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Half-Damned - what do we know?

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  • they don't stop happening at high humanity, clan banes just don't apply until you first drop to humanity 6 (you start at 7), but after you drop to humanity 6 and your clan bane takes effect you will always be effected by your clan bane, even if you rise you humanity to 7+ again

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    • It's not that they don't aply at high Humanity but that they don't emerge until Humanity 6 but then you're stuck with it.

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      • Originally posted by Spider Queen View Post
        I wasn't actually aware that clan banes stopped applying at high Humanity, so this is a good reason to amend the Merit.
        Not so much that they don't apply at High Humanity, but they don't kick in until you drop below 7 the first time. If you raise it later, the curse still applies.

        On the other hand, you could argue that the clan bane doesn't have a mechanical effect after the first humanity drop, but the Haunt still feels "creepy" before it.


        CofD booklists:
        Beast I Changeling | Geist l Hunter l Mage | Mummy | Promethean | Vampire

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        • Originally posted by Spider Queen View Post
          I wasn't actually aware that clan banes stopped applying at high Humanity, so this is a good reason to amend the Merit.
          Should we put this in the errata thread, then?

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          • Originally posted by lnodiv View Post
            Should we put this in the errata thread, then?
            Feel free. My suggested correction:

            "While you can choose any clan to imitate, playing at being Nosferatu can suddenly become dangerous if you do not maintain at least the pretense of Humanity. A non-revenant vampire may also take this Merit, though it is less useful to them, and Haunts face the same obstacles in reverse as those who imitate them." Next paragraph, remove the last sentence entirely.
            Last edited by Spider Queen; 12-02-2017, 09:19 PM.

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            • It's interesting to see the comparative strengths of the half damned vs. each other.

              Dhampirs have their own powers and can't learn Disciplines except Cruac with a three dot merit. Still between Cruac and Malisons they are potientally powerful Blood Sorcerers even if they have to injure themselves to do so (down side, they heal like humans). They are good at twisting fate as well.

              Ghouls are for the most part more powerful then Dampyr's having simular powers to Vampires, including healing themselves with Vitae, and using Disciplines, but can barely use Blood Sorcery at all. Downside most are slaves to Vampires.

              Reverents are still more powerful, but at the cost of being the hungiest, but they can feed on animals. I can see Reverents fleeing to literal farms.

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              • As a random note, given the timing of this and the Changeling Kickstarter, has anyone else had the thought "What happens when you turn a goblin fruit plant into a Mandragora" yet?


                My CofD Homebrew

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                • Originally posted by falco1029 View Post
                  As a random note, given the timing of this and the Changeling Kickstarter, has anyone else had the thought "What happens when you turn a goblin fruit plant into a Mandragora" yet?
                  If only we had an upcoming Dark Era that featured both changelings and vampires...

                  I'd also like to see dhampirs interacting with changelings and mummies. It strikes me there could be some good story fodder there.


                  CofD booklists:
                  Beast I Changeling | Geist l Hunter l Mage | Mummy | Promethean | Vampire

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                  • Originally posted by Second Chances View Post

                    If only we had an upcoming Dark Era that featured both changelings and vampires...

                    I'd also like to see dhampirs interacting with changelings and mummies. It strikes me there could be some good story fodder there.
                    *about to say something*

                    ...wait, yeah, Requiem for Regina didn't exactly address anything of the sort if memory serves.

                    Carry on!!!

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                    • Originally posted by Spider Queen View Post
                      I'm glad you like my little morality tale, there. I'll note that the story in Half-Damned is Kindred mythology, and things probably didn't go down quite as pat as the tale would have you believe.

                      I've long wanted more stuff for rural Kindred, in both Masquerade and Requiem. This is one of my little stabs at that.
                      It's really neat! Lost clans are always an interesting hook to build off of. Out of curiosity, do you have any thoughts as to when the Mikhaili were active and when they were driven to (near) extinction?

                      **Furiously scribbles notes for Dark Eras 3**


                      CofD booklists:
                      Beast I Changeling | Geist l Hunter l Mage | Mummy | Promethean | Vampire

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                      • does a revenant need Fertile Vitae to use "Raise the Familiar"? thought to ask.


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                        • Originally posted by Second Chances View Post
                          It's really neat! Lost clans are always an interesting hook to build off of. Out of curiosity, do you have any thoughts as to when the Mikhaili were active and when they were driven to (near) extinction?

                          **Furiously scribbles notes for Dark Eras 3**
                          Glad you asked!

                          [In one of several theories. Also edited noting Spider Queen's earlier responses. As a direct comment, I do like the Revenant section! It's my favorite of the three.]

                          The Huns (as they were known to the Romans, later), were evicted from what is now Western China about 200 BC, and chased west by Chinese generals to ensure they got good and far and didn't come back to harass the Han again. This initiated the Migration Period, as the Huns knocked into one people-group after another, setting them moving west and washing into Europe. I would pick this period, broadly, as when the Mikhaili were disturbed and eventually submerged by invaders.

                          The Mikhaili would be from among the Slavic peoples who lived in the enormous forest band from Germany all the way to the Pacific Ocean. I'd place them mostly west of the Urals, however. North of them lay Finno-Ugric peoples, and south lay the Scythian plains and the great steppe and deserts of Central Asia.

                          As an aside, the Slavic tribe of Novgorod invited Rurik (a viking, or varangian) in the late 9th century to be a king to rule and protect them. (I'm oversimplifying--it may have been a protection racket.) The end result was the conquering of a series of city-state kinglets scattered throughout the region, and several centuries of conflict that ended up, in time, placing Muscovy on top. Circling back to the Mikhaili, one wonders why it was then that Novgorod felt they were without rulership, hmm?

                          I'd love migration period DE, but there is actually so little to base something on that you'd end up writing >75% from whole cloth.

                          --Khanwulf
                          Last edited by Khanwulf; 12-04-2017, 04:12 PM.

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                          • I really get the feeling from this book that the writers don't understand what sets Requiem 2ed apart from 1ed, and Masquerade. It feels forced at times and puts a lot of overemphasis on the abusive nature of vampires and how shit they are, how the Half-Damned is so abused and neglected and, really put it, more hated then useful. Like Ghouls get so beaten by a thorny stick it's practically impossible to think how ghouls could be anywhere near useful with their mental och physical fuck-up-ness they all suffer. I did not expect to see this much abuse in requiem, i wouldn't even expect this from Sabbat or Camarilla elders en mass in V:tM. Where is the dynamics? Why is so much black and white? This book feels a lot more V:tM then it does V:tR:2ed. And beyond simple theme and mood about the setting, rules and shit seems to be mixed up.


                            But a question about the specific rules about the vampire condition. I've always been under the impression that Blood Bonds stop working after death, e.g. the Embrace. However the old Ghoul book says i doesn't, and the forum recently said this to me, and it opened up some new thoughts and ideas that i actually has come to like. This book seems to remove this, by saying that Revenants loose Blood Bonds if they're uplifted to Kindred. Can't we get this a bit straight out?

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                            • Mm... so from what I've been hearing the last few days, this book probably isn't for me. I adored the tonal shift the 2e core took with vampires and ghouls, and one part of that is thanks to the spin of "ghoul abuse happens, but is generally seen in Kindred society as roughly equivalent to attacking one's own foot". Still had strong, unsettling, possessive undertones that storytellers could play up if they wanted ("you aren't just you anymore, you're my eyes and arms and voice in the daylight hours and you are bound to me by my Blood" is pretty damn creepy in its own right), but it was strikingly - pleasantly - different from the "mangy mutt on a short, rusty chain" treatment that seemed the default in 1e. It sounds like this supplement (or at least sections of it) tossed that aside in favor of basically recreating some of the most uncomfortable parts of 1e's Ghouls book at best, or possibly even started treading the "being a mortal sucks and you will be used up and tossed aside like a dollar store battery" path that WoD seemed to favor and that ChroD has been pretty good at avoiding up until now.

                              At this point I don't care as much if animal ghouls or mandragora have a presence, or that the dhampir got reworked to be more than just blood-soaked fly zappers. If the book isn't consistent with the gameline and edition it was written for (or even with itself if I'm hearing correctly) then I'm going to pass on it and keep my expectations low for the next supplement. I don't want to think it's going to turn into a trend, but between the response to this and my own feelings about Thousand Years of Night it feels like it might.

                              To those of you who have and enjoy this book, I hope that it goes over well at your table regardless of if you're playing a character or creating NPCs with its rules.


                              Have a bit of a bad habit of extensively editing posts after, well, posting them. Bear with me...

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                              • Originally posted by Sconce View Post
                                Mm... so from what I've been hearing the last few days, this book probably isn't for me. I adored the tonal shift the 2e core took with vampires and ghouls, and one part of that is thanks to the spin of "ghoul abuse happens, but is generally seen in Kindred society as roughly equivalent to attacking one's own foot". Still had strong, unsettling, possessive undertones that storytellers could play up if they wanted ("you aren't just you anymore, you're my eyes and arms and voice in the daylight hours and you are bound to me by my Blood" is pretty damn creepy in its own right), but it was strikingly - pleasantly - different from the "mangy mutt on a short, rusty chain" treatment that seemed the default in 1e. It sounds like this supplement (or at least sections of it) tossed that aside in favor of basically recreating some of the most uncomfortable parts of 1e's Ghouls book at best, or possibly even started treading the "being a mortal sucks and you will be used up and tossed aside like a dollar store battery" path that WoD seemed to favor and that ChroD has been pretty good at avoiding up until now.

                                At this point I don't care as much if animal ghouls or mandragora have a presence, or that the dhampir got reworked to be more than just blood-soaked fly zappers. If the book isn't consistent with the gameline and edition it was written for (or even with itself if I'm hearing correctly) then I'm going to pass on it and keep my expectations low for the next supplement. I don't want to think it's going to turn into a trend, but between the response to this and my own feelings about Thousand Years of Night it feels like it might.

                                To those of you who have and enjoy this book, I hope that it goes over well at your table regardless of if you're playing a character or creating NPCs with its rules.

                                What I am hoping for is that the developers, writers and editors will come on here and see the errata and flaws. It is still only in the PDF version and we know that with the core Blood and Smoke / vampire the requiem 2edition, there were still several major changes and edits. (such as the title of the book ) So hopefully the powers that be will fix this book before they send it to print on Demand.

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