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  • #16
    Well, either way, aggravated or lethal, it would really effing hurt, which, while usually not being a detractor to any but the most dedicated roleplayers, should be enough of a deterrent in theory going forward.

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    • #17
      As others have said, proving things is difficult, but even Auspex isn't taken as Truth because who knows the true motives of the Auspexer? Auspex is pretty much he said, she said.
      Last edited by Rathamus; 03-17-2017, 03:31 PM.

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      • #18
        To be fair, regarding the hot poker, Im pretty sure most things would catch fire when said poker is forcibly shoved against it. So, maybe not aggravated from the initial stab, but if you hold it there, things are likely to burn. After all, a poker (made of iron) would be glowing red at a higher temperature than it requires for the human body to actually catch fire.

        Edit: After some looking around, it is surprisingly hard to find out the temperature for flesh to actually catch fire. Found out that 500c is enough to ash a human over several hours though, and metals start glowing red around 400c, but become visibly glowing in daylight around 525. Still pretty sure that's enough to ignite someone.
        Last edited by Necrosx; 03-17-2017, 05:22 PM.

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        • #19
          It is difficult to ignite flesh because of water content and the fact that as soon as it burns it turns into carbon which is flame retardant. Burning flesh typically requires additional fuel or using exposure to flame or hot materials. I can verify that even at 500c flesh will not burn from brief exposure, but it is painful. Don't stick your hand in an industrial furnace, kids.

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          • #20
            Even high power electrocution doesn't set people's skin on fire. Humans are ~80% water I believe and until it takes at least some time to burn away (liquid water instantly evaporating results in an explosion - watch people deep frying turkeys on youtube), so there is little chance of flames until it is at least mostly burned away.
            Water also absorbs huge amounts of energy before turning to steam so the red hot poker would cool fast as it burns away the water, and with all that water content, the flesh would shrink fast as it's lost.

            Vampires are a whole different story and I remember reading in one of the books, maybe even an older edition, that part of the reason they fear fire so much is because their skin IS flammable so I suppose the conclusion to all of this is: Whatever works best in your campaign.

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            • #21
              Sunlight and fire deal damage from a mystical connection. I wouldn't exactly say vampires are more flammable as in they can catch fire and continue to burn without stimulus, but they certainly burn easier. Again that is mysticism rather than any physical properties. That was the last version I read of it. Red hot or molten metal being close enough to fire to have the same effect is house rule territory by necessity, too niche.

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              • #22
                Blush of life means that a vampire's skin is just as flush with fluid as a regular human's; no idea if non-blush would be "dry" or not, but I imagine that unconcoius attempts to "heal" the wound would bring vitae close to the surface of such a wound anyways.

                The whole flamable skin was in Masquerade, which is at least two steps removed from 2e Requiem now. Maybe more if it was an early edition of Masquerade that doesn't apply.

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                • #23
                  Well, I originally didn't think molten metal would work.

                  But if you look in the book, under the Bane of Fire, "molten metal" is specifically listed as +3 damage modifier fire damage.

                  But that's molten. I probably wouldn't qualify a red-hot poker. Molten is defined by being liquefied by high heat.

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