Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Example Cult: Joint Terrorism Task Force 42

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Example Cult: Joint Terrorism Task Force 42

    In the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks, the United States' government scrambled to construct a solid line of defense against threats to America and found a ready answer in the FBI's Joint Terrorism Task Forces. JTTFs are collaborative efforts between the FBI, local law enforcement, and other federal agencies, pooling resources and personnel to thwart terrorism, with at least one active in every state. While most of these task forces are fairly uniform, JTTF 42 diverges from others of its king in two important ways. The first is that it focuses more on art theft and relics smuggling than any other.

    The second is that it doesn't actually exist.

    During the dramatic restructuring of the American intelligence and security apparatus in the early days of the War on Terror, a lot of black budget money and staff were lost in the bureaucratic shuffle; so long as an excuse relating to counter-terrorism could be thrown out, few questions were asked. One lucky Arisen happened to already have loyal servants active in Washington in the early 2000s, and it was trivial to build a sanctioned cult using government funds and clearance. The men and women who staff JTTF 42 have no clue that they serve a five thousand year old immortal, and most of them would scoff at the idea that anything supernatural lurks in the shadows of the world... but after a decade and a half of things they can't explain, some are starting to wonder.

    JTTF 42 is based out of DC, but has access to fusion centers across the nation and can easily get anywhere they must with a short flight and a flashing badge. Their official focus is on examining how illegal sale of cultural artifacts helps fund international terrorism (for as much as various groups disdain idolatry and make videos of destroying priceless artifacts, many more of those items wind up on the black market in order to buy more weapons), and indeed the majority of this work is legitimate. JTTF primarily spends its time investigating actual crime and making perfectly above-board (as above-board as counterterrorism gets, anyway) arrests, but any genuine Relics that are found in the line of duty wind up delivered to their Arisen master. Many of the "domestic terror cells" they target are actually rival Cults, and they're lucky to have escaped the direct wrath of any Deathless so far.

    As a Merit for an Arisen: Cult (Conspiracy) 8 (Reach 4, Grasp 2, Intellectual, Paranoid)

    As a Mystery Cult for a mortal:
    1: JTTF draws its members from law enforcement or art specialists, and only accepts those with proper training. Gain a Specialty in either Investigation (Counterterrorism) or Academics (Art History).
    2: The task force operates alongside police wherever they go. Gain the Contacts (Local Law Enforcement) Merit.
    3: As an official task force, JTTF 42 has access to "fusion centers," offices where federal agencies share and exchange information. Gain the Library (Investigate) Merit at two dots.
    4: If you've made it to this level, you're either the head of your team or important enough to be organizing missions yourself. Gain the Resources Merit at three dots, but only for purchasing things that would make sense for federal law enforcement; plane tickets, hotel rooms, and common guns are all possible, but flamethrowers and ritual components aren't without a damn good reason.
    5: The number of agents at this rank can be counted on one finger, and have seen too much to ignore the truth any longer. Gain the Witness Merit.

    Important cultists:

    Robin Drawes studied art history and archeology at Yale, and then taught there for decades. He's traveled the world to examine various sites, with a focus on North Africa and the Middle East; JTTF 42 brought him out of retirement because he's one of the best in the field. Drawes doesn't much care for law enforcement but is excited to be handling such interesting artifacts again, and knows more about the supernatural than he's ever likely to admit.

    Samantha Wu threw herself into law enforcement and excelled at it; she achieved minor fame after leading an investigation that stopped a domestic terror cell from conducting a major attack in Portland. That caught the attention of someone higher up and led to her recent transfer into JTTF 42, a position she resents and views as a punishment. She feels like her talents are squandered on something as banal as art theft, and misses tracking fertilizer purchases and online communications.

    Brandon Jackson is a lifelong veteran, having served as a sniper in the Gulf War and then being recruited into Baltimore's SWAT team; the FBI picked him up over a decade ago, and he barely noticed. Distant, quiet, and professional, Jackson rarely speaks and only cares about getting the job done, but the team looks past his cold exterior to appreciate his incredible results.


    Call me Regina or Lex.

    Female pronouns for me, please.

  • #2
    Sorry for a gravedig, but this post interested me. So what keeps TFV, VASCU, and the Barrett Commission off their backs?

    Comment


    • #3
      Presumably they don't know about it. I mean, it's primarily a legit task-force doing actual counter-terrorism work.

      Mind you, there are clearly issues looming that might bring greater scrutiny.


      Comment


      • #4
        Well the number of art specialists would be a pretty obvious one. Stuff like that isn't usually terrorism's forte, they don't sell art unless it's obviously going to get them something worthwhile due to the effort it takes to pull a heist when hacking accounts or simply robbing banks is easier. Also, are the fusion centers there to grab more cultists, or are they just to keep a pulse on information?

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Flyboy254 View Post
          Stuff like that isn't usually terrorism's forte, they don't sell art unless it's obviously going to get them something worthwhile due to the effort it takes to pull a heist when hacking accounts or simply robbing banks is easier.
          On what are you basing that? The black market in antiquities is a real thing.


          Comment


          • #6
            Mainly off of what radical groups have done already to priceless antiquities. It seems like most radical groups prefer to blow up or disregard antiques and art rather than make an effort to sell them, especially when compared to the more prevalent money makers of human trafficking, gun running, and narcotics. But I'm always willing to be told I'm wrong.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Flyboy254 View Post
              Sorry for a gravedig, but this post interested me. So what keeps TFV, VASCU, and the Barrett Commission off their backs?
              JTTF 42 is below VALKYRIE's pay grade in the same way that VASCU is, but even doubly so because they lack any supernatural mojo to throw around. To an outside observer, JTTF 42 just looks like any other cluster of FBI agents, and there's countless numbers of them out there; that's kind of the point. They aren't doing anything notable other than specializing in a given area of crime.

              Originally posted by Flyboy254 View Post
              Well the number of art specialists would be a pretty obvious one. Stuff like that isn't usually terrorism's forte, they don't sell art unless it's obviously going to get them something worthwhile due to the effort it takes to pull a heist when hacking accounts or simply robbing banks is easier. Also, are the fusion centers there to grab more cultists, or are they just to keep a pulse on information?
              Near as I can tell, a fusion center is just a means of putting data from numerous teams and fields together in one easily accessible place. JTTF 42 may well have less than two dozen permanent staff members, but it can have someone ready for an autopsy or a translation from Aramaic or a carbon dating within a day. These aren't black sites for rendition.

              Originally posted by Flyboy254 View Post
              Mainly off of what radical groups have done already to priceless antiquities. It seems like most radical groups prefer to blow up or disregard antiques and art rather than make an effort to sell them, especially when compared to the more prevalent money makers of human trafficking, gun running, and narcotics. But I'm always willing to be told I'm wrong.
              It's certainly not their primary source of income, no, but it's a notable thing, and that's before we consider a Chronicles of Darkness world where the Arisen want more relics and idiots like the Payday Gang (or my Carnivale) making lots of money grabbing them out of museums and Middle Eastern warzones.


              Call me Regina or Lex.

              Female pronouns for me, please.

              Comment


              • #8
                Well this is awesome.


                Sean K.I.W. Steele, Freelance Writer
                Work Blog Coming Soon
                The world is not beautiful, therefore it is.-Keiichi Sigsawa, Kino's Journey

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by ArcaneArts View Post
                  Well this is awesome.
                  Thanks! All of my Example Cults are there to try and prove that a mummy's servants can look like a hell of a lot more than weirdos mumbling faux-Egyptian in hooded robes.


                  Call me Regina or Lex.

                  Female pronouns for me, please.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Flyboy254 View Post
                    Mainly off of what radical groups have done already to priceless antiquities. It seems like most radical groups prefer to blow up or disregard antiques and art rather than make an effort to sell them, especially when compared to the more prevalent money makers of human trafficking, gun running, and narcotics. But I'm always willing to be told I'm wrong.
                    Well, the suspicion seems to be that they destroy prominent pieces for publicity and then sell everything else off on the side, or in the case of IS, they sell liscences to local looters.

                    It's not the biggest stream of income but it's taken seriously enough for there to be anti-antiquities smuggling groups in the US government operating under the banner of anti-terrorism.


                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X