummy game.


              Just call me Lex.

              Female pronouns for me, please.

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              • #8
                Mummy would be haaaaard to add to any CofD MMORPG. Unlike other characters, you're only allowed to log in once a year, where you start at endgame doing the raids, but quickly become weak enough you hang with newbies and starter characters. I suppose itd be great for a casual gamer who never gets to play endgame contact otherwise. As for a normal game, I agree that the descent could be problematic. I mean, I could see some powergamers exploiting the system, trying to resurrect often and stay at high Sekhem, Memory be damned. I would say, then, that Memory would have to measure your "level". You cant unlock the endgame content (adventures in Irem and Duat, far distant pasts, random sidequests of little vignettes of character development) until high end memory. If you fail to raise memory by 2 points in a given descent, itll repeat similarly set scenarios (or, to speed the game along, your memory doesnt drop). I like the idea of returning to places once your memory is higher, possibly unlocking new content. Death Cycles make for a more believable extra lives mechanic (I can see it like death in WoW, except with npc ghosts and adventures available there, with Anpu as an npc quest giver type) The game would have to be designed around Memory, and Cult is where I see a lot of the customizability (The game would be impossible with freeform character creation, would hafta have a set main character with a set, unlockable history). Id love to see this done though, rather like all the assassin's creed games if the timelines were put in a blender. The endgame of apotheosis could be windowdressed into a final endgame trek through Duat to face your Judge... or possbily, youd have to face yourself as final boss (the slave versus the free).

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                • #9
                  I would love playing a RPG videogame about ancient Irem.


                  LAND OF THE DAMNED: SPAIN (Spanish): Land of the Damned: Spain, Kingdoms of Blood: Spain; Cities of the Damned: Barcelona, Valencia, Carthian Constitution (1812), Three Arrows Pact:

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                  • #10
                    I hope it'd sell better than the video game adaptation of The Scorpion King

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                    • #11
                      Mummy video game? Oh that's Darkest Dungeon.


                      “As democracy is perfected, the office of president represents, more and more closely, the inner soul of the people. On some great and glorious day the plain folks of the land will reach their heart's desire at last and the White House will be adorned by a downright moron.”

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                      • #12
                        I think the key to making a mummy video game work is either offer ways to slow or reverse your descent or offer a very none linear game play.

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                        • #13
                          Personally, I'd make a Mummy game as a mix of Crusader Kings and X-Com, gameplay-wise. You'd start by designing your mummy and your cult leader, determining their appearances, strengths and weaknesses, and defining personality traits, as well as add some personal touches to the cult, from picking the basic organization model to choosing the name, symbolism used and the beliefs that keep it all together.

                          Then, the game would progress to the "strategic view", where you'd be playing as the cult leader, with the goal of managing cult business - activities would include recruitment and expansion, seeking relics, infiltrating governments and keeping your secrets from them, interacting with rival cults, upgrading the cult headquarters and the mummy's tomb, and such. The cults, the governments and other important organizations would be run and staffed by NPCs pursuing their own motivations in the vein of Crusader Kings, including the NPCs that make up your own cult, so watch out for over-ambitious lieutenants and schisms in your own ranks!

                          For certain activities (recovering relics, assassinations, duking it out with other cults etc.) the game would let you enter a "tactical view" and run an assembled squad of cultists X-Com-style, with turn-based combat and elements of stealth (and maybe even some light puzzle solving, in the case of recovering relics from ancient tombs).

                          So, where does the mummy factor in all this? She's an asset - a very risky one to use, as the only time you'd have direct control over her would be if she was assigned to a squad running a mission in "tactical view", where you can have fun curbstomping the opposition with Affinities and Utterances for some time. Outside of that, and being able to assign a task to her upon calling her to life, she's an NPC like any other, realizing her motivations and reacting to events based on character traits you've chosen for her - and sometimes, ones she'd acquire in the course of play! As your cult expands, builds up her tomb and acquires relics and vestiges, you can call upon the mummy more often - the question is, do you really want to? It's the dichotomy of power vs freedom as gameplay mechanic - calling upon the mummy lets you exert more power on the outside by sacrificing the power within your own cult, and the more often you do that, the more you have to deal with the mummy's vision for the cult.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Morangias View Post
                            Personally, I'd make a Mummy game as a mix of Crusader Kings and X-Com, gameplay-wise. You'd start by designing your mummy and your cult leader, determining their appearances, strengths and weaknesses, and defining personality traits, as well as add some personal touches to the cult, from picking the basic organization model to choosing the name, symbolism used and the beliefs that keep it all together.

                            Then, the game would progress to the "strategic view", where you'd be playing as the cult leader, with the goal of managing cult business - activities would include recruitment and expansion, seeking relics, infiltrating governments and keeping your secrets from them, interacting with rival cults, upgrading the cult headquarters and the mummy's tomb, and such. The cults, the governments and other important organizations would be run and staffed by NPCs pursuing their own motivations in the vein of Crusader Kings, including the NPCs that make up your own cult, so watch out for over-ambitious lieutenants and schisms in your own ranks!

                            For certain activities (recovering relics, assassinations, duking it out with other cults etc.) the game would let you enter a "tactical view" and run an assembled squad of cultists X-Com-style, with turn-based combat and elements of stealth (and maybe even some light puzzle solving, in the case of recovering relics from ancient tombs).

                            So, where does the mummy factor in all this? She's an asset - a very risky one to use, as the only time you'd have direct control over her would be if she was assigned to a squad running a mission in "tactical view", where you can have fun curbstomping the opposition with Affinities and Utterances for some time. Outside of that, and being able to assign a task to her upon calling her to life, she's an NPC like any other, realizing her motivations and reacting to events based on character traits you've chosen for her - and sometimes, ones she'd acquire in the course of play! As your cult expands, builds up her tomb and acquires relics and vestiges, you can call upon the mummy more often - the question is, do you really want to? It's the dichotomy of power vs freedom as gameplay mechanic - calling upon the mummy lets you exert more power on the outside by sacrificing the power within your own cult, and the more often you do that, the more you have to deal with the mummy's vision for the cult.
                            I've always seen Hunter as being better suited to X-COM like gameplay. While this is interesting, it really focuses more on the Cult/Organization than the Mummy, I feel. Seriously, you could drop the Mummy and it wouldn't really change the core game at all, which seems somewhat counter-intuitive to a "Mummy" game.

                            Hmm. Part of the normal flow of game progression is that the character gains information and power as the game progresses. With Mummy, the power progression is obviously inverted, which mixes things up. But I wonder if you could get a decent single-player game out of playing with Mummy's game assumptions to make them fit gaming standards - you start the game awakening from your Tomb with Amnesia (normal), but at Sekhem 1. Something subverted the usual rule with how the Descent and the Rite of Return are supposed to work, and finding out why/how is your First Purpose. Naturally, as you uncover more/progress the plot, you would get your Sekhem back, ending with 10 (and then starting a normal or accelerated Descent?).

                            Another game that would be fun to model a Mummy game after: Overlord. The Arisen is the Overlord (obviously), with your cultists as the minions.
                            Last edited by Vent0; 05-16-2016, 09:56 AM.


                            Malkydel: "And the Machine dictated; let there be adequate illumination."
                            Yossarian: "And lo, it was optimal."

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Vent0 View Post
                              I've always seen Hunter as being better suited to X-COM like gameplay. While this is interesting, it really focuses more on the Cult/Organization than the Mummy, I feel. Seriously, you could drop the Mummy and it wouldn't really change the core game at all, which seems somewhat counter-intuitive to a "Mummy" game.
                              I don't think you can preserve the themes and unique gameplay of MtC any other way. What I'm proposing is the "pyramid" story framework, as seen from the only perspective available that offers a continuous narrative - that of the cult, rather than the mummy. That the mummy herself becomes kinda optional is, I think, an interesting observation on the nature of the Arisen.

                              The big advantage of "designing" games from the comfort of my couch and knowing nobody's going to buy my pitch is that I don't have to care about how marketable my idea is, and go with what would work

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